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Old 08-07-2014, 10:36 AM
 
Location: CO
2,456 posts, read 2,437,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thupermoon View Post
RE: Controlling house sparrows. The article surprised me. The only birds I've seen around this area are these "sparrows", blue jays, starlings, and magpies. I'm now bewildered at what kinds of birds are actual songbirds. I can see I have some home work to do on this subject!
Songbirds describes the perching birds, as opposed to the water birds or birds of prey for instance. The "songs" are not all melodic, many are buzzy insect-like sounds, and chirping and chipping abound. The common House Finch is a good singer and is often seen at feeders. Not so melodic for the hated House Sparrow.

However, the combination of all the chips, chirps, buzzes, and songs combined early in the day makes for the well-known "dawn chorus."
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Old 08-07-2014, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,492,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sll3454 View Post
Your blue jays are most likely scrub jays. (Blue jays don't live in the western states.)
Western Scrub-Jay, Identification, All About Birds - Cornell Lab of Ornithology
We don't have Blue Jays in Denver. I grew up around them but for some reason, their sound has a very negative association for me. I think it just reminds me of being somewhere oppressively humid, hot, and buggy.
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Old 08-07-2014, 03:08 PM
 
Location: CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
We don't have Blue Jays in Denver. I grew up around them but for some reason, their sound has a very negative association for me. I think it just reminds me of being somewhere oppressively humid, hot, and buggy.
My husband claims he rarely sees them at his house in Englewood either but I am a mere five miles away in Littleton and I have many Bluejays and have for years. Same with Magpies. They eat suet and peanuts and don't care much for sunflower seeds.

We are in a rather unique situation in the Denver area in that we can see five species of jays within an hour's drive. Bluejays in town, Scrub Jays out in Parker area, and Stellar's, Gray, and Pinyon Jays in the mountains.
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Old 08-18-2014, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Kihei, Maui
177 posts, read 253,568 times
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Here is an Idea that worked for me. I fed in the winter months and during the spring migration season. I planted many different types of wild habitat that produces seeds and berries during the summer and early fall. These include wild grape, raspberry, Mulberry. sunflower, many wild flowers that attract pollinators. I make sure there is water on the property (10 Acres) at all times. If my shallow pond dries up I fill bird baths and pans.

During the winter most of the territorial birds flock up and we get up to 10 pairs of Cardinals multiple species of woodpeckers, pairs of Bluejays, Asian doves by the score. Morning doves until it gets really cold. I have other fruit and nut bearing trees on the property to help attract the wildlife also.

Plant or help some of the "dirty" trees and shrubs that tend to mess up the grass and stain sidewalks but do it away from those areas. Trees and bushes that hang on to their fruit are the best for a long term effect. It keeps them around longer in the fall early winter. Some brush piles are also a help for the younger fledgling and smaller birds if there are predators like cats and Hawks around. Leaving a dead tree up if it won't cause damage if it falls is good for birds that live in the hollow spaces. Trees and bushes that have thorns are also good. Plants like thistles provide the soft downey materials that some finches need to build nests with. I just plant my sunflowers for the finches and leave them standing until all of the seeds are gone. To see them flying under the heads (sunflower heds turn with the seeds down when they are done growing and drying) and grabbing the seeds or grabbing the heads from the bottom and feeding upside-down is worth planting them.

Most of the time it is the habitat that brings in the birds. They really do prefer the natural foods over the feeders. Once my natural plants are providing food I quit feeding for the summer there is no need. During this time is when the sparrows feast and just eat food and then the pigeons take the place of the doves. BTW once they start to nest is when they become territorial because they need a certain size of quality area to raise their young. After the young leave the nest is when they start to flock again in preparation for the migration and for safety. In the same light I keep many patches of milkweed around for the butterflies Monarchs need them. You need to remember that diversity is the real name of the game. Everything you do for them helps you in some way we all share this big green home.
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Old 08-18-2014, 02:21 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,103 posts, read 17,634,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Camper1 View Post
I used to mix a variety of bird seeds but it got so expensive that now I just use the cheapest wild bird seed I can find and I still gets the same birds.


As for the hummers, I jsut use the sugar water. 4 parts water to 1 part sugar. I just microwave the water and stir in the sugar until dissolved and let cool. I get tons of hummers!!
this ^^^exactly if you all are so worried about house sparrows don't feed birds at all jeeze unbelievable ...I would love for a neighbor to tell me what I should be feeding wild birds ...I would tell them where to go in a heartbeat ..
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Old 08-18-2014, 05:24 PM
 
Location: CO
2,456 posts, read 2,437,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
this ^^^exactly if you all are so worried about house sparrows don't feed birds at all jeeze unbelievable ...I would love for a neighbor to tell me what I should be feeding wild birds ...I would tell them where to go in a heartbeat ..
Feeding wild birds means you take the good with the bad, if that means House sparrows and squirrels help themselves that's going to happen, regardless! This question of invasive species (like the House sparrow) happens in the plant world too but that's an argument for a different post. In this one, the OP asked for advice on attracting songbirds and got some good responses.
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