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Old 08-09-2014, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,763 posts, read 3,835,734 times
Reputation: 3563

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I live in SC on top of a sandhill.
Literally.
The soil, if you want to call it that, is sand, silth, and clay.
Sand everywhere. Like living at the beach, but no water.
It's hot in the summer. I mean hot, endless heat and humidty.
It's cold in the winter, not as cold as many northern climates, but
it does get cold here.
The soil is acid and lifeless, except for the weeds that grow without water.
The hottest months of the year, June, July and August, are the months we
do not get rain. Literally, no rain.
Bahia grass grows well here, and even that browns out in the summer.
So, amending the soil, mulching to an extreme, avoiding anything that needs
alot of water to survie, and getting huge water bills, because you have to water here.
If you don't, your yard will wash away down the street if it rains.
I grow alot in pots. I hate pots, but I would miss plants so bad if I didn't
use them. Our soil is exhausting for most plants and pots really make a difference.
Oh well, every year is a challange I guess for everyone.
That's the way life is, I guess it just makes growing a nice plant here more of a
reward.
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Old 08-09-2014, 11:11 PM
 
Location: CO
2,455 posts, read 2,610,794 times
Reputation: 5190
Quote:
Originally Posted by Butterfly4u View Post
I live in SC on top of a sandhill.
Literally.
The soil, if you want to call it that, is sand, silth, and clay.
Sand everywhere. Like living at the beach, but no water.
It's hot in the summer. I mean hot, endless heat and humidty.
It's cold in the winter, not as cold as many northern climates, but
it does get cold here.
The soil is acid and lifeless, except for the weeds that grow without water.
The hottest months of the year, June, July and August, are the months we
do not get rain. Literally, no rain.
Bahia grass grows well here, and even that browns out in the summer.
So, amending the soil, mulching to an extreme, avoiding anything that needs
alot of water to survie, and getting huge water bills, because you have to water here.
If you don't, your yard will wash away down the street if it rains.
I grow alot in pots. I hate pots, but I would miss plants so bad if I didn't
use them. Our soil is exhausting for most plants and pots really make a difference.
Oh well, every year is a challange I guess for everyone.
That's the way life is, I guess it just makes growing a nice plant here more of a
reward.
Containers and raised beds sound like the only way to garden there! If I had all that sand I'd be wondering where the beach was.
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Old 08-10-2014, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,010 posts, read 22,741,002 times
Reputation: 34905
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
I just moved to the seattle area from warmer areas of the PNW. So I knew I was unlikely to be able to grow as many tomatoes as I'd like, and I was sure right. On the other hand, fresh lettuce and other greens grow any month of the year, and that's great, they are a staple for me.

SLUGS are the biggest issue for me, I've never dealt with them in such numbers. Thinking about getting a couple of ducks...
When I lived in WA I used to set out beer slug traps and they worked great. You put a container, like an old plastic cottage container, into the soil so the top is even with the top of the ground. Then, you put beer in the bottom 1/4 or 1/3 of the container. Next morning all those slug lushes are drowned in the beer.
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Old 08-10-2014, 02:11 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,547,229 times
Reputation: 4248
I have a huge bone to pick with home builders here, and I'm sure this happens all over. The topsoil gets stripped and sold off, and new homeowners are left with terrible soil where nothing can grow. Our property was like that. In seven years we have spent more than $25K on garden mix and compost delivered in bulk. The cost to move and spread it made it even worse. But we finally have soil that is rich, fertile and easily worked. I wish it were illegal for builders to sell off parts of their customers' property (soil).

And to add insult to injury, a local garden center has this nugget printed on their bags of topsoil: "Buy your real estate one bag at a time!" It should read, "Buy BACK your real estate one bag at a time".
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Old 08-17-2014, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,561 posts, read 1,807,205 times
Reputation: 2659
Denverian, I second your dislike of everything brown and dormant for so long in Denver. I've lived there. Your idea to use as many evergreens as possible sounds wise, as long as they're properly positioned to avoid getting scorched. The heavy clay soil used to drive me nuts there. But their tap water is quite good (but expensive.)

Here in Phoenix my major "pain in the ass" is our lousy tap water; it has a high salt level. It results in scorched leaves on susceptible plants. City water departments can't do much about it b/c it's super expensive to remove the salt. I'd say that's my biggest beef with gardening in Phx.
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Old 08-21-2014, 06:47 PM
 
2,163 posts, read 1,061,471 times
Reputation: 8864
Slugs are my main problem here in the PNW. The best luck I've had beating them was laying down strips of copper around the plants. Other than that, I would grow the slugs' favorites in hanging baskets to keep them away.
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Old 08-22-2014, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,218,153 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
Denverian, I second your dislike of everything brown and dormant for so long in Denver. I've lived there. Your idea to use as many evergreens as possible sounds wise, as long as they're properly positioned to avoid getting scorched. The heavy clay soil used to drive me nuts there. But their tap water is quite good (but expensive.)

Here in Phoenix my major "pain in the ass" is our lousy tap water; it has a high salt level. It results in scorched leaves on susceptible plants. City water departments can't do much about it b/c it's super expensive to remove the salt. I'd say that's my biggest beef with gardening in Phx.
I never heard that about Phoenix water!

Many people here have no evergreens in their landscape, which just looks bad all winter IMO. But there are things you can grow here that stay green all winter. Holly definitely does well. I have a slow growing Holly that appears to be more of a tree than a shrub. I don't have any, but I see Rhododendrons around Denver tool Wouldn't expect that.
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Old 08-22-2014, 11:19 AM
 
13,675 posts, read 13,493,126 times
Reputation: 39792
Jeez. I feel better, but oddly, I have a new appreciation for Jersey's "Garden State" title. I didn't realize there were so many problematic growing areas around the country!

My best friend often calls to taunt me from the homeland about how she's got 5-foot tomato plants and whatnot. Le sigh.
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Old 06-15-2015, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Western Colorado
11,055 posts, read 12,403,387 times
Reputation: 25951
Here in western Colorado. I know why this place is called "the rockies". Luckily I got a friend with a tractor to break the ground, then I spent days picking rocks out. Then tilled, planted and a huge hail storm...and another...and another. Finally, June 15th and my garden is looking good. Hopefully things will continue to grow until the first frost/freeze/snow in September. A whole 10 weeks to grow vegetables! It just amazes me anything can grow here.
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Old 06-15-2015, 02:14 PM
 
733 posts, read 646,907 times
Reputation: 1873
West Texas. Water so salty and hard, it burns the plants, and watering is restricted, anyway. Sun is relentless. Soil is just dust and then hardpan. POOR POOR PITIFUL ME!
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