U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-27-2014, 03:55 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
1,615 posts, read 2,831,335 times
Reputation: 1910

Advertisements

I might plant Tea Olive trees every second fence post, so I would like them to spread as much as possible. Someone at a nursery told me if I keep trimming the top of the tree as it grows taller and taller, it will focus more energy on spreading wider where it isn't being cut. Can anyone verify that?

Also, what do you think about these trees? I don't have a very good sense of smell, but I haven't found anything negative about the smell online. Everyone seems to love them, and people purposely plant them near patios. They were recommended to me along with "Wax Ligustrum" and "Cherry Laurel" for my full sun location in zone 7b.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-27-2014, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,483 posts, read 29,425,055 times
Reputation: 11885
I have all of them. Tea olive grows slowly, the other two grow fairly quick. The only downside to Cherry Laurel and Ligustrum is that they will reseed and you'll find seedlings everywhere. Carolina Cherry Laurel is native, the other two are Asian.

If you want something to spread out you should consider Wax Myrtle. They're native to the Deep South, but I think they'll do fine in 7b.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2014, 07:26 PM
 
1,480 posts, read 792,648 times
Reputation: 568
tea olive (osmanthus species) can have fragrant (apricot like) blooms. there are several different species (o. fragrans, o. armatus, o x. fortunei, o. heterophyllua,) all can become denser with some pruning of the plant (that's how most all hedges stay as hedges, LOL). you might take a close look at fortunei which is of generally slow dense growth. think the consensus on wax ligustrum (AKA privet ) some folks love the smell while others think the odor is "sickly sweet" . cherry laurel (prunus caroliniana) can be a nice evergreen large shrub or small tree (the cultivar "bright and tight" is more compact and "compacta" is even smaller and denser---6-8') ---both it and the ligustrum/privet can produce lots of berries which the birds can spread all over to create lots of extra seedlings (as mentioned above). again as previously mentioned above, you might also consider wax myrtle (myica cerifera) which is an easily controlled evergreen with pleasantly aromatic folige (when crushed). michelia fusca (banan shrub) is a normally dense and compact large shrub with fragrant flowers as is it's hybrid m x. foggii "all spice". hope this is of some help.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 09-27-2014 at 07:28 PM.. Reason: include more info.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-28-2014, 09:57 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
1,615 posts, read 2,831,335 times
Reputation: 1910
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
I have all of them. Tea olive grows slowly, the other two grow fairly quick. The only downside to Cherry Laurel and Ligustrum is that they will reseed and you'll find seedlings everywhere. Carolina Cherry Laurel is native, the other two are Asian.

If you want something to spread out you should consider Wax Myrtle. They're native to the Deep South, but I think they'll do fine in 7b.
Thanks for the recommendation. Wax Myrtles are at my local nursery, so I'll look into them. One thing I like about the plants I mentioned in the original post is that they can survive in full sun in the Memphis heat with ease. I'm assuming Wax Myrtle is the same.

If you have any pictures of your setup online please share.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-28-2014, 10:22 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,531 posts, read 42,694,765 times
Reputation: 57179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geneyus View Post
Thanks for the recommendation. Wax Myrtles are at my local nursery, so I'll look into them. One thing I like about the plants I mentioned in the original post is that they can survive in full sun in the Memphis heat with ease. I'm assuming Wax Myrtle is the same.

If you have any pictures of your setup online please share.
I have a wax myrtle which is trained into a tree next to the driveway in zone 8, full sun, and it is a nice small tree. We have ligustrum bushes next to our back fence and they provide good privacy, nice flowers and some berries for the birds. They are planted about 4' apart and have filled in completely, although we have thinned out the understory a lot so that the azaleas underneath would have more light. Anyway the ligustrum are about 12' high, so they give us 6 feet more privacy than the fence does. I would get them again.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-28-2014, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,483 posts, read 29,425,055 times
Reputation: 11885
Geneyus, I tried to take some decent pics but it's cloudy today and they didn't turn out so great.

Anyways, Wax Myrtle is native here, so these are some that I dug from the woods about 5 years ago. As you can see, one of them has totally engulfed the utility pole. I have never pruned these.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-28-2014, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,483 posts, read 29,425,055 times
Reputation: 11885
This one is a Cherry Laurel, it came up naturally from seed next to this old pecan tree. Probably a good 25' tall.




Honestly, considering how much damage some Ligustrum species (Chinese privet) have done to the environment in the Southeast, I'm hesitant to plant any of them. I know Japanese privet generally isn't as invasive, but still, when I hear Ligustrum I cringe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-29-2014, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,752 posts, read 3,619,409 times
Reputation: 3521
Geneyus,
You want Sweet olive, which smells fantastic, which you want the largest shrubs
you can afford. About 4-5 ft tall you might pay about 15-20 a piece, they are bloomin
now, you will love the fragrance.
You also want Wax myrtle, which will grow fast for you.
Very attractive native tree, and takes a hard pruning easily.
If you have the room, arborvitaes are nice, and you could mix them up
by planting them alternatively, They all play well with others. LOL
The arborvitaes will grow slow, the tea olive will grow slow, so try to get
the largest size you can buy.
Forget the privet, it grows fast, but its something everyone has.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-29-2014, 07:27 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
9,483 posts, read 13,334,142 times
Reputation: 19899
I had Privet in Memphis, it's all over the Berclair n'hood. Hated it. Strong smelling, some love it, some hate it, pollen everywhere. Grows fast but pops up all over the yard, took over the chain link fence at the back of the yard and impossible to get rid of.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2014, 01:11 AM
 
1,964 posts, read 2,381,785 times
Reputation: 1884
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post

Honestly, considering how much damage some Ligustrum species (Chinese privet) have done to the environment in the Southeast, I'm hesitant to plant any of them. I know Japanese privet generally isn't as invasive, but still, when I hear Ligustrum I cringe.

I planted quite a few as a privacy hedge prior to knowing they were invasive and they definitely grew rapidly. Ten years later they are quite large. They are always filled with bees when their flowers are around.


I also have a tea olive, it actually shocked me by growing significantly its first year but was slow after that. I find the aroma of their tiny flowers to be pleasant and sweet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top