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Old 10-01-2014, 08:19 AM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,180,293 times
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It was such a pleasure to see so many of my garden-myth pet peeves addressed in this piece.

10 gardening myths that'll fake you out: George Weigel | PennLive.com
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Old 10-01-2014, 09:56 AM
 
25,631 posts, read 29,117,065 times
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Yup.

Only one I have a problem with is the staking of trees.

A properly staked newly planted tree will always be stronger and have a better chance of flourishing than an unstaked one.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:18 PM
 
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I disagree with the flower bed being more trouble. I have a corner bed with pavers amongst the shasta daisies and daylillies, clematis and other flowers, and I spend less time maintaining this corner than any other part of my yard. FAR less. I don't divide anything - if something is overgrowing I simply pull that part up...done. I don't worry about saving anything. And I don't have to "replace failures" either. Everything grows. I disagree with tree-staking as well.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
16,180 posts, read 7,095,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
I disagree with the flower bed being more trouble. I have a corner bed with pavers amongst the shasta daisies and daylillies, clematis and other flowers, and I spend less time maintaining this corner than any other part of my yard. FAR less. I don't divide anything - if something is overgrowing I simply pull that part up...done. I don't worry about saving anything. And I don't have to "replace failures" either. Everything grows. I disagree with tree-staking as well.
I think it's true that closely planted mature perennials are pretty low maintenance. Especially if mulched. But this also depends on your gardening style, and I don't bother with perennials that require constant fussing, and I appreciate a somewhat wild and tangled look. If you want them all lined up like soldiers looking uniform and tidy, well, yes, that *is* a lot of work.
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Old 10-01-2014, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,752 posts, read 3,622,157 times
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No matter what you post about gardening myths, there is always
someone to say that they don't agree with it.
I say do what works for you.
There are so many variables in gardening, starting with soil
conditons and weather factors, that blanket statements are always
disputed.
If something works for you, and you actually do it, not have just read
about it, then continue with what works.
That is an excellent article Tina, thank you for posting that.
I agree on everything that gardener said.
Of course, I have my own myth debunkles, because I have found some
things untrue also, but I'm keeping them to myself, I'll let people
find out on their own.
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Old 10-02-2014, 01:56 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,180,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
Yup.

Only one I have a problem with is the staking of trees.

A properly staked newly planted tree will always be stronger and have a better chance of flourishing than an unstaked one.
I stake them for one year if they're in danger of being bent over by wind, so yes, I'd agree with you on that one.
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Old 10-02-2014, 02:01 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,180,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Butterfly4u View Post
No matter what you post about gardening myths, there is always
someone to say that they don't agree with it.
I say do what works for you.
There are so many variables in gardening, starting with soil
conditons and weather factors, that blanket statements are always
disputed.
If something works for you, and you actually do it, not have just read
about it, then continue with what works.
That is an excellent article Tina, thank you for posting that.
I agree on everything that gardener said.
Of course, I have my own myth debunkles, because I have found some
things untrue also, but I'm keeping them to myself, I'll let people
find out on their own.
The information in this article is based almost exclusively on proven science. But the fact is, as with many processes, people can do a lot of things wrong and still get a decent result. I used to work in screen printing, was an expert in the science of that method of printing. But as a colleague of mine used to say, "it's a method of printing where you can do everything wrong and still stay in business." Teaching people about the science of printing -- or gardening -- can help them to save time and money, and also understand why things work and don't work.
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Old 10-04-2014, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,474 posts, read 13,410,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
Yup.

Only one I have a problem with is the staking of trees.

A properly staked newly planted tree will always be stronger and have a better chance of flourishing than an unstaked one.
I've read someplace that if a tree is not staked then it will be stimulated to grow stronger roots. I'd need to see scientific evidence about this one, though. I'm not sure what they mean by properly staking, but why do you disagree? I'm just curious.
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Old 10-05-2014, 08:19 AM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,180,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
I've read someplace that if a tree is not staked then it will be stimulated to grow stronger roots. I'd need to see scientific evidence about this one, though. I'm not sure what they mean by properly staking, but why do you disagree? I'm just curious.
When you don't stake a tree, it has to stand on its own against the wind. The staking cables are like training sheels. Without a stake, the tree will grow stronger because it is being challenged by the elements. IOW, it gets more of a workout.

We do stake some trees, but only for a year or so. We had some honeylocusts planted and their trunks were very skinny, and we get some serious wind here in Kansas. One of the stakes came ungrounded and that trunk began to curve a bit. I restaked it, and I had to leave it staked for a couple of years for it to straighten out. But I would normally never do that.
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