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Old 12-08-2014, 11:34 AM
 
Location: I live wherever I am.
1,935 posts, read 3,489,492 times
Reputation: 3217

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Wondering if anyone has done this. I drive around and see all kinds of property that is not being used - as in, it's not wooded and it's overgrown with weeds. Has anyone ever tried asking the owner of such property if he/she can farm on it, with no expectations of a long-range continuing relationship except for "if I start, I expect to be able to continue at least through the harvest of this season"? Did the owner agree to allow you to farm? If yes, how much did you have to pay him/her for the privilege?

(I can't help but think that, if we used all of this unused property for farming, we'd never have to import any food from China again and we'd be able to go fully organic with what we eat.)
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Old 12-08-2014, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
15,560 posts, read 9,584,514 times
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Not all vacant land is suitable for gardening.

But it wouldn't hurt to ask.


You might agree to split the veggies. and definitely get something in writing giving you permission to be there.
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Old 12-08-2014, 12:46 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,386 posts, read 50,562,503 times
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Being in commercial real estate, we would not allow such a use, but if we did, it would require an insurance certificate showing that you had liability insurance covering your use of the property, and naming us as an additional insured. A private owner, especially residential may not realize the risk to them in having someone else use their property without a written agreement and insurance.
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Old 12-08-2014, 03:09 PM
 
Location: I live wherever I am.
1,935 posts, read 3,489,492 times
Reputation: 3217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Being in commercial real estate, we would not allow such a use, but if we did, it would require an insurance certificate showing that you had liability insurance covering your use of the property, and naming us as an additional insured. A private owner, especially residential may not realize the risk to them in having someone else use their property without a written agreement and insurance.
Exactly what would be the risk?

That I might injure myself on the property and sue them?

I know I got nailed on that one when my band was practicing at my church - when the pastor who allowed it got kicked out, the consistory insisted that we get liability insurance because we could fall by tripping over an instrument cable or something like that and then they could be sued.

I'm not that kind of guy. I am intelligent enough and mature enough to know that if I slip and fall on someone's property, it's because I wasn't being careful enough... not because of any fault of the owner. I'm not buying insurance to protect anyone against something that is simply never going to happen. I'm not going to sue someone for my own negligence. The fact that that can be done at all is one of the worst aspects of this country's legal system.
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Old 12-08-2014, 08:40 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,386 posts, read 50,562,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RomaniGypsy View Post
Exactly what would be the risk?

That I might injure myself on the property and sue them?

I know I got nailed on that one when my band was practicing at my church - when the pastor who allowed it got kicked out, the consistory insisted that we get liability insurance because we could fall by tripping over an instrument cable or something like that and then they could be sued.

I'm not that kind of guy. I am intelligent enough and mature enough to know that if I slip and fall on someone's property, it's because I wasn't being careful enough... not because of any fault of the owner. I'm not buying insurance to protect anyone against something that is simply never going to happen. I'm not going to sue someone for my own negligence. The fact that that can be done at all is one of the worst aspects of this country's legal system.
Yes, you could injure yourself and sue, and whether or not you are that kind of guy doesn't matter to a stranger that owns the property. More likely someone else, such as neighborhood kids go there to steal a cucumber or something and gets hurt. Most importantly, the land owner's insurance may prevent such a use. It is unfortunate, but yes, people are quick to sue, and the lawyers are quick to take their case.
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Old 12-08-2014, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
19,879 posts, read 36,379,125 times
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There's also the fact that if you're injured on someone else's property, even by your own action, and you file a claim on YOUR insurance, they are likely to go after the insurance of the person on whose property you were injured, and even possibly sue, depending on the situation, and you will have absolutely nothing to say about it.
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Old 12-08-2014, 09:28 PM
 
Location: I am right here.
4,859 posts, read 3,711,309 times
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I would require a contract for rent, spelling out the specific lease terms, and also require proof of liability insurance.

You would also have to prove to me that you have some basic knowledge of what you are doing.
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
38,673 posts, read 45,016,991 times
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After you get permission, a contract, and insurance then you'll probably have to get city or county zoning approval to farm and maybe an air quality permit and go through other government hoops before you plant your first seed. You might have to bring in water, get a water permit, water allocation etc etc, oh my you'll say when you find out what farmers have to go through.
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:43 PM
 
731 posts, read 1,315,076 times
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Wow, that is all I say. OP, when my husband was alive we did old buddy system a lot. We lived in a small country community. Maybe that's why. But the young farmers helped each other plant corn, soy beans, etc. And helped get crops in by loaning tractors, labor just whatever was needed. I think you are talking about a garden we called a truck patch with oodles of vegetables. People still take their garden to town and sell to the public. If you can get a couple of friends that are interested then try anyway. Try to find old timers that have some area they would rent for a year. Most farmers don't worry about insurance if they can trust you. It is a LOT of work and expense to get going on land that is grown up in weeds. I guess it depends on where you live too. You can always sign a contract to cover all parties.

Cheers
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Old 12-09-2014, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,305 posts, read 10,044,600 times
Reputation: 20460
Around here you can rent acreage. It's not cheap either. Starts around $100 per acre. Most lots require you to farm the entire lot so no matter how many acres it is you're paying for all of them whether or not you use them.

Why not just use your backyard? You could try container gardening if you have a small yard.

Also just because a lot appears to be vacant and weed grown doesn't mean that it really is. We have plenty of lots here that have weeds this year. Next year, they will have corn, cabbage, squash, pumpkins, soybeans, or anything else grown up here. It's very common to let a field rest for a year or two. Soil needs time to recover especially when you grow something like corn.

And if you think growing all of our own food in the US is going to happen, you're dreaming certain things do not grow in this country. Certain things only grow in certain regions. You will never grow a lemon or olive where I live. They don't even make it in greenhouses in the winter unless you heat them and provide lighting to mimic sunlight. Costs are far much.
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