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Old 02-15-2015, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,139,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
I went with cilantro (which I have never had luck with) lemon basil, garlic chives and dill. The laundry room is very light and have flourescent (spelling) lights as well. I will let you know how they do.
Please keep me (us) posted on their progress, nmnita! I'd love to see/hear how they're doing!
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Old 02-15-2015, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,139,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
im going with six varietys and im hoping to get a good crop from them ...beachmel I hope you get a good crop out of those 4 varietys ..
phonelady, please keep me (us) posted on the progress of your 2015 garden. I'd love to see how it goes! Sharing my experience is half the fun, seeing everyone else's experience(s) is the other half!!
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Old 02-16-2015, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,302 posts, read 79,490,574 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickMan7 View Post
Please keep me (us) posted on their progress, nmnita! I'd love to see/hear how they're doing!
ok,,now I have to clear up one thing and I think I know the answer already: my containers (planters from the past years) have some regular top soil in them, if I understand you coreectly I need to toss it all and use nothing but potting soil or can I mix that little bit of dirt with the potting soil just for starters?
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Old 02-17-2015, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,658,725 times
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Phonelady, those tomatoes did AMAZING last year! The Rutgers grew nearly 10 ft tall and the Bushsteaks were huge. The plants didn't get more than 2-1/2 ft tall, and they didn't get as many fruits as I'd hoped, but the Husky cherry toms and the Golden Nuggets produced so much, it was hard to keep up with the picking! The Rutgers though, hands down amazing producer, with a great flavor.

I'm looking for a mid-sized, heavy producing, super flavorful (not too sweet/bland, not too acidic) MEATY tomato. I'm also looking for one that produces in the marine climate of WA state. Yeah, tricky. The hothouse seems to be the only way to go here, for tomatoes and cukes. Anything that requires above 50 deg at night, MUST go into a greenhouse/hothouse.

As for more than 4 varieties, I would LOVE to be able to play with varieties, unfortunately, after gardening for decades, I know this........I will kick myself in the butt, if I experiment too much, and don't focus on getting our canning/freezing crops in.

Producing enough food to supplement my family for the entire year, caused me to completely re-evaluate what I "wasted" space on. For instance, why grow 5 kinds of squash, adding up to 10 squash plants, if we're going to have to give most of it away? Drop it down to 4 and that leaves enough room for a bed of beets or carrots, which will provide at LEAST 14 quarts of canned veggies.

Being THE gardener in the house, and seeing how I also work full time, in the summer, I have to keep my reins pulled in. Nothing is more heartbreaking to me, than starting "experiments", then getting too darned busy to keep them alive. Heck, with my advancing age, I've even switched over to nothing but raised beds, and those beds are getting higher and higher, every year. This year, I'm gonna try to get hubby to help me plumb some of those beds. Ah.....that would be so nice.
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Old 02-17-2015, 05:54 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,110 posts, read 17,652,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmel View Post
Phonelady, those tomatoes did AMAZING last year! The Rutgers grew nearly 10 ft tall and the Bushsteaks were huge. The plants didn't get more than 2-1/2 ft tall, and they didn't get as many fruits as I'd hoped, but the Husky cherry toms and the Golden Nuggets produced so much, it was hard to keep up with the picking! The Rutgers though, hands down amazing producer, with a great flavor.

I'm looking for a mid-sized, heavy producing, super flavorful (not too sweet/bland, not too acidic) MEATY tomato. I'm also looking for one that produces in the marine climate of WA state. Yeah, tricky. The hothouse seems to be the only way to go here, for tomatoes and cukes. Anything that requires above 50 deg at night, MUST go into a greenhouse/hothouse.

As for more than 4 varieties, I would LOVE to be able to play with varieties, unfortunately, after gardening for decades, I know this........I will kick myself in the butt, if I experiment too much, and don't focus on getting our canning/freezing crops in.

Producing enough food to supplement my family for the entire year, caused me to completely re-evaluate what I "wasted" space on. For instance, why grow 5 kinds of squash, adding up to 10 squash plants, if we're going to have to give most of it away? Drop it down to 4 and that leaves enough room for a bed of beets or carrots, which will provide at LEAST 14 quarts of canned veggies.

Being THE gardener in the house, and seeing how I also work full time, in the summer, I have to keep my reins pulled in. Nothing is more heartbreaking to me, than starting "experiments", then getting too darned busy to keep them alive. Heck, with my advancing age, I've even switched over to nothing but raised beds, and those beds are getting higher and higher, every year. This year, I'm gonna try to get hubby to help me plumb some of those beds. Ah.....that would be so nice.
that is awesome beach . I have one dwarf that does awesome every year and quite the prolific producer of cherry size tomatoes and they are the halms gelbe . The never get any bigger than 6-8 inches tall but they sure put out the cherry tomatoes .they are awesome this year for the first time I am growing sweet and neat scarlet and I hope they do as well as halms
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Old 02-17-2015, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,302 posts, read 79,490,574 times
Reputation: 38656
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmel View Post
Phonelady, those tomatoes did AMAZING last year! The Rutgers grew nearly 10 ft tall and the Bushsteaks were huge. The plants didn't get more than 2-1/2 ft tall, and they didn't get as many fruits as I'd hoped, but the Husky cherry toms and the Golden Nuggets produced so much, it was hard to keep up with the picking! The Rutgers though, hands down amazing producer, with a great flavor.

I'm looking for a mid-sized, heavy producing, super flavorful (not too sweet/bland, not too acidic) MEATY tomato. I'm also looking for one that produces in the marine climate of WA state. Yeah, tricky. The hothouse seems to be the only way to go here, for tomatoes and cukes. Anything that requires above 50 deg at night, MUST go into a greenhouse/hothouse.

As for more than 4 varieties, I would LOVE to be able to play with varieties, unfortunately, after gardening for decades, I know this........I will kick myself in the butt, if I experiment too much, and don't focus on getting our canning/freezing crops in.

Producing enough food to supplement my family for the entire year, caused me to completely re-evaluate what I "wasted" space on. For instance, why grow 5 kinds of squash, adding up to 10 squash plants, if we're going to have to give most of it away? Drop it down to 4 and that leaves enough room for a bed of beets or carrots, which will provide at LEAST 14 quarts of canned veggies.

Being THE gardener in the house, and seeing how I also work full time, in the summer, I have to keep my reins pulled in. Nothing is more heartbreaking to me, than starting "experiments", then getting too darned busy to keep them alive. Heck, with my advancing age, I've even switched over to nothing but raised beds, and those beds are getting higher and higher, every year. This year, I'm gonna try to get hubby to help me plumb some of those beds. Ah.....that would be so nice.
Because this is my first serious attempt at container gardening I just ordered a book about container gardening. It is is paperback and gets great reviews from those who have used it. I hope it has good informaion.

The one thing we do not have to worry about here is the weather. Our nights will be above 50 constantly in about another 6 weeks and we have a lot of sunshine. We do have to worry about rain, if we have a dry summer, we could be in trouble. Last year we lost most of our garden (most of us did) by early August. Only the best and most dedicated gardeners could keep their going into Sept. June and July were awesome though. I canned so many tomatoes and made so many pickles I lost tract.

Space isn't our problem, I just want to do the container thing because of my bad back and the weed control.
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Old 02-17-2015, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,139,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
ok,,now I have to clear up one thing and I think I know the answer already: my containers (planters from the past years) have some regular top soil in them, if I understand you coreectly I need to toss it all and use nothing but potting soil or can I mix that little bit of dirt with the potting soil just for starters?
Personally, I would never put any top soil in my containers. Ever. It compacts way too much, which in turn restricts nutrients and oxygen to the plant's roots. A lot of people like to mix in a handful or two of compost, but it can also compact badly in a container. Because most of my containers are self-watering, I just use a peat-based potting mix (which wicks water beautifully) and add a little extra perlite for water retention and aeration. I do the same for my non-self-watering containers. I haven't bought into the whole organic thing, which is my own preference, so I just purchase and use what has proven to work for me.

Potting mix can be reused for many years, so I don't toss it at the end of the season - a relatively large investment up-front, but pays off over subsequent seasons. I pull my small plants, but cut the big warm season plants off at the soil line and let all the main root balls sit all winter. When the weather warms enough, usually in February/March, I go out and rough up the mix in each container and remove the largest chunks of whatever didn't fully decompose. I then top off with new potting mix when I plant.
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Old 02-17-2015, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,139,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmel View Post
Producing enough food to supplement my family for the entire year, caused me to completely re-evaluate what I "wasted" space on. For instance, why grow 5 kinds of squash, adding up to 10 squash plants, if we're going to have to give most of it away? Drop it down to 4 and that leaves enough room for a bed of beets or carrots, which will provide at LEAST 14 quarts of canned veggies.
This is where I need my intervention. I have only been gardening for a few years, increasing in earnest what I've grown each year. I think I'll pretty well max out what I can [physically and mentally] do this year, then modify my numbers beginning next season. If we have good weather and all goes well, I should absolutely have more than my family needs, but I also really love sharing with others. Much of the joy comes from sharing and conversation about the different varieties..

Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmel View Post
Being THE gardener in the house, and seeing how I also work full time, in the summer, I have to keep my reins pulled in. Nothing is more heartbreaking to me, than starting "experiments", then getting too darned busy to keep them alive. Heck, with my advancing age, I've even switched over to nothing but raised beds, and those beds are getting higher and higher, every year. This year, I'm gonna try to get hubby to help me plumb some of those beds. Ah.....that would be so nice.
My limitations were somewhat reached last season with respect to being the only real gardener in my household, as well, on top of working full time and still wanting to take vacations! Like I said, this year will definitely test me on all fronts as far as how much to grow based on what we really need AND what I want to gift. It's a lot of work and investment (money and time) to just give it all away. Until I've got a few more years under my belt, I just won't know what my ideal ratios are and what exactly I need for my household. For this season at the very least, I'm going all in, balls to the wall. If some of the crops fail, it'll kill me, but it'll also teach me to garden within my limits.. Having 90% of the containers on timed drip saves about 95% of the work, so that's a plus. We all learn in our own way what works and what doesn't. It'll be a fun ride figuring it all out!
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Old 02-17-2015, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,139,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Space isn't our problem, I just want to do the container thing because of my bad back and the weed control.
Containers will definitely help with both your back and the weeds. One of the great things about container gardens is portability. I would definitely make sure that whatever containers you use are appropriately sized for whatever you're growing in them, but also that they're not so big you can't move them to another location to take advantage of more sun, more shade, less wind, frost, etc. My biggest containers are Earthboxes, which I tend not to move, but I could do so readily as they are on wheels. The 5-gallon buckets are moved easily with a dolly.
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Old 02-17-2015, 03:04 PM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
2,486 posts, read 1,711,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
ok,,now I have to clear up one thing and I think I know the answer already: my containers (planters from the past years) have some regular top soil in them, if I understand you coreectly I need to toss it all and use nothing but potting soil or can I mix that little bit of dirt with the potting soil just for starters?
Nita,

before you do this I would do a free soil sample and take it into the cooperative extension in Bentonville (near the prison). The guy (Neal Mays, county extension agent) that analyzes your soil is a soil scientist and can tell you way more than you need to know about your soil.

In my opinion, you can easily amend your soil and not have to worry about getting rid of what you have. Add some organic stuff like fallen leaves, some compost from the bentonville compost facility (cheap or free depending on when you get it) and whatever Neal recommends for your soil and you should be ready for the growing season.

Chi
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