U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-25-2015, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,474 posts, read 13,406,838 times
Reputation: 6404

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by aquietpath View Post
Edible Landscaping by Rosalind Creasy has some excellent suggestions on how to landscape with fruits and vegetables. Maybe start that way before converting your entire yard into a food garden?
this
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-26-2015, 10:07 PM
 
857 posts, read 642,452 times
Reputation: 1662
You should consider fruit in the front yard. Blueberries, persimmons, figs and paw paws are some of the most attractive shrubs and trees there are. Your neighbors will envy the look and the HOA will never suspect that you are using your yard for a devious purpose like growing food.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2015, 10:46 PM
 
2,620 posts, read 2,347,199 times
Reputation: 7195
We've been replacing all our lawn with shrubs, flower beds, and vegetables. The vegetable garden was the first section we created over the lawn when we bought this house 8 years ago. We didn't remove the lawn but built raised beds over the top of it. The benefit is that the lawn turns to compost at the bottom of the raised bed and adds nutrients. If you look up "lasagna gardening" you will see the technique for placing raised beds over lawn. Very easy. We converted the existing sprinkler system to drip which has made garden maintenance very effortless.

We haven't had problems with lawn growing back because the raised beds added about a foot of soil over the grass. Around the beds, we laid down weed barrier and filled the area with fine crushed rock.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2015, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
16,179 posts, read 7,095,017 times
Reputation: 9178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
The only sunny spot in my yard with a large 2 story house and 100' fir trees is the side lawn (corner lot). In order to grow a vegetable garden I put in a 7'x12' greenhouse right in the middle of it, and plan enlarge it next spring. With our short growing season, the deer, rabbits and squirrels it's impossible to grow without greenhouse. This is but the 4th year and since we did it several of the neighbors have done the same, some much larger. We still have a front lawn and part of the side for the grandkids to play when they come over. This year we had lettuce, spinach, peas and kale early on, now tomatoes, squash, cucumbers, eggplant and green beans. All in that small space by growing a much as possible tall on bamboo stakes. Well worth it for the pick and eat treat, especially the tomatoes that are like nothing you get at the store or even farmer's market.
Hemlock, how far east?

It's true that anywhere in Washington, you'll grow more with a properly managed structure, but it doesn't *need* to be a full-blown greenhouse. Cold frames work pretty well, and are much less expensive to build and manage.

Both east and west of the Cascades, the limiting factor for year-round growing is our short winter days, and there's not a lot to be done about that. Year-round salad greens are very possible in the Seattle area, it's relatively warm here. But I still use cold frames - to protect the plants and soil from getting too wet!

Check out Northwest Edible Life | life on garden time - a real favorite of mine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2015, 07:55 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,392 posts, read 50,582,032 times
Reputation: 28622
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
Hemlock, how far east?

It's true that anywhere in Washington, you'll grow more with a properly managed structure, but it doesn't *need* to be a full-blown greenhouse. Cold frames work pretty well, and are much less expensive to build and manage.

Both east and west of the Cascades, the limiting factor for year-round growing is our short winter days, and there's not a lot to be done about that. Year-round salad greens are very possible in the Seattle area, it's relatively warm here. But I still use cold frames - to protect the plants and soil from getting too wet!

Check out Northwest Edible Life | life on garden time - a real favorite of mine.
I'm in Sammamish, and at almost 600' elevation. We get more rain and less sun than Seattle, and a lot colder in winter. In my case the greenhouse is as much to keep the deer/squirrels/rabbits out as for the additional heat. We have two young cottontails living in our yard now, and deer munch on our hostas every night. Don't even get me started on the #!%$@$!# squirrels.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2015, 12:49 PM
 
Location: USA
700 posts, read 952,411 times
Reputation: 648
Quote:
Originally Posted by belovenow View Post
Removing lawn and planting food instead (vegetables and herbs, etc) - I heard about this "movement" in places which don't have restrictive HOA rules... doing this basically eliminates the need to care for a useless lawn and replaces it with a yard of function.

Has anyone here ever done this on their property? Any tips/advice for others who want to try it?
I'm planning to do that as well - sheet mulching my lawn one area at a time and converting to a food garden/forest. Luckily, we don't have HOAs to deal with.

Suggestions: I've been reading up on Permaculture principles and it seems like the most sensible, sustainable thing around.
Also sheet mulching, composting and vegetable rotation and cover crops.

I'm just tired of all the pesticides and lawn care needed in having a lawn. All these manicured green lawns are just so boring. I like the English Garden look, but with edible fruits, vegetables and flowers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top