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Old 08-27-2015, 05:04 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,902 times
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Hi guys! I have a few questions to ask about my aloe vera plant & I thought it would be a good idea to start here.

I received an aloe vera plant as a gift about 3 months ago. When I got it home I noticed 2 brown, shriveled up leaves attached at the base & sticking up out of the dirt. I also noticed a broken leaf with a callus on its tip & another leaf just had a brown tip.

I watered it a couple days later for the 1st time. I water my plant once a week & after the 2nd watering it surprised me with pups, one after another & now I have 5 pups. I would have 6 pups but I accidentally broke one off & then another pup sprouted like right where I broke it..

My aloe still grows new leaves & so do my pups. I've noticed a little growth in them every day.

I'm worried about the brown & broken leaves. That one leaf that had the brown tip on it when I first got it has now also shriveled up. I was thinking about pulling those leaves off when when I transplant the pups. Would this be a good idea? Is my plant dying? I read somewhere online that the pups put a lot of stress on the mama plant & that could be why it has brown leaves or not enough water? I'm also a little nervous about transplanting them. Everyone does it different but what is the best way? I really want my plants to survive.

I've attached a photo of my plant now.

Thank you for taking the time to read this.
Attached Thumbnails
Aloe Vera Plant Advice?-img_20150827_165726.jpg  
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Old 08-27-2015, 05:15 PM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
3,048 posts, read 1,821,233 times
Reputation: 9182
You can take scissors and cut off the brown, dried leaves. If you want to remove the pups, you can do that too. I never found that it stressed the mother plant to leave them. Just make sure to give it some regular fertilizer once a month, and keep it watered. This is once succulent that does actually seem to like watering.
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Old 08-27-2015, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
39,008 posts, read 46,129,452 times
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Aloe Vera is one of the easiest plants to grow. Brown tips can be an indication of a salt burn from salts in your water, also fertilizer burn can turn the leaves brown. If the whole leaf turns brown then pull it off. Pups won't hurt the plant when transplanting. When the pups get large enough (usually @ 6 inches) you can separate them and start new plants. Don't overwater them keep moist but not wet. It's better to be on the dry side than wet. Overwatering you'll notice a sudden turning of brown and mushiness of the leaves.
You can Google aloe vera for additional information.
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Old 08-27-2015, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,603 posts, read 12,341,001 times
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I grew up with Aloe as a medicine plant. Got a burn, peel the skin back on a leaf and rub it on the burn. Bad stomach, peel the skin back and eat a leaf. I would pull the bad leaves or arms as some call them as the plant will attempt to heal them and expend too much energy trying to do it. It can bring the entire plant down. If you put them outside in an open yard, be careful as they are highly invasive and will spread like weeds. The only solution is to dig them up. I have a lot of them, about a pickup truck load from just tree or four I left after thinning them 2 years ago. Once established, be careful to not over water them as they will go to rot. If the leaves get soft and mushy, too much water. I live in Texas where it gets to 100F commonly and I only water them once a month. They can be grown in large pots that are able to drain good.
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Old 08-27-2015, 08:51 PM
 
10,032 posts, read 7,995,187 times
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Wish I had one at present! I badly scalded my right hand earlier today - saw the doctor and got it treated, bandaged, and am on meds, so it's better now, but it surely did hurt. First time I've done that in a LONG time...

Aloe versa will not last as outdoor plants after frost, but make good houseplants which enjoy several months of outdoor living in season. They are great to keep in or near kitchens. For minor burns, just break off a leaf or part of a leaf, and apply the gel-like sap inside. It contains a natural pain-killer that is immediately effective. You can also find aloe vera gel at many health food stores. it works better for burn pain than most over-the-counter meds.

Replacing my missing aloe vera plant is on tomorrow's schedule. Congratulations on your prolific plant - you can easily pot the "babies" and pass them along to friends.
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Old 08-28-2015, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Ormond Beach, FL
1,304 posts, read 1,314,795 times
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Treat aloes bad. No food or water and lots of sun. They grow great in my yard which is pure sand and very salty.
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Old 08-29-2015, 09:37 PM
 
32,533 posts, read 29,924,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fredesch View Post
Treat aloes bad. No food or water and lots of sun. They grow great in my yard which is pure sand and very salty.
A couple of years ago I thinned out some aloe vera and tossed them in a bucket to re-pot later on. I decided to conduct an experiment and just left them there. No water. No soil. Just five or six aloe plants in a bucket on the patio.... in the shade. They've doubled in size and are quiet healthy.
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Old 08-31-2015, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,474 posts, read 13,629,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Wish I had one at present! I badly scalded my right hand earlier today - saw the doctor and got it treated, bandaged, and am on meds, so it's better now, but it surely did hurt. First time I've done that in a LONG time...

Aloe versa will not last as outdoor plants after frost, but make good houseplants which enjoy several months of outdoor living in season. They are great to keep in or near kitchens. For minor burns, just break off a leaf or part of a leaf, and apply the gel-like sap inside. It contains a natural pain-killer that is immediately effective. You can also find aloe vera gel at many health food stores. it works better for burn pain than most over-the-counter meds.


Replacing my missing aloe vera plant is on tomorrow's schedule. Congratulations on your prolific plant - you can easily pot the "babies" and pass them along to friends.
Deng deng deng. Nothing beats fresh aloe vera for quickly healing burns. The stuff in the bottle just does not have the same potency. Also OP Lucky you. If it keeps having babies, you may be able to put it in a smaller pot. You can also try to give away or sell the babies. Mine is in a small pot in the window, and it has not had any children.
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Old 08-31-2015, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
5,986 posts, read 8,705,640 times
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Just try to get rid of them, once they get going.

They are heavy with water and slime. They get to be huge. My AZ desert soil grows them without any help at all and I have been pulling them out regularly.
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Old 08-31-2015, 04:42 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,135 posts, read 53,149,732 times
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I let aloe vera rot here just always have too many to care for. They like to be root bound in pots. I have a larger variety in a front garden too. They just do best when left alone. I too have them laying about and still living out of soil for some time.
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