U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-13-2015, 07:18 AM
 
697 posts, read 2,389,621 times
Reputation: 737

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by uncleharley View Post
Is the threat of fire a hazard there? If so, why not create a rock garden on the slope?

uh
Would love rocks but that would definitely be a job for the pros, and probably beaucoup bucks! Looking for a diy project with mainly deciduous shrubs that stay below 2' in height and tolerate dry shade.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-13-2015, 07:27 AM
 
697 posts, read 2,389,621 times
Reputation: 737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ncliving60 View Post
We live in a town nicknamed "Brick city" and usually have to chip out clay rather than dig. We also have a similar slope that needed tending. There is a particular nana version of juniper that likes either sun or partial shade: Juniperus squamata ‘Blue Star’. Requires little pruning and if you buy at Lowes is not expensive. Deer leave it alone, too. I like your idea of the path, maybe diagonally instead of horizontal, perhaps lined with the juniper. Another ground cover you might consider that will do fine in shade is Creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia ‘Aurea’).
Brick city, wow! I can definitely relate! My maddocks is never far away when I'm outside.

Thank you for ideas. I like the idea of a path someplace there just to save us from falls. Why diagonal? Would that be easier to walk on than horizontal? I can tend the hill at the top and the bottom but not the middle, so that is where I need accessibility.

I have lots of creeping Jenny in pots but not sure it's roots would be deep enough to prevent erosion.

Will look closer at that variety of juniper but if it's evergreen it will collect too many leaves.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2015, 07:30 AM
 
697 posts, read 2,389,621 times
Reputation: 737
Quote:
Originally Posted by grampaTom View Post
we had a similar scenario in Oklahoma and planted Vinca. Spread like crazy and held the soil well. Does not need mowing and can be trimmed with the weed-eater as needed. I would think Ivy would also work.
Thanks grampaTom.
We prefer something that grows steadily but is not too vigorous, because of our nearness to the woods. Wouldn't want it escaping.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2015, 07:44 PM
 
66 posts, read 56,124 times
Reputation: 181
Checking the picture again, I can see what you mean about working and needing the horizontal path. The junipers are evergreen, but very tough, so you could rake over them if needed. Another option for erosion prevention could be dwarf nandina. They are very hardy in any soil, drought and deer resistant and provide nice color. A blower would remove any leaves. Trying some of your creeping Jenny on the slope might be a good idea. We have a slope of clay almost completely covered in it. Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2015, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,474 posts, read 13,413,676 times
Reputation: 6404
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinadreamin View Post
Yes to the acid soil. Love all ferns and they would fit in well with our woods. However I'm too anal and the fall leaves that would cover them each autumn would have me trying to blow them out and the hill is just too treacherous. Most of the trees are deciduous and unload all their foliage directly on to the hill. I would be fine planting ferns on the top of the hill where I can tend to them but not the lower areas.

Definitely will not plant anything that could spread to the trees! We love and cherish our woods.
OP don't blow the leaves off of the ferns. You can leave pine straw and leaves on native ferns. It makes great mulch and compost and provides nutrition for the plants: Step Away From That Leaf Blower!

Leaf litter also provides habitat and nurseries for many native insects and even amphibians. No need to blow.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2015, 08:06 PM
 
697 posts, read 2,389,621 times
Reputation: 737
Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
OP don't blow the leaves off of the ferns. You can leave pine straw and leaves on native ferns. It makes great mulch and compost and provides nutrition for the plants: Step Away From That Leaf Blower!

Leaf litter also provides habitat and nurseries for many native insects and even amphibians. No need to blow.
Great point and a good bit of advice for the too perfectionistic among us! Maybe it's time to break out and sing Let It Go!

I would like nothing better than to have something there that actually enjoys its living conditions and therefore does well on its own as you describe.

And ferns spread, allowing us to start small, and watch it fill in naturally. They would also deter deer nibbling and the evergreen varieties would offer winter interest.

Thank you for such help. Just what I was needing! Great article too. I'm the odd one who likes spiders, frogs and bugs of all kinds so right up my alley.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2015, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Venice, FL
1,707 posts, read 1,058,875 times
Reputation: 2692
How about Asiatic jasmine? I think it's a perfect fit.

Greetings from Earth: Vigorous Ground Cover = Asiatic Jasmine
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2015, 01:42 PM
 
697 posts, read 2,389,621 times
Reputation: 737
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlking58 View Post
How about Asiatic jasmine? I think it's a perfect fit.

Greetings from Earth: Vigorous Ground Cover = Asiatic Jasmine
OK now I'm scared! Anytime someone uses the words Devil Vine I have to pay attention. Already have devil grass (Bermuda) so would have to pass on this one. Thank you for the suggestion. Know of anything as effective with less brimstone?

PlantFiles: Detailed information on Asiatic Jasmine, Asian Jasmine Trachelospermum asiaticum
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2015, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,506 posts, read 29,454,867 times
Reputation: 11907
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinadreamin View Post
OK now I'm scared! Anytime someone uses the words Devil Vine I have to pay attention. Already have devil grass (Bermuda) so would have to pass on this one. Thank you for the suggestion. Know of anything as effective with less brimstone?

PlantFiles: Detailed information on Asiatic Jasmine, Asian Jasmine Trachelospermum asiaticum
Its not that bad, I have it planted under some trees. Its very popular down here. Its nothing like Wisteria or Kudzu.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2015, 02:41 PM
 
3,272 posts, read 1,946,787 times
Reputation: 6289
Spearmint? Spreads easily, grows in shade or sun, has pretty purple flowers that attract bees and hummingbirds, leaves smell great. I have a couple patches of it and love it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top