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Old 09-17-2015, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Il
386 posts, read 197,272 times
Reputation: 112

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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
Is it in Denver proper? I've never seen one here.

Growing up in Kansas City, you'll see them, but they tend to get dieback every few year. My grandfather had one and tried to get rid of it for years lol! You can chop them down and they come right back. In Denver, I would think of them almost more as a shrub since they'd get killed back so many winters.
I have a feeling they'd do alright in Denver. We had some here that had no die back in the winter of 2013/2014. We got down to -13 F twice and spent 1 whole day where the temps never rose above 0 F.
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Old 09-18-2015, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,361 posts, read 40,424,274 times
Reputation: 46656
Lord these are trash trees. yes the flowers are pretty but they send up suckers all through the yard, break off, stink and are invasive.

Best Trees to Plant : HGTV Gardens
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Old 09-18-2015, 10:23 PM
 
Location: CO
2,458 posts, read 2,348,660 times
Reputation: 5144
Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
Is it in Denver proper? I've never seen one here.

Growing up in Kansas City, you'll see them, but they tend to get dieback every few year. My grandfather had one and tried to get rid of it for years lol! You can chop them down and they come right back. In Denver, I would think of them almost more as a shrub since they'd get killed back so many winters.
It's at the northwest corner of Arapahoe Rd. And S. Franklin Street. Easy to see when you're waiting for the traffic light. It's more like a bush now with the dieback but it is blooming.
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Old 09-19-2015, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Floribama
12,971 posts, read 28,576,156 times
Reputation: 11033
The problem with planting them in colder areas is that eventually the species starts adapting to it and will be able to survive without dieback. Just a bad idea IMO.
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Old 09-19-2015, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,361 posts, read 40,424,274 times
Reputation: 46656
No matter how much those of us with experience with the trashiness and invasiveness of mimosas protest, there are those who insist "it's my land and I'll plant what I want and besides the pretty pink flowers are so nice!"

Still their future generations will pay the price.
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Old 09-19-2015, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Il
386 posts, read 197,272 times
Reputation: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
No matter how much those of us with experience with the trashiness and invasiveness of mimosas protest, there are those who insist "it's my land and I'll plant what I want and besides the pretty pink flowers are so nice!"

Still their future generations will pay the price.
What I've notice in my area is that the trees create lots of seedling just like in the south. But once you mow them down, they die. Central Illinois doesn't have a lot of land that doesn't get mowed or cut. Farm fields are turned over, the sides of the highways get mowed. The only place they can get a foothold is in places that they won't get cut down.
I would imagine that they are more of a problem in places like Tennessee because there is so much rocky land where it is not feasible to mow. They have very little chance of becoming invasive here.

Come on, admit it! You'd miss them if you couldn't see a mimosa every once in awhile.
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Old 09-20-2015, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Floribama
12,971 posts, read 28,576,156 times
Reputation: 11033
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
No matter how much those of us with experience with the trashiness and invasiveness of mimosas protest, there are those who insist "it's my land and I'll plant what I want and besides the pretty pink flowers are so nice!"

Still their future generations will pay the price.
I'm used to seeing Mimosa growing everywhere here on the coastal plain (along with invasive tallow trees, privet, etc.), but what's saddening for me is seeing them grow in the Appalachians. I've seen them growing right out of the mountainsides in the Smokies, and they totally clash with the landscape there.
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Old 09-21-2015, 08:27 AM
 
Location: God's Country
4,370 posts, read 2,791,847 times
Reputation: 6982
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuja1 View Post
Come on, admit it! You'd miss them if you couldn't see a mimosa every once in awhile.
Had one right outside my gym window. Wife loved to watch the hummingbirds and butterflies feed on the nectar as she went through the drudgery of the treadmill. Those flowers really did attract the hummers big time. Tree lived for 36 years before dying. Pods were messy clogging up the rain gutters though.
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Old 09-21-2015, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Il
386 posts, read 197,272 times
Reputation: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
Had one right outside my gym window. Wife loved to watch the hummingbirds and butterflies feed on the nectar as she went through the drudgery of the treadmill. Those flowers really did attract the hummers big time. Tree lived for 36 years before dying. Pods were messy clogging up the rain gutters though.
The most pesky plant we have here in Central IL, in my opinion, is the silver maple. Giant ugly branches, helicopter seed pods all over the place, seedlings sprouting up everywhere. It's only redeeming quality is shade and fast growth. If I lived somewhere that didn't have them, I might miss seeing one every now and again, just for the memories. But I can think of other deciduous trees I'd rather see.
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Old 09-21-2015, 01:36 PM
 
Location: God's Country
4,370 posts, read 2,791,847 times
Reputation: 6982
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuja1 View Post
The most pesky plant we have here in Central IL, in my opinion, is the silver maple. Giant ugly branches, helicopter seed pods all over the place, seedlings sprouting up everywhere. It's only redeeming quality is shade and fast growth. If I lived somewhere that didn't have them, I might miss seeing one every now and again, just for the memories. But I can think of other deciduous trees I'd rather see.
Agree. Fortunately, they're not that "pesky" here.
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