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Old 01-06-2018, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Floribama
12,092 posts, read 27,345,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
I see one growing quite successfully down the street from me in a Boston suburb.


I suspect that there are varieties of mimosa just as there are varieties of all plants, some of which would be more or less cold hardy.


I am from the South; have usually had mimosa trees; and for the life of me I cannot understand why so many people hate them. I think the pink flowers are pretty and the seed pods aren't worse than a lot of other things.


Have you ever stepped barefoot on one of those spiky pods from a sweet gum? How about the 100,000 acorns your live oak drops every fall? Ever had a lawn mower pick up and throw a burr oak acorn? Or a black walnut? Pecan trees always get bagworms, yuk, and drop branches all over the place. Cottonwoods make cotton. Bois d'arc make horseapples. Peach trees attract wasps which will end up getting into more of the fruit than you ever will. And so on and so on.
Mimosa is invasive and has zero benefit to wildlife. They just take up valuable space where more beneficial trees could be growing.
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Old 01-06-2018, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
6,055 posts, read 4,002,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cuja1 View Post
Has anyone ever tried growing mimosas in zones 4 or colder?
We had volunteers all around our yard in south central PA. Some got over 10 feet.
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Old 01-06-2018, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
11,771 posts, read 8,898,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurse Bishop View Post
I'm with you Turf. I love Mimosas, I have two trees and we live in Texas...
Apparently, Texans are also fond of Chinese Tallow, another invasive species.
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Old 01-07-2018, 12:44 PM
 
485 posts, read 206,665 times
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The Tallow tree still has its yellow berries in the winter. Almost like a Christmas decoration.
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Old 01-08-2018, 02:09 PM
 
1,958 posts, read 762,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Mimosa is invasive and has zero benefit to wildlife. They just take up valuable space where more beneficial trees could be growing.
What do you mean exactly, "invasive"? Do you mean it drops seeds that then sprout into little trees? Thank goodness maples, oaks, live oaks, catalpa, black walnut, pecan, horse chestnut, and crab apples don't drop fruits or nuts that then sprout into little trees - oh, wait...

Or is it just that you have read somewhere that mimosa is an undesirable tree, whereas live oak is a desirable tree, so you are now repeating it?
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Old 01-08-2018, 02:40 PM
 
485 posts, read 206,665 times
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I googled it.

" Introduction. Originally from China, Mimosa or Silk tree was introduced to the United States in 1745 and cultivated since the 18th century primarily for use as an ornamental. Mimosa remains a popular ornamental because of its fragrant and showy flowers."
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Old 01-08-2018, 02:43 PM
 
485 posts, read 206,665 times
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It is considered invasive because it can reproduce itself. How many other non native plants in the US can reproduce themselves? Shall they all be considered invasive? Human beings are an invasive species native to Africa.
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Old 01-08-2018, 03:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurse Bishop View Post
It is considered invasive because it can reproduce itself. How many other non native plants in the US can reproduce themselves? Shall they all be considered invasive? Human beings are an invasive species native to Africa.
Should we exterminate the honey bee in North America, as it is an artificially introduced species that has spread over the entire continent in just 400 years? It has probably displaced native insects as well.
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Old 01-08-2018, 03:57 PM
 
1,958 posts, read 762,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
We had volunteers all around our yard in south central PA. Some got over 10 feet.
If you don't want them just mow over the seedlings. Just like you do with the little oak forest that comes up under each of your "desirable" oak trees. (Don't get me wrong, I like oak trees, but this idea that certain unfashionable trees are "trash trees" is total and unmitigated BS.)
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Old 01-08-2018, 04:00 PM
 
1,958 posts, read 762,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
zero benefit to wildlife.
So I suppose birds that attempt to nest or perch fall softly dead from the branches, bees that attempt to nest in a hollow mimosa branch go berserk and attack the nearest human, squirrels that run up a branch to get a better look are instantly struck by lightning and vaporized, and wherever a mimosa tree has grown the ground shall be fallow as if sown with salt, for seven generations.
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