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Old 01-08-2018, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,449 posts, read 9,453,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurse Bishop View Post
It is considered invasive because it can reproduce itself...
That's not the definition of an invasive species. Look it up.
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Old 01-09-2018, 09:09 AM
 
737 posts, read 341,773 times
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" and that has a tendency to spread to a degree believed to cause damage to the environment, human economy or human health."

Yes, the environment is dammaged by all these shade trees with fluffy pink flowers, the lumber industry is going broke from mimosas taking over the timber lands, and people are getting sick with continuous low grade stress from having to tolerate their neighbor's choice in landscape tree selection.
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Old 01-09-2018, 09:21 AM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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They are at least as far north as 55N in northern England.
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Old 01-09-2018, 12:29 PM
 
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They popped up all over my yard from Neighbors tree's in Zone 6a. They do spread and I can certainly see why they are considered invasive. They do grow quickly, but rarely last more than 20 years around here. After a really cold spell in some winters you would see several standing dead.
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Old 01-11-2018, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurse Bishop View Post
...Yes, the environment is dammaged [sic] by all these shade trees with fluffy pink flowers, the lumber industry is going broke from mimosas taking over the timber lands, and people are getting sick with continuous low grade stress from having to tolerate their neighbor's choice in landscape tree selection.
Well, when they run amok in a neighboring field, and the developer has to remove them to develop the property, they are negatively impacting the development cost.
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Old 01-11-2018, 06:15 PM
 
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The developer has to scrape off the property anyway.
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Old 01-11-2018, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Floribama
12,638 posts, read 28,057,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
What do you mean exactly, "invasive"? Do you mean it drops seeds that then sprout into little trees? Thank goodness maples, oaks, live oaks, catalpa, black walnut, pecan, horse chestnut, and crab apples don't drop fruits or nuts that then sprout into little trees - oh, wait...

Or is it just that you have read somewhere that mimosa is an undesirable tree, whereas live oak is a desirable tree, so you are now repeating it?
Research every one of those species you listed and you’ll see how they benefit native wildlife. Where I live invasives like Mimosa, Privet, and Tallow grow out of control and prevent regeneration of native pine species, which totally ruins forested areas.

Invasive Plants
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Old 01-11-2018, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,449 posts, read 9,453,484 times
Reputation: 27993
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurse Bishop View Post
The developer has to scrape off the property anyway.
It was already "scraped" prior to those fluffy-flowered, misfits running amok. Give it up; mimosas are a known and proven nuisance.
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Old 01-12-2018, 08:17 AM
 
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http://www.ina.fr/video/I00013030


these mimosas , a hardy bunch, grow on an island on the French north Atlantic coast, as far north as 47° Latitude! unbelievable!
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Old 01-12-2018, 09:41 AM
 
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I know that mimosas are considered invasive, but in our area (SW Ohio) if you compare it to Chinese honeysuckle (literally taking over wooded areas, along highways, nearly ubiquitous) mimosa is barely reproducing.

Does it drop a lot of seeds? Yes. Most of those seeds do not lead to new plants. The mimosa does not prevent other plants from growing under/around it (the Chinese honeysuckle creates such a dense canopy, it prevents other seedlings from being established it underneath it).

Which doesn't mean that it's a good plant; just that it is as it's sold - an ornamental that isn't native to the area.

Much like Japanese maples.

Or Crimson King Maples, or Norway Maples. Or the Pear abomination.

As far as usefulness to wildlife, our mimosa is home to numerous (I have counted up to 10) ruby throated hummingbirds during the summers. The prolific blossoms lead to a months long feeding frenzy by the hummers - at a time when most other flowering shrubs (including natives) are long done. Their summertime flowering is specifically why I like the plant, and apparently the hummers share my appreciation.

We've had several nests and often find the hummers perching on the tree squeaking at one another (or at me, more likely).

The tree itself provides a filtered light (shade, but not total shade) and from that perspective is helpful in cooling the surrounding area, appreciated by humans and wildlife alike during our hot/humid summers.

Unfortunately, from what we've seen, the trees are fast growers (undoubtedly another reason they are considered invasive) and like many fast growers - prone to breakage in storms. For that reason, you rarely see very large trees, and most people suggest the useful life is in the neighborhood of 30ish years.

We'll enjoy it while we have it. Will we plant another when it's gone? Perhaps, we'll see what the environment is like at that time.
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