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Old 01-12-2018, 12:37 PM
 
2,559 posts, read 1,006,163 times
Reputation: 6434

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The thing is, people read an opinion that such and such a plant is "invasive" or some other term of opprobrium, never evaluate why someone might print such a thing (it couldn't be that they're trying to sell other plants, could it? NAAAAHHHH...) and they just repeat this without ever evaluating the claims for themselves. More than one person here has described ways in which mimosa trees are not really worse than other types of trees that are currently described as "desirable".

I remember when Bradford Pear was the fad; the oh-so-much-more-desirable tree than, say, fruitless mulberry. Now it's anathema. I remember when red tip photinia was the fad; oh-so-desirable. Now it too is anathema. I remember when Neal Sperry had everyone ripping out their 50 year old hedges that hid their foundations, replacing them with the little clumps of stuff with bare dirt in between, that instantly become totally infiltrated with lawn grass. Ever tried to pull Bermuda grass out of a 75 foot long planting bed?

I remember when waxleaf ligustrum was the fad; then when it was anathema; then it was the fad again. Is it still in fashion, or is it out again? I haven't kept up.

There is nothing wrong with a mimosa tree if you recognize what it is and what it isn't and don't expect it to be something other than it is.

And as far as "invasive" (which I haven't seen a good explanation of how mimosa is "invasive", unlike say trumpet vine, bamboo, or kudzu), if seedlings sprouting up under the tree is "invasive" then I defy you to find me a tree where that doesn't happen. Only someone who has never seen the little forests of oak or live oak seedlings that spring up under each of those "currently highly desirable" trees would characterize mimosa as "invasive" by comparison.
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Old 01-12-2018, 01:26 PM
 
33 posts, read 9,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
I know that mimosas are considered invasive, but in our area (SW Ohio) if you compare it to Chinese honeysuckle (literally taking over wooded areas, along highways, nearly ubiquitous) mimosa is barely reproducing.

Does it drop a lot of seeds? Yes. Most of those seeds do not lead to new plants. The mimosa does not prevent other plants from growing under/around it (the Chinese honeysuckle creates such a dense canopy, it prevents other seedlings from being established it underneath it).
Ugh, don't get me started on Chinese Ailanthus tree's. Those make mimosa's seem like unicorns and rainbows sprouting from the ground. Talk about invasive, Ailanthus have literally started taking over everywhere I look. There is even an older 3 story brick building that I pass on my way to and from work that has one growing from the chimney. It sticks a good 10 feet out the top of the chimney. I can see why it inspired the "Tree grows in Brooklyn", things will grow anywhere and everywhere.
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Old 01-12-2018, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,449 posts, read 9,449,402 times
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Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
...There is nothing wrong with a mimosa tree if you recognize what it is and what it isn't and don't expect it to be something other than it is...
There's a lot wrong with them if you live down here, in Dixie. For those who have septic systems, the extensive root systems are a nightmare. In fact, sprouts from a mimosa's root system can create thickets of mimosa trees. Also, if you cut mimosa trees down they will keep sprouting and growing.
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Old 01-12-2018, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Floribama
12,636 posts, read 28,050,353 times
Reputation: 10440
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
The thing is, people read an opinion that such and such a plant is "invasive" or some other term of opprobrium, never evaluate why someone might print such a thing (it couldn't be that they're trying to sell other plants, could it? NAAAAHHHH...) and they just repeat this without ever evaluating the claims for themselves.
I’m not going by anything I have read, believe me I have spent countless hours cutting the darned things down and burning them, and having to constantly spray the root sprouts and seedlings with Crossbow.

Besides, most of the literature about Mimosa being invasive is from universities and state forestry services, which has nothing to do with selling plants.
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