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Old 09-10-2015, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Il
386 posts, read 214,025 times
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Has anyone ever tried growing mimosas in zones 4 or colder?
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Old 09-10-2015, 03:50 PM
 
Location: NC
6,081 posts, read 7,044,848 times
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Google result: grows zone 6 to 9.
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Old 09-10-2015, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Il
386 posts, read 214,025 times
Reputation: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
Google result: grows zone 6 to 9.
I know most sources say that they are good up to zone 6. But there is a variety supposedly hardy to zone 5. I actually live on the border of zone 5b/6a and we have quite a few mimosas here, I've seen them here since 1997 at least. I have even heard reports that they have been grown in Peoria IL (zone 5b was 5a). So they obviously grow in zone 5 or at least parts of it. But I wonder if they have considered some of the winters that can occur in zone 5. In the 70's and 80's we had winters similar to what Minneapolis has now. Somehow I don't think a mimosa could take that.
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Old 09-10-2015, 05:57 PM
 
Location: CO
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I know of exactly one mimosa in our zone 5 area. We had a historic polar plunge last fall when the high temp was 80 degrees but fell to -20 that night. A lot of plants and trees turned up dead in the spring. The mimosa had a lot of dieback but I've noticed as I drive by it that there are some branches that survived and are flowering. So apparently it's possible but zone 4 weather all winter could be a killer.

No one takes any care of that tree because all the dead branches are still there long after most everyone had removed the dieback on their property. I'm pretty sure the people who live there have no idea it's an anomaly in our area.
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Old 09-10-2015, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Il
386 posts, read 214,025 times
Reputation: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
I know of exactly one mimosa in our zone 5 area. We had a historic polar plunge last fall when the high temp was 80 degrees but fell to -20 that night. A lot of plants and trees turned up dead in the spring. The mimosa had a lot of dieback but I've noticed as I drive by it that there are some branches that survived and are flowering. So apparently it's possible but zone 4 weather all winter could be a killer.

No one takes any care of that tree because all the dead branches are still there long after most everyone had removed the dieback on their property. I'm pretty sure the people who live there have no idea it's an anomaly in our area.
It's weird, I think they are exotic and stick out among the common deciduous trees found in my area, but many people never give them a second glance. One good thing about mimosas is that if the trunk dies, new ones usually grow back quickly. Mine grew over 8 feet this year. The bad thing is I have 2 I'm trying to get rid of, but nothing short of digging it out of the ground or poisoning it will stop the danged thing.

Can I ask what city it's in? I'd like to check the weather temps they had in that area over the whole winter.
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Old 09-11-2015, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Floribama
13,527 posts, read 29,479,721 times
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They're invasive garbage trees down here... pretty when blooming, but ugly the rest of the year. Those seed pods hanging during the winter aren't a pretty sight. You'll never see a Mimosa in an upscale neighborhood.
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Old 09-11-2015, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Il
386 posts, read 214,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
They're invasive garbage trees down here... pretty when blooming, but ugly the rest of the year. Those seed pods hanging during the winter aren't a pretty sight. You'll never see a Mimosa in an upscale neighborhood.
I've noticed that in the south and other places where they are common, they seem to be hated. They are more of a novelty here though. The trees I consider garbage trees here are silver maples, elms, and mulberry bushes. I would have them completely removed from the city if I could. Leave them out in rural areas.
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Old 09-15-2015, 05:25 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,181 posts, read 1,575,539 times
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The People who have posted info on Mimosa Trees here have a good point, they are not reliably hardy beyond zones 5 or 6.
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Old 09-16-2015, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Il
386 posts, read 214,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
The People who have posted info on Mimosa Trees here have a good point, they are not reliably hardy beyond zones 5 or 6.
I think you are right. But I was wondering how much cold one can take, especially the "Ernest Wilson" variety. If it is really a zone 5 plant I would think it could take at least an average zone 4 winter.
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Old 09-17-2015, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,514,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
I know of exactly one mimosa in our zone 5 area. We had a historic polar plunge last fall when the high temp was 80 degrees but fell to -20 that night. A lot of plants and trees turned up dead in the spring. The mimosa had a lot of dieback but I've noticed as I drive by it that there are some branches that survived and are flowering. So apparently it's possible but zone 4 weather all winter could be a killer.

No one takes any care of that tree because all the dead branches are still there long after most everyone had removed the dieback on their property. I'm pretty sure the people who live there have no idea it's an anomaly in our area.
Is it in Denver proper? I've never seen one here.

Growing up in Kansas City, you'll see them, but they tend to get dieback every few year. My grandfather had one and tried to get rid of it for years lol! You can chop them down and they come right back. In Denver, I would think of them almost more as a shrub since they'd get killed back so many winters.
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