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Old 10-13-2015, 10:27 PM
 
Location: CO
2,456 posts, read 2,442,363 times
Reputation: 5160

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My critters are a little bigger than yours - mice, voles, snakes, etc. I'm sick of them. I've always enjoyed a garden that runs rampant but now I'm paying for my sins. Too much cover, too many hiding places. I'm seriously thinking of re-doing my entire terrace, ripping out all the ground covers and lushly spreading plants and including taking out the little sunken pond which seems to be a big attractant. A little more order might be a good thing. As for those spiders you mention, ohmigosh no! Glad to say I've never seen such a thing.
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Old 10-13-2015, 10:55 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,022 posts, read 25,817,479 times
Reputation: 39478
I didn't plant them. They have been at two different houses I bought. Quaking aspen. Such a beautiful tree. One of the most beautiful, but they send up root suckers like crazy. They are a very aggressive spreader.
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Old 10-13-2015, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Niagara Region
1,298 posts, read 1,424,090 times
Reputation: 4413
Gooseneck loosestrife is my nemesis. Before I bought it, someone else who grows it, in another country but only 3 miles from me, told me it was very easy to pull out. I haven't found one instance of that ease. It loves to anchor itself into every part of my garden and is even growing up through some of my ornamental grasses. It's even growing in dry shade, lol.


The nightmares in my garden, left to me by the previous owner -- vinca, houttuynia cordata (chameleon plant), mint, sorrel, oregano. Of those, the mint is the worst. I had the entire bed dug out and the soil replaced 4 years ago and its baaaaaa--aaack.

I am so jealous reading some of the other posts here. I would LOVE to be overrun by beebalm and four o'clocks!!
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Old 10-13-2015, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Midvale, Idaho
1,428 posts, read 2,256,342 times
Reputation: 1826
I have started over in so many yards. To think I did this to myself all on my own. LOL. I am still able to take care of the yard but time is flying by and some times I wonder what will come of it as I age further. And here I am planting even more of the blasted hollyhocks. But I am hoping to just cut them down in place every year and let them make mulch.

I only see a snake once in awhile and I am only fearful of the rattle snakes. We DO have a great big deer critter coming in every night. I think he/she is spending the night munching on what is left of the garden and morning glories. I am fine with it. Will save me some clean up when the big killing frost hits. Ha it is deer season and neighbors are hosting several hunters and here the deer is in our yard hiding out.

The little water feature in my patio area is just a smallish rubber tank with a fountain in it. It is almost time to drain it and flip it over for winter. The little frogs need to go to bed. Evening conversation between hubby and I . Him to me Why are you leaving the porch light on. I say I am feeding the frogs the light bugs. He walks away shaking his head speechless. But REALLY the frogs hang out on the side of the house by the porch light to catch their dinner. I think they are neat and make such big noise for such little guys. This year I do have a much larger frog than I have ever had but I do not think it is a bull frog.

I plan on being brutal ripping out next spring. I WANT to see my garden decor and not have the plants over take it.

Good luck getting rid of your critters.
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Old 10-14-2015, 03:47 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,150 posts, read 3,652,621 times
Reputation: 13572
Everyone sounds quite experienced here with invasive plants, so I'm going to ask you what I can plant in VERY poor soil that will come up and cover the ground no matter what? We get well below freezing temps here, so I need something that will be hearty enough to withstand cold and snow. Ugh, don't even like typing that 4 letter word lol.

I have an area that is bare looking at a point of our driveway, FAR, FAR from any flower beds and I'd like to find something pleasant looking that will cover this area. It can be as invasive as it wants to be LOL.

We already have too much grass to mow, so I'm looking for an alternative that is nice looking.
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Old 10-14-2015, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
1,257 posts, read 637,156 times
Reputation: 1431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
I have to agree with this sentiment, especially when it comes to the more attractive "roamers." I never know where a hollyhock will pop up and what color it will be. Nicotiana sylvestris (giant flowering tobacco) is another one. Last year it pretty much blocked my access to the hose faucet and this year it decided to take root on either side of the sidewalk. Had to cut it back a bit to hold down the annoyance factor to the mailman. I don't regret planting either of these originally, but like I said earlier - mint. No redeeming quality for me.
The mint has never gotten out of control for me. I have 4 different types and use them in the kitchen. For the more aggressive types, I pull a plant every time I want to use it. The less aggressive types (like my Vietnamese mint) I trim back to use. This way, they've all only spread a a few feet from where I originally planted them. I wish they'd spread a bit more, actually!
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Old 10-14-2015, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
1,257 posts, read 637,156 times
Reputation: 1431
Quote:
Originally Posted by gouligann View Post
Everyone sounds quite experienced here with invasive plants, so I'm going to ask you what I can plant in VERY poor soil that will come up and cover the ground no matter what? We get well below freezing temps here, so I need something that will be hearty enough to withstand cold and snow. Ugh, don't even like typing that 4 letter word lol.

I have an area that is bare looking at a point of our driveway, FAR, FAR from any flower beds and I'd like to find something pleasant looking that will cover this area. It can be as invasive as it wants to be LOL.

We already have too much grass to mow, so I'm looking for an alternative that is nice looking.
Mint?

Actually, though, if you are in south central or south east Canada, you could always do a prairie planting there. Some of the plants I mentioned are perfect for colonizing poor soils - purple coneflower, black eyed susans, asters, prairie dropseed, bluestem, butterfly weed. Once they are established, they don't need supplementary watering, which would be a benefit too, since it sounds like this is far from your house and hose. You may have meant something more ground cover-like, but where I live it is quite popular to plant little patches of prairie. You see them springing up all over the place, and they look quite cheery.
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Old 10-14-2015, 07:53 AM
 
3,273 posts, read 1,952,420 times
Reputation: 6302
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ncliving60 View Post
Such a fun topic!

Mine was a moonflower vine. Two sweet little seeds--I had read of the possibilities, but planted them anyway, thinking "What can it hurt, since the freezing temps will keep it in check?" Obviously that was all the thinking I did before plopping those things in the ground in front of our white privacy fence. The result was lovely. The perfume and the beautiful white blooms were splendid! But 4 years later, I think there is still brown residue from that monster, clinging to the fence.

After frost, cutting away its cold dead body and dragging it to the compost pile was more effort than all the remaining garden required. It must have weighed 75 pounds!! And did I mention the seed pods!?! Holy cow! I spent hours making certain not a single seed remained. There have been others, many that were mentioned above, but none to compare to the moonflower.

Oh, but I forget the canna...
Every year, I plant 2 moonflower vines in pots and train them up an arching trellis. I love moonflowers. But yeah, those vines!!!! What I do works out well. In the fall, I cut down the vines and toss the plant that's in the pot. I haven't had any problem with "volunteers" the next year. I assume we are talking about the same plant and you aren't referring to datura, which are sometimes called moonflowers as well, but they don't have a vining habit.
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Old 10-14-2015, 07:57 AM
 
3,273 posts, read 1,952,420 times
Reputation: 6302
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJSinger View Post
Coneflowers. Even when I deadhead them right away, they still manage to multiply exponentially and strangle everything around them.

OP, I was surprised to read that bees and hummingbirds were not attracted to your bee balm (monarda). I have monarda and, while they are invasive, they attract tons of honeybees, bumblebees and hummingbirds to my yard. Fortunately, I planted mine in a separate section of the yard, so they have not choked out the plants in my main garden.

.
I cannot get coneflowers to grow! There must be something wrong with me! It's very strange, as I know they are hardy.

Bees and hummers are attracted to a lot of things in my garden, but given their druthers, they don't choose the monarda. Bees and butterflies adore my anise hyssop and become quite "tame" when they are on it. Ooops, anise hyssop. There's another of my favorite plants that would take over the world if it could.
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Old 10-14-2015, 08:02 AM
 
3,273 posts, read 1,952,420 times
Reputation: 6302
Quote:
Originally Posted by gouligann View Post
Everyone sounds quite experienced here with invasive plants, so I'm going to ask you what I can plant in VERY poor soil that will come up and cover the ground no matter what? We get well below freezing temps here, so I need something that will be hearty enough to withstand cold and snow. Ugh, don't even like typing that 4 letter word lol.

I have an area that is bare looking at a point of our driveway, FAR, FAR from any flower beds and I'd like to find something pleasant looking that will cover this area. It can be as invasive as it wants to be LOL.

We already have too much grass to mow, so I'm looking for an alternative that is nice looking.
Spearmint for sure, although it will be tall. Lily of the valley is lower and might do the trick. And violets! Ugh. They don't care how poor the soil is or how little rain we get. They just keep on truckin'.
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