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Old 10-15-2015, 03:17 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,542 posts, read 42,708,506 times
Reputation: 57189

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I know some people think of them as a scourge, and others think of them as the backbone of a garden (me).
I have bought daylilies from Smokey's Daylilies, and it is great the way I can sort them by the exact application I want. I am in the south, so I sort by repeat bloomers, height, evergreen, and color. It is an awesome resource.
I am new to the south, and many plants that I had great success with have been failures here. Daylilies have been successful at both places, so I am a booster.
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Old 10-15-2015, 06:13 PM
 
Location: rain city
2,956 posts, read 11,042,170 times
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I like to call them garden thugs. They will gang up and take over the rest of their garden neighbors.

They're ok. Their limited bloom season is a drawback though, and when they're not in bloom they just look weedy.
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Old 10-15-2015, 06:20 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,542 posts, read 42,708,506 times
Reputation: 57189
Quote:
Originally Posted by azoria View Post
I like to call them garden thugs. They will gang up and take over the rest of their garden neighbors.

They're ok. Their limited bloom season is a drawback though, and when they're not in bloom they just look weedy.
My point exactly, is that I have planted the repeat bloomers in my south facing southern garden, and I have had carefree blooms all summer. What's the beef?
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Old 10-15-2015, 10:12 PM
 
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Theyre yummy...so any extras you can eat em....flowers are great for garnish
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Old 10-16-2015, 10:51 AM
 
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We bought a few plain ol' daylilies decades ago. By dividing them, we now have clusters all over the front and back yards, and you can't kill 'em with a stick.

So, daylilies, yay.
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Old 10-16-2015, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,752 posts, read 3,620,656 times
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gentle,
The one plant to use for soil erosion is the daylily. The best investment in my garden I ever made.
I enjoy the flowers, but they certainly help hold the soil on a hill if anyone has a problem with erosion.
And, also, they live through anything. The plants I have aren't watered as much as they should be,
but they come right back after a rain.
I never had a daylily til I moved to South Carolina. Now, I swear by them.
I can't imagine the erosion I would have without them. Ornamental grasses are alright,
but the daylily is actually more hardy for me.
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Old 10-16-2015, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,474 posts, read 13,406,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
My point exactly, is that I have planted the repeat bloomers in my south facing southern garden, and I have had carefree blooms all summer. What's the beef?
I like daylilies. You know they're edible. I feel like I'm tacky because I have stella D'oro and the plain orange one. They are really common, but pretty and useful. Stella stays pretty all season if you ask me. I hear ya on the reblooming.

Reblooming daylilies rock. Stella again is kind of common and an older variety, but I love the short status and how it reblooms in Fall. It also stays in a little clump and is not as thuggish as the straight species. So there, Azoria.
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Old 10-16-2015, 11:31 PM
 
Location: rain city
2,956 posts, read 11,042,170 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
stays in a little clump and is not as thuggish as the straight species. So there, Azoria.
"Straight" species? Are you suggesting some kind off botanical hanky-panky here?
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Old 10-17-2015, 12:48 PM
 
3,270 posts, read 1,942,828 times
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I adore daylilies. I have approximately 70-75 of them, and buy at least one or two new ones every year. I have many beautiful colors and varieties and many of them are fragrant. I get them from Oakes Daylilies, and they are a fantastic place to buy from. (And they always send bonus plants. Yay!) They do need to be divided every 4-5 years, but dividing them is a breeze. Finding a new spot for the divisions is the problem! So I keep expanding my raised-bed area. They are definitely care-free and can survive drought or low-rain conditions for a long time. A good plant for people who don't have a lot of time to spend in the garden. Plant them in good soil, fertilize them once in a while, and they are happy.

A lot of people think only of what are known around here as "ditch lilies" when they hear the word "daylily". They have their charm, but they are common and can be aggressive growers. If that's what anyone on this forum thinks daylilies are like, take a look at a website like oakesdaylilies.com and see why people like me are crazy for 'em.
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Old 10-19-2015, 12:13 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,542 posts, read 42,708,506 times
Reputation: 57189
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
I adore daylilies. I have approximately 70-75 of them, and buy at least one or two new ones every year. I have many beautiful colors and varieties and many of them are fragrant. I get them from Oakes Daylilies, and they are a fantastic place to buy from. (And they always send bonus plants. Yay!) They do need to be divided every 4-5 years, but dividing them is a breeze. Finding a new spot for the divisions is the problem! So I keep expanding my raised-bed area. They are definitely care-free and can survive drought or low-rain conditions for a long time. A good plant for people who don't have a lot of time to spend in the garden. Plant them in good soil, fertilize them once in a while, and they are happy.

A lot of people think only of what are known around here as "ditch lilies" when they hear the word "daylily". They have their charm, but they are common and can be aggressive growers. If that's what anyone on this forum thinks daylilies are like, take a look at a website like oakesdaylilies.com and see why people like me are crazy for 'em.
I will look at Oakes Daylilies, although I'm happy with Smokey's. I just ordered 4 tall, evergreen varieties, in colors other than yellow. It seems that the yellow ones are always more flashy than the other colors.
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