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Old 11-10-2015, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,390 posts, read 40,841,697 times
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I've never tried this method but I've had great success with airplane plants, asparagus ferns, begonias, mums, geraniums, coleus, etc. I leave hostas in the pots on the front porch and rarely water them but of course, they are perennials.
I have cuttings of coleus and begonias taking root in water in my window sills right now.
When I dig up asparagus ferns, airplane plants, etc from my large containers I pot them up with a bit of new potting soil getting as big a root ball as possible. Then I stack up plastic milk cartons in my bathtub and let them get as much sun as possible and water just a bit. They like the bathroom light and moisture, the cats can't get to them and I never use the tub anyway. I've done this for years now.

What do you do to overwinter annuals inside?

Easy Overwintering - The Garden Professors
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Old 11-10-2015, 09:18 AM
 
Location: CO
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While I agree (sort of) with the author's idea on overwintering; dry, dead stems are not a great look on my bookshelves! I overwinter potted ferns in my basement but I do water them occasionally. There will be a lot of leaf drop and browning fronds, but next summer I will clean them up and put them back outside. No starting from scratch waiting for them to leaf out!
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Old 11-10-2015, 10:35 AM
 
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What if you've had a hard frost already? Are the plants too far gone to try this method? I am intrigued, as I certainly have enough room in my basement.

Don't like the idea of potentially bringing hitchhiking insects in the house, though. Which is why I have not brought plants in the house in the past.
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Old 11-10-2015, 12:09 PM
 
Location: CO
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I'm assuming a hard frost would have killed your annuals, in which case the above method wouldn't work.
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Old 11-10-2015, 12:30 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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We haven't gotten any frost yet, rather unusual. This morning was 38, the coldest night so far. When it gets closer to freezing I will bring the Martha Washingtons and other geraniums into the house, cut them back and reduce the watering. I will place some of the cuttings into water to root for backup. My Meyer Lemon, Hibiscus and bougainvillea
I already brought in. They just grow as houseplants in bright windows until spring. The Meyer has popped out many blossom buds since being inside for 2 weeks, by Thanksgiving we should have an amazing aroma in the family room.
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Old 11-10-2015, 06:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
I'm assuming a hard frost would have killed your annuals, in which case the above method wouldn't work.
I do have a stubborn begonia which refuses to die and which popped out a bloom in the last couple of days. LOL But it is the exception.
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Old 11-10-2015, 06:42 PM
 
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Hmmm, interesting article. I have been putting my plants in the laundry room on a high shelf where they receive southern exposure. I bring in geraniums, crotons, aloe, sansevaria, bromeliad and bird of paradise which grew heaps this summer and will have to sit on the floor.

I don't think of these as annuals but semi-tropical perennials. I did have some snapdragons live for 2 seasons but they finally keeled over last August after one too many scorching hit days.

Aren't true annuals pretty much done after one season?
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Old 11-11-2015, 10:17 PM
 
Location: CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinadreamin View Post
Hmmm, interesting article. I have been putting my plants in the laundry room on a high shelf where they receive southern exposure. I bring in geraniums, crotons, aloe, sansevaria, bromeliad and bird of paradise which grew heaps this summer and will have to sit on the floor.

I don't think of these as annuals but semi-tropical perennials. I did have some snapdragons live for 2 seasons but they finally keeled over last August after one too many scorching hit days.

Aren't true annuals pretty much done after one season?
Yes, but many plants we call annuals are perennials in warmer climates. When left in the ground in northern climes they will not survive. Presumably if we can give them ideal conditions indoors in the winter we can mimic the warmer climate. But then, like perennials, they can't be expected to bloom year-round.

I personally wouldn't bother with inside overwintering of petunias, pansies, and other easily obtained, low-cost annuals. But people do enjoy seeing what they can keep going. I use up all my winter plant patience on all those ferns in my basement.
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Old 11-12-2015, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,390 posts, read 40,841,697 times
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Yesterday I potted up about 40 offshoots from a big airplane plant. I will keep them in the bathtub starting when we get the first frost warning. I'm going to let the mother plants stay in the pots on the front porch to see how they do. A friend said she plants airplane plants in her garden and they come back. Must be a very protected area.

I also divided two huge asparagus ferns into 8 plants and potted them up. I know from experience they will get very ill looking in the tub but they came back the minute they were put back outside in the spring.

The thing is it is hard to find really BIG asparagus ferns and airplane plants and I'm too cheap to start from scratch every year. I spend a fortune in my garden every spring with trying new perennials and "just a few" new plants to try out in my huge pots on the front porch. I have to manage my gardening budget better this year.
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Old 11-12-2015, 06:28 AM
 
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Meh, I leave them outside. Oh that's right I'm in California.
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