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Old 01-26-2016, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
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Here at the edge of a residential area I am trying to proliferate milkweed, especially at property/road edges and places where crops are not appropriate. Have had the joy of seeing caterpillars that turned to chrysalis, but not an emergence yet.
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Old 01-26-2016, 03:11 PM
Status: "Super Junior's 12th Anniversary!" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nateswift View Post
Here at the edge of a residential area I am trying to proliferate milkweed, especially at property/road edges and places where crops are not appropriate. Have had the joy of seeing caterpillars that turned to chrysalis, but not an emergence yet.
Are you a guerilla gardener? Heh heh heh so am I, though I avoid throwing seeds on or near crop fields. This year I made seed bombs for the first time. My asclepias incarnata plants seem to have died out (too much shade?), but I did buy seeds this year for a newly-sunny area near a culvert on my property.


I got the milkweed and a ton of other native seeds online. Hope they all do well. A few years ago, I planted a bunch of native seeds from a mix, and they had some other sort of milkweed in them. Maybe showy milkweed? This one seems spread by runners and popped up in a shrub border, where it was unwelcome.

When Van Burgondien was selling milkweed roots, I got some hello yellow a. tuberosa, and that has done really well. It self sowed, though and many of the new plants are orange, and not yellow. It is all good. I'm sharing the seeds and trying to populate some waste areas with them.

The people who take care of the grounds at my job planted lots of native trees, shrubs and grasses. It is awesome. I've seed bombed the area nearby, which is a waste area along the road, with native flower seeds. This includes a. tuberosa. There are mostly weeds there, with some white eupatorium, which seems to be the main native wildflower that survives there. Can't wait to see them in a year or two.
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Old 02-05-2016, 09:21 AM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
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I found this site which might interest anyone who would like to grow milkweed that is native to their area. Click the tab that reads "Locate Milkweed" A list will drop down, and click on your state for true natives to your area.

Grow Milkweed Plants - Find Milkweed, Grow Milkweed Plants.
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Old 02-05-2016, 04:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gunslinger256 View Post
remember that they are attracted to the milkweeds because that's pretty much the only thing the caterpillars eat. most of the milk weeds will come back even after being stripped bare so don't worry about it.

asclepias currasivica is tropical milk weed and may not come back if you are cooler than zone 8 (ie 1-7).

ordinary milk weed is hard to find because many of the plants are invasive especially asclepias tuberosa also known as swamp weed. it will agressively send out runners as well as have lots of seeds to disperse. luckily the milkweeds are easily controlled by round up (glyphosate) which is also the reason why the Monarch food source is putting the butterflies at risk.

milkweeds have deep tap roots, so they may not do well in a container unless it's relatively tall (ie 1-2 ft tall)

I started with just a small hand full of seeds and only 2 seedlings made it to the garden but they produce plenty of seeds which you will need to watch like a hawk because once they open they'll get carried away like wishes.

be careful about what you're looking for a. curassavica looks alot like a. tuberosa

I'm growing:

asclepias curassavica (tropical milkweed)


asclepias speciosa (showy milkweed)
I had to work to keep the swamp milkweed alive. It was never invasive in my yard. I also had to hose off the aphids almost daily.
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Old 02-06-2016, 06:55 AM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
I had to work to keep the swamp milkweed alive. It was never invasive in my yard. I also had to hose off the aphids almost daily.
Swamp milkweed (swampweed) likes wet feet, and full sun. So if you are planting it in a garden setting, make sure the other plants can handle the extra watering, or at the very least use a good top dressing of mulch to keep the soil from drying out too quickly.
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Old 02-06-2016, 07:09 AM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
1,546 posts, read 647,989 times
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Originally Posted by ponychick View Post
You have a beautiful garden, LIcenter, and thanks for the links, nokudzu. I looked online last year for a place to get seeds but no luck. I'll definitely plant some this year.

I also like to plant a healthy amount of parsley in my garden, to share with the caterpillars. They love it!


Swallowtails love parsley, dill, and fennel along with a list too long to mention. This year I will be planting Dutchmans pipe which is a great perennial host plant for them also.

Quote:
"The Pipevine caterpillar feeds almost exclusively
on pipevine leaves. This makes both larva and
adult butterfly poisonous. The darker Tiger Swallow-
tail mimics the Pipevine by confusing predators
into thinking they, the Tiger, would be poisonous to."
Below is a link to the many host plants for all the different species of Swallowtails.

Swallowtail Caterpillar Host Plants
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Old 02-29-2016, 04:08 PM
 
Location: West Coast
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This Facebook page has a lot of gorgeous photos of Monarchs.

https://www.facebook.com/MonarchButt...ificNorthwest/


LIcenter - I LOVE your garden. Awesome pictures
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Old 03-01-2016, 04:58 AM
 
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Milkweed aphids? I vacuum them up in the morning with a shop vac. Works like a charm.
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Old 03-01-2016, 10:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LIcenter View Post
Monarchs dancing around my tropical milkweed Asclepias curassavica


Here's a monarch cat munching on the same plant.


Here is another one on my swampweed. Asclepias Incarnata


I also have many regular milkweed. Asclepias Tuberosa I am still on the hunt for Common milkweed plants. (very difficult to find) Seeds I can find anywhere, but I always like to start with at least one real plant.

After a few days of munching on the milkweeds. This is what they turn into.
Monarch Chrysalis:


Which turns into this beautiful creature.
What type of conditions do your milkweed like best? Last year, I weeded and covered my landscaping beds with landscape cloth because of flooding conditions in my yard. 2-3 times per year (and seemingly non-stop since November till now) my yard has anywhere from 6 inches to 3 feet of standing water. Most cultivated plants don't survive this and the weeds just took over. I wonder if milkweed will tolerate those conditions better than other plants. I'd love to attract some butterflies to the yard.
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Old 03-02-2016, 04:37 AM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
1,546 posts, read 647,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWayISeeThings View Post
What type of conditions do your milkweed like best? Last year, I weeded and covered my landscaping beds with landscape cloth because of flooding conditions in my yard. 2-3 times per year (and seemingly non-stop since November till now) my yard has anywhere from 6 inches to 3 feet of standing water. Most cultivated plants don't survive this and the weeds just took over. I wonder if milkweed will tolerate those conditions better than other plants. I'd love to attract some butterflies to the yard.

Asclepias Incarnata Is the only milkweed that I grow that will withstand those conditions. They love wet feet where as the others I have prefer dryer field like conditions.
Here is a link for milkweed plants. Click on the tab 'Locate milkweed, to see what is native to your area. There should be a few more that will grow under your conditions.

Grow Milkweed Plants - Find Milkweed, Grow Milkweed Plants.
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