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Old 03-10-2016, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,186 posts, read 1,627,626 times
Reputation: 306

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Had my sol tested last fall and PH was right in line with ideal range.

Where do you buy your Ironite? Costco has an amazing price in it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
I just added Lime. I heard Lime and Ironite do not mix well because the Calcium interacts badly with the Lime or something like that.


Lime Only has worked for me over the years, but the Ironite caught my attention this year. I will wait 90 days before applying the Ironite unless I see my grass is green enough.


I believe the bottom line is


Ironite = Greener Grass blades even without growth
Lime = Neutralizing the soil so the grass gets more nutrition and grows healthier
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Old 03-11-2016, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,490 posts, read 962,927 times
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OP, you offer some interesting points. Here's my 2 cents:
-Not all climates are suited for tall fescue (mine for instance, low desert. Bermuda is the only turf that can take our ultra high temps. Tall fescue would struggle here, but it's commonly planted in slightly cooler Las Vegas.)
-I doubt if you need Ironite considering your location in North Carolina. Ironite is mainly used for areas where micronutrients are in short supply (like alkaline soils, low rainfall areas, usually in the West.) Your soil's pH is probably below 7, so micronutrient deficiencies are not likely a problem with your lawn.) If your soil pH drops too low, you may want to add gypsum and epsom salts to add extra calcium and magnesium.

I envy your gardening climate. Good luck!!
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Old 03-11-2016, 08:09 PM
 
1,786 posts, read 5,646,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spankys bbq View Post
I've got the builder special: bermuda sod in front and fescue seed in back.

My lot was a mess of trees, weeds and vines when I picked it. Not the best starting point. I moved in towards the middle of October 2013.

The first year was not much more than lots of water and an organic liquid fertilizer I have. The fert is a 10-3-4, actually a hort product, but it works equally well on grass. I also put out some lime. It was a full bag but I can't remember how much. I wasn't bashful about it, that's for sure.

The first winter, I spent a few nice afternoons with a screwdriver and beat-up butterknife popping out all manner of weeds. I focused on the bigger stuff first and then worked my way down in somewhat of a grid pattern. I was also making sure I got as many nails and screws up as I could. There were tons of them.

Spring, 2014 opened with Scott's fert with the pre-emergent and a hefty shot of the liquid fertilizer. I followed that up a month later with another round of the liquid. By June the lines between sod rolls were disappearing quickly.

July was hot and dry. My water bill reflected that. I had to make sure the grass was really established and had a chance. I didn't, and still don't, trust this builder's work. Summer and Fall applications of the Scott's stuff. A few more passes with the liquid. By the end of the summer I had a pretty good looking lawn. I was pleased based on where I started. Neighbors were doing thier best to walk a path in my yard as they walked their dogs. 2 of them would take their shoes off.

Over the winter the yard got a few more spot treatments with Round Up and the screwdriver. One very early pass with the liquid again around February because i needed to get outside. Wife and kids....

Spring 2015 had my yard green faster than anyone else. As soon as it greened up all I did was spread the Scott's and a pass of liquid. Scott's in the Summer and 2 more passes of liquid and I had grass so this it would choke out your average homeowner grade push mower. It's kind of funny how defined the line is between my yard and the neighbor's. Even right now, it is almost a perfectly straight line, very distinct.

This year will be more of the same. Scott's and liquid. I'm going to try to make the bermuda grow in the back yard now that I've removed a few trees. This ought to be fun.

I guess my point is, you can have a nice yard using just the Scott's and water. I use the liquid because I have it, and I really like mowing. I'm eyeballing a nice 30" eXmark for this year since my 48 and 52 are a bit too wide to get the stripe patterns I want. I want to play checkers on my stripes.
Oh my gosh! Hats off to you! Would you please make a short trip down 85 South to my house in suburban Atlanta and help us?? Lol . Our grass could sure use it.

We have someone cut it and I really think that's where all of the weeds are coming from. The henbit, the purpley like flowers, the crab grass...we have alot of grass.

When it's cut down low it looks presentable. But the weeds grow oh so quickly and I have to slink around the neighborhood as "all the other kids" have nice grass. It's really not thaaat bad, but it could certainly be better.
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Old 03-11-2016, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,186 posts, read 1,627,626 times
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Good points as grass type is going to vary in different parts of the country. As for Ironite, using it solely as a summer application simply for the greening effect and avoiding nitrogen in the summer season.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
OP, you offer some interesting points. Here's my 2 cents:
-Not all climates are suited for tall fescue (mine for instance, low desert. Bermuda is the only turf that can take our ultra high temps. Tall fescue would struggle here, but it's commonly planted in slightly cooler Las Vegas.)
-I doubt if you need Ironite considering your location in North Carolina. Ironite is mainly used for areas where micronutrients are in short supply (like alkaline soils, low rainfall areas, usually in the West.) Your soil's pH is probably below 7, so micronutrient deficiencies are not likely a problem with your lawn.) If your soil pH drops too low, you may want to add gypsum and epsom salts to add extra calcium and magnesium.

I envy your gardening climate. Good luck!!
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Old 03-12-2016, 10:53 AM
 
Location: SWCT - close to coast
55,460 posts, read 38,021,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by movin2Reston View Post
Had my sol tested last fall and PH was right in line with ideal range.

Where do you buy your Ironite? Costco has an amazing price in it.
Got mine at Lowes . 40 pound bag for $7.50 + tax. Check out the FAQ's before putting it down. It's nice it doesn't contain a lot of Potassium, and no Phosphorus so I might use it in my Veggie Garden. We'll see.
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Old 03-12-2016, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,186 posts, read 1,627,626 times
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Very good price. Been using it on all my plants and shrubs for several years now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Got mine at Lowes . 40 pound bag for $7.50 + tax. Check out the FAQ's before putting it down. It's nice it doesn't contain a lot of Potassium, and no Phosphorus so I might use it in my Veggie Garden. We'll see.
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Old 03-12-2016, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Lake Norman, NC
6,747 posts, read 9,991,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spankys bbq View Post
I've got the builder special: bermuda sod in front and fescue seed in back.
We have the same thing, the builders cocktail of Bermuda sod and fescue seed. Ours was placed in January 2015 and immediately turned to crap from the winter storms we had last year. Then the dry, hot summer took its toll on the yard after that. When all was said and done, we had about 35% lawn coverage (aside from the sod). Our house almost turned orange from the clay dust my mower kicked up. There were huge dust clouds whenever I cut the "grass" last season.

We aerated and overseeded last Fall, so at least we're improving the percentage of green in our lawn.

Going to put down the Lesco Pre-M tomorrow before the incoming showers. Forgot to get my lime down already, but I don't want to delay the Pre-M.

Will forego over-seeding again till the Fall. We are no where near having an acceptable lawn, but I can live with it this year if we get steady rain showers and no drought. The yard is too big to drag the hoses all around!
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Old 03-13-2016, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,186 posts, read 1,627,626 times
Reputation: 306
Cut low = More weeds
Cut high = Less weeds


Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhousegirl View Post
Oh my gosh! Hats off to you! Would you please make a short trip down 85 South to my house in suburban Atlanta and help us?? Lol . Our grass could sure use it.

We have someone cut it and I really think that's where all of the weeds are coming from. The henbit, the purpley like flowers, the crab grass...we have alot of grass.

When it's cut down low it looks presentable. But the weeds grow oh so quickly and I have to slink around the neighborhood as "all the other kids" have nice grass. It's really not thaaat bad, but it could certainly be better.
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Old 03-16-2016, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,490 posts, read 962,927 times
Reputation: 1516
Someone suggested adding lime to their soil. I'd definitely NOT recommend adding lime to your soil unless a soil test indicates you need it. Soil tests are cheap!

In general, if you live west of Ohio (excluding the south), you probably don't need lime. You want your soil pH to be around 6 or 6.5, otherwise you'll get micronutrient deficiencies (like we have here in the dry west.)
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Old 03-17-2016, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,186 posts, read 1,627,626 times
Reputation: 306
Soil test should be done regularly.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
Someone suggested adding lime to their soil. I'd definitely NOT recommend adding lime to your soil unless a soil test indicates you need it. Soil tests are cheap!

In general, if you live west of Ohio (excluding the south), you probably don't need lime. You want your soil pH to be around 6 or 6.5, otherwise you'll get micronutrient deficiencies (like we have here in the dry west.)
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