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Old 02-05-2019, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,625 posts, read 2,252,278 times
Reputation: 485

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70’ today...Hard to believe. Spring is got to be right around the corner.

My lawn is craving Milorganite.
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Old 02-09-2019, 06:28 AM
 
1,223 posts, read 427,502 times
Reputation: 1004
Quote:
Originally Posted by movin2Reston View Post
70’ today...Hard to believe. Spring is got to be right around the corner.

My lawn is craving Milorganite.
I stocked up on a bunch last week since Home Depot just received a pallet full and it’s usually out of stock by early summer.

The first application should be around Memorial Day, correct?
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Old 02-09-2019, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,625 posts, read 2,252,278 times
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Great to hear.

Memorial Day generally works well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickcin View Post
I stocked up on a bunch last week since Home Depot just received a pallet full and it’s usually out of stock by early summer.

The first application should be around Memorial Day, correct?
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Old 02-10-2019, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,451 posts, read 1,682,694 times
Reputation: 2427
Quote:
Originally Posted by movin2Reston View Post
70’ today...Hard to believe. Spring is got to be right around the corner.

My lawn is craving Milorganite.
I know what you mean re: spring is right around the corner. Spring comes super early here (Phoenix), like mid Feb. If I wanted to, I could probably coax my tif lawn out of dormancy by fertilizing it and watering it more than I have been (which is minimally).

I've tried Milorganite on my lawn two seasons. It never gave me a huge WOW result, so I'll say I'm neutral on the product. BTW, I applied it heavily, too. Bermuda grass is notorious for being a heavy feeder.
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:38 PM
 
272 posts, read 77,988 times
Reputation: 751
Quote:
Originally Posted by movin2Reston View Post
Anyone ever used this product?
I would not touch it with the 6 ft pole.
It is an “upcycled” city sewage.
They legally can do it as it is processed by high heat to kill bacteria and such - so they say it is “safe”

However, what happened to toxic arsenic, lead, cadmium, etc, etc, unaffected byproducts of chemotherapy drugs, radioactive therapy used to treat people for cancer?
People throw all kinds of things into their toilets: anybody washed their painting brushes at least once?

Unless you have a huge acreage and absolutely desperate for it- still- you better off getting leaves, grass clippings from non- chemical lawn neighbors for free and composting and topping up your soil with the results- much less undesirables on your property. Once it is there- it is forever practically!
Every hard rain drop or a gust of wind over small bare patches will raise the bad staff into the air which your family, your pets breathe. Yes, it is small amounts, but it adds up...

There are no tests developed ( intentionally, I think - the lesson from a tobacco industry) so you do not know what could be there.
If you suspect something- it may cost you min $300-400 per element tested in a very specialized lab, which you may not even find.

So the question is: why spend money on something like that. I applaud they try to do something- let them use this stuff in destroyed by mining soils to help some regeneration of the already poisoned soils, but why entice the homeowners to spread it where we live and our children play?
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Old 02-12-2019, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Western KY
50 posts, read 19,881 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik4me View Post
I would not touch it with the 6 ft pole.
It is an “upcycled” city sewage.
They legally can do it as it is processed by high heat to kill bacteria and such - so they say it is “safe”

However, what happened to toxic arsenic, lead, cadmium, etc, etc, unaffected byproducts of chemotherapy drugs, radioactive therapy used to treat people for cancer?
People throw all kinds of things into their toilets: anybody washed their painting brushes at least once?

Unless you have a huge acreage and absolutely desperate for it- still- you better off getting leaves, grass clippings from non- chemical lawn neighbors for free and composting and topping up your soil with the results- much less undesirables on your property. Once it is there- it is forever practically!
Every hard rain drop or a gust of wind over small bare patches will raise the bad staff into the air which your family, your pets breathe. Yes, it is small amounts, but it adds up...

There are no tests developed ( intentionally, I think - the lesson from a tobacco industry) so you do not know what could be there.
If you suspect something- it may cost you min $300-400 per element tested in a very specialized lab, which you may not even find.

So the question is: why spend money on something like that. I applaud they try to do something- let them use this stuff in destroyed by mining soils to help some regeneration of the already poisoned soils, but why entice the homeowners to spread it where we live and our children play?



Exactly!

Not to mention all the medicines that people throw in the toilet, as well as all the illegal drugs like cocaine, heroin, meth, etc...

There's NO WAY I would EVER take the chance and put that crap in my yard or garden. But then again, we have wild herbs that grow in our yard, and I refuse to spray, cause they are so helpful.

If you want good fertilizer, use grass fed cow or horse manure mixed with leaves and vegetable matter, and compost it yourself; then make a tea out of it. Best thing ever!!! <3
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Old 02-12-2019, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,625 posts, read 2,252,278 times
Reputation: 485
Milorganite is an amazing product which explains why every summer demand exceeds supply.
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Old 03-08-2019, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,625 posts, read 2,252,278 times
Reputation: 485
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=u7d-UGE90mM

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Old 03-14-2019, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
36,349 posts, read 44,483,418 times
Reputation: 60405
So, I went to an HD talk about Milorganite. I am more open to using it than I was, but that still isn’t really open to using it.
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Old 03-15-2019, 07:43 AM
 
1,223 posts, read 427,502 times
Reputation: 1004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boo Boo Kitty View Post



Exactly!

Not to mention all the medicines that people throw in the toilet, as well as all the illegal drugs like cocaine, heroin, meth, etc...

There's NO WAY I would EVER take the chance and put that crap in my yard or garden. But then again, we have wild herbs that grow in our yard, and I refuse to spray, cause they are so helpful.

If you want good fertilizer, use grass fed cow or horse manure mixed with leaves and vegetable matter, and compost it yourself; then make a tea out of it. Best thing ever!!! <3
It’s inconceivable that some are now concerned using an organic fertilizer because of what other humans have consumed or have tossed down the toilet?
All sewer water is treated in a waste water plant and does not have the consistency once all of the waste water has been treated. As far as drugs or foreign harmful substances in the raw sewage, it must be a minuscule amount since it’s a small (or tiny) percentage of the population, it gets diluted with water when flushed (/household bath and sink water) and get treated at a waste water plant.

I think this is Far Safer than the lawn chemical fertilizers that are sold in mass quantities from big box stores and those applied by commercial lawn services.

I guess many of us have the ability to overthink things and to try to predict what is most dangerous in our environment today without ever knowing for certain what the largest dangers really are.
Perhaps it’s the radiation fro WiFi that’s causing cancer but again, we can only guess and have our own individual opinions as to what’s dangerous and what’s safe.
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