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Old 04-25-2016, 06:17 PM
 
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I have 2 oak trees (one tall. the other not so much) that had English Ivy planted around them to grow up the trees by the previous owner.The ivy has grown into the canopy of the tall tree and has supporting trunks that are so huge they seem like part of the tree and I don't think I can fully remove them to kill the ivy all the way up the tree. Will I eventually need to cut down these two oaks (they aren't dying and seem to be healthy trees otherwise) so that the other trees in the woods in the back of my house aren't taken over too? There are 2 other oaks nearby whose canopys almost touch the tall oak covered in ivy.Will the ivy go from one canopy to another and smother the the other two oaks from the top down? I would like to save these trees somehow but I am not sure what I can do. As I said the ivy trunks are so thick and interwoven it's about impossible to saw though and remove them.
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Old 04-25-2016, 06:22 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Cut the ivy vines close to the ground a couple feet up. Get every single one. If the vines are big you may have to use a pruning saw. Don't damage the tree bark if you can help it. Don't yank on the vines or pull them away from the trunk yet.


Cutting them will kill the vines, they'll dry up and then you can gently pull them down, or trim the vines up so you don't see the ends.


No need to sacrifice a tree to get id of a weed.
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Old 04-25-2016, 06:25 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post


No need to sacrifice a tree to get id of a weed.
Exactly!
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Old 04-25-2016, 06:27 PM
 
705 posts, read 763,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Cut the ivy vines close to the ground a couple feet up. Get every single one. If the vines are big you may have to use a pruning saw. Don't damage the tree bark if you can help it. Don't yank on the vines or pull them away from the trunk yet.


Cutting them will kill the vines, they'll dry up and then you can gently pull them down, or trim the vines up so you don't see the ends.


No need to sacrifice a tree to get id of a weed.


The only thing is is that the vine has been growing for maybe 35 to 40 years and the ivy trunks are thick and woody and overlaid in a thick network. I tried sawing into the trunks with a hacksaw and then prying it off with a big screwdriver but I can't get down to the tree itself the ivy trunk is so thick. And these trees are covered almost from top to bottom.I have been cutting the trunks at about shoulder height. I had some success getting the trunks removed down to the tree on one side but then on opposite side the trunks are very thick and growing side by side.

Last edited by senecaman; 04-25-2016 at 06:40 PM..
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Old 04-25-2016, 06:40 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,813 posts, read 41,763,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by senecaman View Post
The only thing is is that the vine has been growing for maybe 35 to 40 years and the ivy trunks are thick and woody and overlaid in a thick network. I tried sawing into the trunks with a hacksaw and then prying it off with a big screwdriver but I can't get down to the tree itself the ivy trunk is so thick. And these trees are covered almost from top to bottom.I have been cutting the trunks at about shoulder height.

Pruning saw. It will take some time.


Try one of these:





Leonard Tri-Edge Folding Pruning Saw, 7-inch Curved Blade | Gardeners Edge
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Old 04-25-2016, 06:45 PM
 
705 posts, read 763,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Pruning saw. It will take some time.


Try one of these:





Leonard Tri-Edge Folding Pruning Saw, 7-inch Curved Blade | Gardeners Edge

LOL I will keep trying and I have a pruning saw(a hack saw too) but I might end up cutting into the tree. Are the other trees that I mentioned nearby in danger of the ivy getting into the tops of them too?The canopys of the trees are close together.I just picture this stuff taking over all the trees in the woods in my backyard.
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Old 04-25-2016, 06:48 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,813 posts, read 41,763,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by senecaman View Post
LOL I will keep trying and I have a pruning saw(a hack saw too) but I might end up cutting into the tree. Are the other trees that I mentioned nearby in danger of the ivy getting into the tops of them too?I just picture this stuff taking over all the trees in the woods in my backyard.


Use the pruning saw, the teeth are designed to do what you want. A hacksaw is designed to cut metal.

If you hit the trunk a bit it won't hurt it, just don't do it often.


You just have to devote some time to it.

Yes, the ivy can vine over to the canopies of the other trees if they're close.
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Old 04-25-2016, 06:56 PM
 
705 posts, read 763,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Use the pruning saw, the teeth are designed to do what you want. A hacksaw is designed to cut metal.


If you hit the trunk a bit it won't hurt it, just don't do it often.


Yes, the ivy can vine over to the canopies of the other trees if they're close.

Do I need to worry about it getting onto the tops of other trees? Smothering them from the top down? Or would it grow only near the top of the other tree? Thats why I was thinking maybe it was best to sacrifice one tree and cut it down before it spreads to other trees. I am just very discouraged because the vine trunks are so thick and my progress seems slow.I feel like as I try to saw through the trunks I will have sawed into the tree and damage it anyway.But I will try again with the pruning saw.I am just worried that all my trees will end up covered in ivy these 2 oaks and I have really nice hardwood trees in my backyard woods.
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Old 04-25-2016, 07:01 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,813 posts, read 41,763,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by senecaman View Post
Do I need to worry about it getting onto the tops of other trees? Smothering them from the top down? Or would it grow only near the top of the other tree? Thats why I was thinking maybe it was best to sacrifice one tree and cut it down before it spreads to other trees. I am just very discouraged because the vine trunks are so think and my progress seems slow.I feel like before I saw all the way through the trunks I will have sawed into the tree and damage it anyway.But I will try again with the pruning saw

If they're close enough it can vine over.


Look, I've done what you're doing with Virginia Creeper. My almost gone English Ivy stayed terrestrial.


You're right, it takes a fair amount of time. Just be patient and keep at it.
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Old 04-25-2016, 07:07 PM
 
705 posts, read 763,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
If they're close enough it can vine over.


Look, I've done what you're doing with Virginia Creeper. My almost gone English Ivy stayed terrestrial.


You're right, it takes a fair amount of time. Just be patient and keep at it.


I will keep trying as you say but do I need to freak out if it does vine over?Then it seems like I am in danger of another tree getting swallowed up over time except this time from the top down. So if I keep hacking at the vine trunks though it will eventually kill the vine all the way to the top of the covered oak so I don't have to worry about vining over?
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