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Old 05-09-2016, 06:07 PM
 
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I live in zone 9 and I have planted some Scottish and Irish Moss in a partially shaded area of my lawn. It has been a week since I first planted the moss and it has been unusually dry with temps in the mid 80's. I've attempted to make sure the soil looks at least moist and not bone dry. Despite my attempts, I am already seeing much yellowing on some of the plants. Anybody have any suggestions or thoughts on why this may be happening?

Another question: do these types of moss plants generally spread aggressively, or are they slow/don't spread at all.

Thanks for any comments.




Last edited by xerojer; 05-09-2016 at 06:19 PM..
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Old 05-09-2016, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
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Heat an moisture play a big role. read this information, it may help you.
Why Is My Moss Turning Brown? | eHow
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Old 05-10-2016, 10:08 PM
 
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"temps in the mid 80's" -- just rub it in, why dontcha. LOL! Chilly, grey and dreary here. Our moss goes through stages. It looks fabulous after it rains, and then it dries up when we get a dry spell. Just as soon as we get some rain, it perks up again. There are many different kinds of mosses, and my husband loves them all. Most of them do spread, at least the ones in our yard.
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Old 05-11-2016, 03:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
There are many different kinds of mosses, and my husband loves them all. Most of them do spread, at least the ones in our yard.
^ I have the same problem with moss spreading. Except it's on my roof... and my sidewalk... and my dog...


I guess that's one of the hazards of living in this beautiful green area!
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Old 05-12-2016, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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I think it is just an adjustment thing. If your moss is going to thrive where you have planted it, it will. If it is not happy there, then nothing you can do will help.
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Old 05-14-2016, 09:35 AM
 
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Don't worry, I live in Houston and I assure you the weather is misery lol. Mid 80's may sound nice, but I work outside and there is already a heat index of up to +7 degrees, high humidity and dew points around 70. Hard to believe it is going to get much, much worse.
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Old 05-14-2016, 09:40 AM
 
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Thanks for the tips and advice guys. I don't know why it is hard for me to accept that this stuff doesn't want to grow right. See, I'm looking for a pretty particular type of plant- a ground cover that doesn't grow too tall attracting snakes (we have already killed our first water moccasin), one that spreads aggressively, preferably one with small blooms or at least pretty (like these bright mosses), and one that can withstand the hell on earth that is gulf coast zone 9.

It is frustrating that, as an amateur gardener I can have many various plants that thrive to one extent or another, but I cannot successfully grow glorified grass. Our climate isn't all bad, with year-round evergreens and many plants that are more tropical than seen elsewhere. It wasn't until I lived in Dallas for a couple years that I realized just how green Houston is-sort of how I would expect the pacific northwest to look.

Anywho, I am planning on trying out some English Ivy around a circle of roses I have. I am just concerned about using English Ivy everywhere, because it seems like nice habitat for snakes.
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