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Old 05-23-2016, 11:40 AM
 
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i have heard that the 50lb bags of granular molasses keeps them away. personally, i would think it would attract them, but they talk about it in detail in the organic lawn care section. i put some on my yard in columbia last year to feed the microherd and i had no fireants.....SPIDERS out the wazoo, but no fireants

if you don't own your home I would recommend moving. but this remedy is a good start.
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Old 05-23-2016, 12:04 PM
 
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Default How to kill fire ants

1) Start a slow trickle of water from a hose beside the mound and let go for 10 minutes at least, just enough water to fill a glass every 30 seconds and no more. goal is to saturate the ground around the pile and encourage the queen and eggs to be moved to the top above the presumed flooding from rain.

2) After about 10 minutes of the water trickling, check the top of the mound without distrurbing ants and discover where they are going. If they are on top of the mound scurrying around go to step 3

ANTS MOVING AWAY FROM WATER? Find where they are going and wait for them all to move the eggs, in another 10 minutes then go to step 3

3) KILL OPTIONS
A) Boil at least 1 liter or more of water and pour on areas where fire ants have collected themselves after the water hose flood. I usually will pour a gallon or more
B) Apply liquid or dry pesticide... not nearly as effective as boiling water but safer for plants.
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Old 05-23-2016, 01:48 PM
 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGJ2jMZ-gaI
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Old 05-28-2016, 01:55 AM
 
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There are lots of things that can deter fire ants, but not kill the ants in the mound. When I lived in Texas I used Amdro on my lawn when mounds popped up. But in my garden, where I was raising organic fruits and vegetables, I used a mixture of agricultural vinegar, molasses, orange oil and water. It actually worked great to keep them out of the garden, and was not bad for the plants. (molasses is actually used as fertilizer sometimes.)
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Old 06-01-2016, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Midwest, USA
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I use grits to get rid of ant colonies in my yard. Idk if they're fire ants or not, but they do get aggressive and bite me when I'm working next to them. Don't expect it to work on contact like a pesticide b/c it's just not like that. Like another poster mentioned, the corn swells in their stomach and they basically explode. I don't have much luck with cornmeal; only the 5-minute grits (coarser grits may not work b/c they might be too big). I think the cornmeal is too small. The quick cooking grits are just the right size, even if they look the same size as the ants. I've watched the process, and it's fascinating. They don't go for the grits right after you disperse them on and around the mound. But if you wait a half hour and go back to inspect, you will (hopefully) see the ants carrying off the grits to their home. In about 2 or 3 days, come back to the mound and see if you spot any activity. I have *never* had an ant colony survive the grit treatment. Again, I'm not sure if I have fire ants or just regular ants that like to bite when disturbed. I don't know that the grits will work on fire ants in particular, but it's certainly worth trying since it's a non-toxic application. It does need to be dry outside when you apply the grits since the point is that the moisture inside the ant's stomachs is what causes the grain to swell.

Aside from that, I second the borax motion, and would add in some orange oil treatments. I always start with grits since it's such an easy and cheap option when it works. Borax and orange oil can kill quickly when used in sufficient strengths, which isn't as useful as a substance that gets carried back to the queen--like grits.
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Old 06-02-2016, 11:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freedomdove View Post
I use grits to get rid of ant colonies in my yard. the corn swells in their stomach and they basically explode.
Myth.

http://www.lsu.edu/ants/faqs.shtml
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Old 06-02-2016, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Midwest, USA
706 posts, read 398,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luvvarkansas View Post
Um, no. Something isn't a myth if it's been verified, as it has been by me. I didn't say "I think this works"; I posted my personal experience. As I mentioned, it might not help with fire ants since they may prefer different foods than regular ants. I don't actually know how it works but it does work, regardless if those people think it does or not. It may work in a different way that I can't see with my eyes, but it doesn't really matter since it *does* work (on normal small ants, at least). I was highly skeptical of the effectiveness of this "home remedy" before I started using it. Now I know better.

It reminds me of my car. I don't know *exactly* how all parts of it work, but that really doesn't matter since I just need to know how to drive it.
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Old 06-03-2016, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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gas and fire is the best way, of course...gas and fire is also best for getting rid of weeds, snow removal, piles of brush, junk around the yard, mosquitos, deer, rabbits, etc....
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Old 06-05-2016, 12:07 AM
 
4,749 posts, read 6,160,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freedomdove View Post
Um, no. Something isn't a myth if it's been verified, as it has been by me. I didn't say "I think this works"; I posted my personal experience. As I mentioned, it might not help with fire ants since they may prefer different foods than regular ants. I don't actually know how it works but it does work, regardless if those people think it does or not. It may work in a different way that I can't see with my eyes, but it doesn't really matter since it *does* work (on normal small ants, at least). I was highly skeptical of the effectiveness of this "home remedy" before I started using it. Now I know better.
.
There is some other reason it "worked" for you...it was not because the ants were "blowing up".

You probably disturbed the mound when you put the grits out...that will cause them to move.

LSU has done extensive scientific research on fire ants and believe me, they know what works and what doesn't. So go buy yourself some Amdro!
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Old 06-05-2016, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Midwest, USA
706 posts, read 398,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luvvarkansas View Post
There is some other reason it "worked" for you...it was not because the ants were "blowing up".

You probably disturbed the mound when you put the grits out...that will cause them to move.
Nope. Firstly, I don't disturb their mounds by lightly sprinkling grits around them. They don't know what to do right away, but they most certainly aren't scared off by my actions. It's not like I dump a whole box of grits on top of their mound. Also, I watch them carrying off the grits to their home. They do *not* simply move out.

Quote:
LSU has done extensive scientific research on fire ants and believe me, they know what works and what doesn't. So go buy yourself some Amdro!
Again, I don't know if grits work for fire ants. I don't think the ants here are of that type. I don't need "amdro" since the grits work fine for me. But thanks for the advice.
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