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Old 06-12-2016, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,969 posts, read 47,284,481 times
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Could this be the beginning of the end? Sycamore Trees could be going extinct here? Should they be called "sickamore"?

I been in touch with the Connecticut Plant Pathologist and here's what he said...

" There are many factors can cause thin canopy in late spring/ early summer, such as trees might be weakened by drought stress in last season, some leaf buds might be damaged during the winter, cold spring temperature might delay leaf opening, and anthracnose (a fungal disease) can cause defoliation. Did you see lot of defoliation? If no leaf drops, environmental factors are possible main causing agents for thin canopies of sycamore trees. If you see fallen leaves, please send them to us for disease diagnoses "

I found there was leaf droppings. So I sent in a few for examination. Will get the results this week and post back.




6 pictures to show it's not just 1 or 2 trees, its area wide, they all look sick. Pics taken June 10, 2016

















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Old 06-12-2016, 05:20 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,969 posts, read 47,284,481 times
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How do the Sycamore trees look in your area this year?
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Old 06-13-2016, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
How do the Sycamore trees look in your area this year?
Last I checked they looked much like those in your area, sparse, they never really got going this year.

Last year I remember a large Oak(?) tree around here looked the same way, but eventually it leafed out all the way in July and has been normal ever since.
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Old 06-13-2016, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Central Connecticut
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We traveled along 95 this weekend from Rte. 9 to Providence and back, and we noted widespread expanses of leafless or nearly leafless trees along the shoreline. The leaf canopy improved as we headed north on 9.
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Old 06-15-2016, 08:25 AM
 
Location: The sleepy part of New York City
1,867 posts, read 1,039,463 times
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We thought our sycamore was a goner too. A couple of years ago all it's leaves withered and died during the summer but all the other trees were doing fine.

But the year after that it came back and today it looks great.
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Old 06-15-2016, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Here, in Dixie, the sycamores I've seen are lush and fragrant.
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Old 06-17-2016, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,969 posts, read 47,284,481 times
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Thanks for the replies everyone. Interesting.

Here is the reply back I got after I sent in the leaves for examination... Apparently they found a disease but made a conclusion it was the weather or drought last season that stressed them.


"Dear Mr. ___:

The sycamore samples that you sent to the Experiment Station have been examined for the presence of diseases. Upon examination, anthracnose was found on few leaves of the sample collected from ______ Ave., but no pathogens were found on the sample from _______ Street. Did you see a lot of early defoliation under those trees? Did you see full canopies of those trees in early spring? I saw many sycamore trees along roadsides had thin canopies, but I did not see much leaf falling. So, the results of examination and observations suggested that thin canopies on some sycamore trees were possibly because those trees did not leaf out this spring due to weather (drought last season and unusual winter temperatures) and tree conditions"

Sincerely,
Yonghao

Yonghao Li, PhD
Plant Pathologist
Dept. of Plant Pathology and Ecology
The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
123 Huntington St.
P. O. Box 1106
New Haven, CT 06504-1106
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Old 06-18-2016, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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I took this today, many of the Oaks have been exhibiting similar behavior, which makes me think it is drought related.
Attached Thumbnails
Sycamore Trees Looking Sick-image.jpeg  
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Old 06-18-2016, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
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My silver maple looks awful with no visible signs of bugs or stress. An arborist who I ran into at the store suggested that the noreasters we experienced here both in the winter and early spring caused the trees to experience salt air burn, which has essentially dehydrated the leaves. He said as the above poster did that depending upon the year this year we would have no problem next spring. My drive to the beach is 2 miles but as the crow files it is shorter and the fog and low lying clouds kept the salt air hovering over the trees.
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Old 06-19-2016, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,969 posts, read 47,284,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post

I took this today, many of the Oaks have been exhibiting similar behavior, which makes me think it is drought related.
What the heck? I like that look in June. lol All joking aside that to me isn't a sign of drought, that's gotta be a diseased type death? They look dead. Actually, looks like there are blossoms in the back there. That's yesterday?


It's not like we haven't gotten rain. The over rated drought status for our area just means below normal precip, not California bone dry for long periods. In fact the area was never in extreme drought status and only short time in moderate.


I think the drought would cause stress, but not fully kill them unless it was too dry for years. The rings on the trees would be very tight.


Here's Long Island's precip graph past 1 yr. Over 40 inches of precip. Below the 50" normal but it has rained a lot. We were out of drought status over winter, now back in.





Questions:


Were there buds on them?
Any leaf drops you can send in for examination?
Were they full last year?
I rarely see Oaks like that especially on more than 1
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