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Old 06-19-2016, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Big Bayou
721 posts, read 222,973 times
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My mango dropped more than half of its fruit this year. I have no idea why. At least there is still a reasonable amount of fruit left on the tree.
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Old 06-19-2016, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
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Sounds to me like a lack of proper nutrition.

Try feeding some calcium-magnesium-boron when the tree breaks dormancy, then some N-P-K when buds form, and again when fruit forms.

Failure to fruit, and to support the fruit through to full-size, is more of a nutrition problem than a spraying problem -- unless you are already fertilizing.
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Old 06-19-2016, 06:30 PM
 
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Quote:
A tree arbor guy said my spraying time was off which resulted in bugs killing the fruit. So I took his advice and sprayed after half the blossom petals have dropped, then a few weeks later as the fruit was just starting the form. But the same results occurred. On both my peach and pear trees the fruit gets about marble size, then they drop to the ground. It can't be a lack of rain, we had one of the wettest late springs ever in the Mid Atlantic..
That can be your problem. I lost the crop on our apple tree this year. Had a great amount of blooms, but then as they were in their prime came a terrible hard rain driven by 50 plus miles an hour wind. Washed out any pollination that had happened and will have no crop this year.

If you had late real cold weather for a day or two, can kill a crop.

And your spraying when half the pedals dropped. Would make it impossible for the bees, etc., to pollinate the trees as it would kill them if they tried.
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Old 06-20-2016, 04:47 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
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I think it may be a nutrition problem. I'll admit to not giving them a lot of help over the years thinking it was not necessary. This year I gave them some general 10/10/10 but next year I'll take it more seriously. Again the spraying is not stopping the pollination processes as fruit is forming, and it happened to the pear tree for a decade before I did the spray at half pedal fall.
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Old 06-20-2016, 04:57 AM
 
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My apple tree was doing wonderful, only the Asian fruit trees didn't do well. Perhaps the wind killed them off.
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Old 06-20-2016, 05:12 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,177 posts, read 39,371,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
That can be your problem. I lost the crop on our apple tree this year. Had a great amount of blooms, but then as they were in their prime came a terrible hard rain driven by 50 plus miles an hour wind. Washed out any pollination that had happened and will have no crop this year.

If you had late real cold weather for a day or two, can kill a crop.

And your spraying when half the pedals dropped. Would make it impossible for the bees, etc., to pollinate the trees as it would kill them if they tried.

The weather you described is what Dave, and I, had here in Maryland. Very cold and wet Spring with rain, wind and cold at blossoming time.
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Old 06-20-2016, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
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Yep terrible spring but again that didn't stop the trees from fruiting. 2-3 weeks ago that weather had passed and my trees had a lot of fruit, then they all dropped. I have acted on deer, drought by running water out to the trees and bugs by changing my spray time. The only thing I have not done was look at nutrition.
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Old 06-20-2016, 07:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Many trees also have a fruit drop after fruit formation for a number of reasons including having too many. Younger trees are prone to do it.


Shedding Light on Fruit Drop - Stark Bro's
Good link. I also thin out fruits when they are small leaving only one fruits every 5~6 inches. On my plum tree this means I thin out over 80% of fruits! On my Asian pears I thin out 60% of fruits. This resulted in heather tree with bigger & sweeter fruits. Very little fruit drop after thinning.
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Old 06-20-2016, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
9,492 posts, read 5,252,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HB2HSV View Post
Good link. I also thin out fruits when they are small leaving only one fruits every 5~6 inches. On my plum tree this means I thin out over 80% of fruits! On my Asian pears I thin out 60% of fruits. This resulted in heather tree with bigger & sweeter fruits. Very little fruit drop after thinning.
Yeah I heard about doing that, then learned the tree does it naturally. The one year I did it the remain fruit dropped.

Do you fertilize and if so please explain.
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Old 06-20-2016, 08:51 AM
 
4,773 posts, read 8,406,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
Yeah I heard about doing that, then learned the tree does it naturally. The one year I did it the remain fruit dropped.

Do you fertilize and if so please explain.
Yes I fertilize, just using your regular 13-13-13. But I also bury banana peels (good potassium) at base of trees whenever I eat banana. I also cover the base with grass clippings (good nitrogen).

Another factor most do not talk about but I think is important, that is the diameter of the hole you dug for the tree & what mulch do you put in there. I happen to have direct comparisons on my plum & pear trees as each needs a pollinator tree. On each fruit tree I "want" for its fruit production, I dug a wide 5 ft diameter hole. When the tree was young it sort of look ridiculous as a 1 inch diameter trunk in a 5 ft wide hole. But give it 2-3 years the tree grew & the branches extend out makes the hole look just right. I also cover then generously with wood chip mulch. It serves both to retain moisture as well as food for the tree. The worms love it which also help the tree.

On the contrary, for the companion pollinator tree I was not as "enthusiastic" & digging my limestone filled clay is hardwork, I only dug 2~3 ft diameter holes. Now you'd think they would grow slower but just the opposite they grew taller than the other two in bigger holes. On one of them the location is where the compost bin was previously so that may explain it. But for some reason, they don't produce as many fruits and/ or as not good tasting.

So my suggestion is to dig a big hole when you plant new trees. As they say, buy a $5 tree but dig a $50 hole. Hurt once (of my sore back) and reap many years of harvest.

The other thing is prune your fruit trees HARD. They love to be pruned. My peach tree did not grow new leaves until I pruned it. Another theory is if you don't prune the tree out all its energy into growing branches & leaves but not into the fruit production. When I prune while the tree is growing fruit, I cut back its vegetative growth & channel its energy into fruit production. Besides, the fruits I can not reach are the fruits I wasted.
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