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Old 06-23-2016, 11:53 AM
 
391 posts, read 543,924 times
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Hello expert gardeners,


I'm a newbie to the whole gardening thing so please help me. We transplanted a Serrano pepper plant in the ground first of May, it's been growing so nicely except of some leaf miner problem in the first weeks that I treated with neem oil. It started making flowers like a month ago but since then all the flowers have been falling and peppers growing. Last week I noticed this yellow patches on the leaves.
During the first month I fertilized using the starter solution and last weekend I used the miracle gro hose fertilizer. The other pepper plant looks smaller but producing and no leaf spots.
I've attached two pics for the non producing plant. We live in south Texas with high heat and last month we had lots of rain.
Attached Thumbnails
my pepper plant not producing-win_20160623_124532.jpg   my pepper plant not producing-win_20160623_124546.jpg  
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Old 06-23-2016, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
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I wouldn't worry too much. South Texas in the summer is quite the challenge for lots of fruiting plants, I can imagine. Resist the temptation to over-fertilize and over-water. Pepper plants don't mind drying out a bit and they absolutely hate "wet feet". Just keep it well-watered - once the soil is dry 2" down, or two knuckles on your pointer finger, apply additional water. Plants will drop flowers in an effort to conserve energy during very hot weather and will begin setting fruit again once the weather cools a bit. We don't have summers that are nearly as hot as yours and my peppers still don't produce that well until late August into September - then they generally explode with the cooler days and nights.
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Old 06-23-2016, 12:14 PM
 
391 posts, read 543,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickMan7 View Post
I wouldn't worry too much. South Texas in the summer is quite the challenge for lots of fruiting plants, I can imagine. Resist the temptation to over-fertilize and over-water. Pepper plants don't mind drying out a bit and they absolutely hate "wet feet". Just keep it well-watered - once the soil is dry 2" down, or two knuckles on your pointer finger, apply additional water. Plants will drop flowers in an effort to conserve energy during very hot weather and will begin setting fruit again once the weather cools a bit. We don't have summers that are nearly as hot as yours and my peppers still don't produce that well until late August into September - then they generally explode with the cooler days and nights.


Oh thank you so much for your very quick response. So what about the yellow patches on the leaves? They only appeared on that plat.
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Old 06-23-2016, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,138,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NY to LA View Post
Oh thank you so much for your very quick response. So what about the yellow patches on the leaves? They only appeared on that plat.
I see that the plant is near a brick wall - does the hot sun reflect onto the plant or is there something reflective nearby? It doesn't look like disease to me; it looks more like sun scorch/scald since it's more brownish than yellow. Once pepper plants become rooted and well-established, they are pretty darn hardy and don't tend to be overly susceptible to bugs or disease, as long as you're not over-watering. If you're able, try protecting them from intense afternoon sun with some shade cloth or tulle and see if that helps. Again, resist fertilizing in an attempt to resolve an issue you're not sure even exists and make sure that you're not using a fertilizer too high in nitrogen when you do fertilize. That can promote nice green growth, but often at the expense of fruit production. Look for something balanced like 5-5-5 or 5-6-4 or 10-10-10.

I will tell you that I prune my pepper leaves constantly. Anything that gets scorched, torn, eaten, hit by hail, etc. gets pruned regularly (i.e. every 2-3 days). I also prune to thin out the leaves to allow better air flow. New leaves and production stems form almost immediately. Now, of course, I don't remove them all, just a few each time, but within a week I'm amazed at how much the plants change.
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Old 06-23-2016, 12:49 PM
 
391 posts, read 543,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickMan7 View Post
I see that the plant is near a brick wall - does the hot sun reflect onto the plant or is there something reflective nearby? It doesn't look like disease to me; it looks more like sun scorch/scald since it's more brownish than yellow. Once pepper plants become rooted and well-established, they are pretty darn hardy and don't tend to be overly susceptible to bugs or disease, as long as you're not over-watering. If you're able, try protecting them from intense afternoon sun with some shade cloth or tulle and see if that helps. Again, resist fertilizing in an attempt to resolve an issue you're not sure even exists and make sure that you're not using a fertilizer too high in nitrogen when you do fertilize. That can promote nice green growth, but often at the expense of fruit production. Look for something balanced like 5-5-5 or 5-6-4 or 10-10-10.

I will tell you that I prune my pepper leaves constantly. Anything that gets scorched, torn, eaten, hit by hail, etc. gets pruned regularly (i.e. every 2-3 days). I also prune to thin out the leaves to allow better air flow. New leaves and production stems form almost immediately. Now, of course, I don't remove them all, just a few each time, but within a week I'm amazed at how much the plants change.


Thanks again, so for now I should prune the weak leaves to encourage new growth? I won't fertilize for ten more days and see how it goes.
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Old 06-23-2016, 12:50 PM
 
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I have same problem, I blame the hot temperatures lately. Tomato plants doing the same. they grow fast once it is below 80 and not in the 90 or higher temps.

See if every year I have planted them so it doesn't worry me now. Water them to keep them alive, once it cools off they take off
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Old 06-23-2016, 01:04 PM
 
391 posts, read 543,924 times
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Originally Posted by eyeb View Post
I have same problem, I blame the hot temperatures lately. Tomato plants doing the same. they grow fast once it is below 80 and not in the 90 or higher temps.

See if every year I have planted them so it doesn't worry me now. Water them to keep them alive, once it cools off they take off


Can't wait for it to cool down the heat is terrible from 8 am till evening.
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Old 06-23-2016, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,138,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NY to LA View Post
Thanks again, so for now I should prune the weak leaves to encourage new growth? I won't fertilize for ten more days and see how it goes.
The plant looks healthy to me - wouldn't hurt to prune a few of the damaged leaves. The plant will put on newer leaves. Just keep the plant well-watered (not over-watered) and regularly fertilized, following the directions closely, and wait for the weather to cool. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.
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Old 06-23-2016, 06:12 PM
 
3,159 posts, read 3,343,016 times
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It looks like sunburn to me too, and possibly aggravated by fertilizer burn. The next time you fertilize, choose one with a high third number (potassium) and low first number (nitrogen). Adequate potassium protects against drought injury.
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Old 06-24-2016, 10:38 AM
 
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My grandfather taught me a trick that makes peppers produce more peppers. In the bottom of a flat hole where you are going to plant peppers, stick in 6 wood matches with the heads up into the dirt. Peppers need sulfur, but not to much and the 6 matches per plant are just right and at the roots so the plants can feed on the sulfur in the heads of the matches. The number of peppers per plant just about doubles with this trick. When I lived in south Texas (near Laredo) & my daughter lives in west Houston.

Grandpa had a trick for hot weather that worked wonders. Get some 2 foot wood shingles or roof shakes, but shakes need one end sharped with a hatchet to drive into the ground easier. Using the north star a guide, drive one shingle or shake 1" from the foliage of the pepper plant due south of it. Make a semi-circle around the south side of the pepper plant leaving " to spaces between the shingles or shakes. Cut a "V" notch in the top center of the east and west shingles. When the hot weather hits, put a 3/8" to " wood rod with a 8 penny nail driven " outside of the east & west shake with " of the head end sticking up from the top of the rod. A wood roof shake on the south side makes the next step a lot easier - drive a nail into the top and leave " sticking up. Cut pieces of a burlap gunny sack or burlap that you can buy a nursery store so it will drape over each semi-circle 1". Hook it over the 3 nails, and use your garden sprinkling can to wet the burlap. The evaporation will keep the pepper plant cooler.

Last edited by Rance; 06-24-2016 at 09:52 PM.. Reason: Off Topic stuff edited out
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