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Old 06-29-2016, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
336 posts, read 243,212 times
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My giant tomatoes are going good being watered every 2 days or so. I am going away for 6 days this week. Will have someone water. Whats the advice?
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Old 06-29-2016, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Somewhere, out there in Zone7B
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Depends. Are the tomatoes in the ground, raised beds or in pots?


I use to water like you but was told to water less often so the roots will go deep, otherwise they don't set good roots. I now water less often and only do so when I know it's been a good amount of time since we've had rain, or watered and if the tomatoes look a little wilted.


I've been reading about "Dry Farming" and it's quite interesting. I'm actually trying this with a few of my extra tomatoes that came up. Not giving them the attention and care they need to see what happens.


Our Produce | Happy Boy Farms


Six days without water in the summer heat is a bit too much if your plants are use to getting watered every 2 days. Again, depends on pots, raised beds, or in ground to how long they could possibly go. You surely don't want to come home to dead plants.
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Old 06-29-2016, 09:34 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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The weather (temperatures) will affect it. They like to be kept evenly moist, not dry out then get watered, that causes cracking. If every other day is working, stick to it, but more if it gets hotter, less if it gets cooler. When we go away, I put mine on a soaker hose with a timer. If I had someone come and water they would probably eat them while I was gone.
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Old 06-29-2016, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooklynorbust View Post
My giant tomatoes are going good being watered every 2 days or so. I am going away for 6 days this week. Will have someone water. Whats the advice?
Pick up a moisture meter at the Garden Center, around $7.00, have them use it, then nothing will be overwatered. They're e-z to use and it tells you immediately if you're wet, dry, or right on normal. Saves a lot of grief and friendships.
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Old 06-30-2016, 03:08 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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Giant tomatoes in the ground get watered once a week in my location, which is the Philly metro. If there's a heat wave and no rain, twice a week.

Like Eldemila said, you can't just move the watering schedule from two to seven. You have to build up to that. If you're going to only water once a week, the plant should have a huge root system and you have to water very deeply.

How big are giant tomatoes? How tall are the plants? Are they in the ground or in a pot? Pots have to be watered more often.
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Old 06-30-2016, 04:33 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
336 posts, read 243,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
Pick up a moisture meter at the Garden Center, around $7.00, have them use it, then nothing will be overwatered. They're e-z to use and it tells you immediately if you're wet, dry, or right on normal. Saves a lot of grief and friendships.
Good idea thanks
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Old 06-30-2016, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
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ours are not giant, they are in containers and I water them about every 3 days, depending on temps. I test the dirt to see if it is moist under the top. I will be watering today, should have yesterday but we were waiting for the rain. I guess it forgot about us.
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Old 06-30-2016, 12:18 PM
 
391 posts, read 545,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
Pick up a moisture meter at the Garden Center, around $7.00, have them use it, then nothing will be overwatered. They're e-z to use and it tells you immediately if you're wet, dry, or right on normal. Saves a lot of grief and friendships.


I got this and would like to know how to use it. Do you put it all the way down or just through the top two inches? Should the plants be watered when the meter shows dry or moist?


I have tomatoes, peppers, cantaloupe, and eggplant in ground. And more tomatoes in pots.
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Old 06-30-2016, 12:34 PM
 
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Mine are in garden bed, we water them everyday in summer time, unless it rains.
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Old 06-30-2016, 12:44 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NY to LA View Post
I got this and would like to know how to use it. Do you put it all the way down or just through the top two inches? Should the plants be watered when the meter shows dry or moist?


I have tomatoes, peppers, cantaloupe, and eggplant in ground. And more tomatoes in pots.
Even that depends. Poke around gently with a finger to find the roots. People that water frequently but not for long, and/or have hard soil could have healthy looking plants but the roots may be in the top 2-3" below the soil. Those that water deep, less frequently, and/or have good soil may find them going down 6-12". Your moisture meter needs to be inserted to where the roots are.
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