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Old 08-12-2016, 03:50 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA, USA
585 posts, read 255,640 times
Reputation: 1104

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When we lived in a townhouse, I planted tulips in front, in a tiny space allocated for our "yard." The tulips emerged in the spring, and were quite lovely, but one day I returned from an errand, and noticed that all of the heads were sheared off. I immediately suspected the ladies across the courtyard, since they made me cut down my dogwood after raising a fuss about it, but I discovered that the squirrels actually did it!
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Old 08-12-2016, 04:06 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
27,190 posts, read 32,113,591 times
Reputation: 32337
How did they "make" you cut down the dogwood?

OP, I made an almost exact thread about a year ago. We also have people who walk by who will cut flowers, which I wouldn't exactly mind except they're mostly day lilies. Enough so that I'm planning to dig most of them out and put in actual cutting flowers next year.
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Old 08-12-2016, 08:51 AM
 
13,558 posts, read 15,048,659 times
Reputation: 19347
That is awful. I'd be walking around looking for my plant in the thief's flower bed. What's so disturbing is now you won't know which neighbor is to be trusted, cause it obviously is someone close enough to know when to be able to dig without you noticing.
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Old 08-12-2016, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Virginia
1,934 posts, read 746,297 times
Reputation: 5266
I'm not allergic to poison ivy at all, so the next time I planted anything (if someone was stealing my plants), I'd plant some poison ivy right next to it. Then I'd check all my neighbors for a tell-tale rash.
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Old 08-12-2016, 10:56 AM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 2,287,913 times
Reputation: 8376
Keep a security camera aimed at the plants most likely to be stolen. These days security cameras are getting very cost effective. You can afford zillions of them all over the place, aimed at all kinds of stuff, not just plants. When you catch someone stealing something, sue them for thousands of dollars for mental anguish etc. Then sign up with a collection agency to collect it from them.
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Old 08-12-2016, 11:35 AM
 
Location: State of Washington (2016)
2,583 posts, read 1,620,699 times
Reputation: 9034
[. . . "Enter carefully and be on guard for the mother SKUNK and her babies foraging in the garden. If you see them do not disturb them, back away slowly and you should be okay."

. .

.[/quote]

I like this response. It seems like it would be very effective.
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Old 08-12-2016, 11:52 AM
 
1,096 posts, read 1,473,223 times
Reputation: 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eldemila View Post

BTW, are you sure it wasn't a ground hog, or a similar animal that ripped it out of the ground? Not that someone couldn't resist "rehoming" your plant to their yard.
Doubt it was an animal. There is literally nothing left of the plant. Not a trace of root and a hole that is bigger than someone/something just yanking it out of the ground. We do have a woodchuck in our neighborhood that has been known to eat some plants, but he usually just munches off the blooms and stems and leaves the bottom stalks and roots. We live somewhere too populated for bigger animals like deer to be walking down the street munching flowers.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I have had plants stolen from the garden closest to the sidewalk on several occasions. There's three reasons I know of why some people steal plants - they want it for theirself; they want it for a gift for somebody else; they will try to sell it.

The last two reasons I found out when (1) a very distinctive rose plant went missing, I saw it a week later in somebody else's garden and the lady working in the garden said it was a birthday gift given last week from her son and (2) a huge clump of Double-Decker blooming echinacea plants was stolen, it would have been at least a two person job to get the entire clump out of the ground intact. The next weekend I saw the same clump of echinaceas in a massive container being sold for $100 at a farmer's market, along with several other potted perennial plants that I have no doubt were stolen from other people too.

Three years ago I solved my problem. I put a sign up, prominently displayed enough that it can't me missed - it says "Enter carefully and be on guard for the mother SKUNK and her babies foraging in the garden. If you see them do not disturb them, back away slowly and you should be okay."

I did let the postman know that there wasn't really a skunk in the yard. I haven't had any plants stolen since then, nor any uninvited visitors, but I have had plenty of enquiries from strangers wanting to know about the skunk family. I tell them the skunk family lives in a burrow in my yard and are welcome because they are beneficial to my garden.

.

Interesting. Since you located your flowers twice, did you ever confront these people about it? I know I certainly would!


Quote:
Originally Posted by JanND View Post
That is awful. I'd be walking around looking for my plant in the thief's flower bed. What's so disturbing is now you won't know which neighbor is to be trusted, cause it obviously is someone close enough to know when to be able to dig without you noticing.
Yes, my wife wanted to go walk around the neighborhood last night as she was livid but it was beginning to get dark. She was tempted to even go searching in people's trash bins but I had to calm her down - can't do that! My wife is home all day and she said she didn't see or hear anything. We only have one car and I'm at work all day with it, so our driveway was empty, but my wife said it must have happened in the span of 4 hours because she went to get the mail at 3PM and it was still there. I got home at 7PM and it was gone!

Quote:
Originally Posted by eok View Post
Keep a security camera aimed at the plants most likely to be stolen. These days security cameras are getting very cost effective. You can afford zillions of them all over the place, aimed at all kinds of stuff, not just plants. When you catch someone stealing something, sue them for thousands of dollars for mental anguish etc. Then sign up with a collection agency to collect it from them.
Really tempted to do this but hope it doesn't have to come down to this. We hope it was just some weird accident or fluke and nothing malicious actually happened (stealing, just being a jerk, etc). One of the reasons we chose to live in this quieter rural town were for those reasons, a quieter rural town! It's very laid back here and many residents feel very safe here. Weird for something like this to happen...

At this point it would have been great to have had the camera though to just know what happened.
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Old 08-12-2016, 01:27 PM
 
3,551 posts, read 1,921,633 times
Reputation: 11228
How very maddening! I don't know how to prevent adults from bothering my "stuff." Their interference tends to be more on the malicious/sneaky order. But for years I solved the kinds of problems that can occur with children like this:


I invited them to come help me plant. They especially liked the various kinds of hand tools to fool around with. We had plant days around the yard where I'd take them around and explain little facts, name flower parts, make dandelion chains and dollies out of lilies. I taught them the names of the flowers. I even had flower-eating days with cookies and cool aid.


Mom asked, how do you keep so much statuary and knick-knacks out without having damage? And I told her my solution - I went to a hobby store and bought some inexpensive little turtle and lizard-type decorations and tucked them into my shade and rock gardens. I told each child that one was theirs each and that they could name it.


When winter came they were allowed to take their creature home with them to take care of until spring. There was some loss to breakage and moving but it was surprising how many returned with their ornament in the spring.


I even overheard neighborhood kids instructing newcomers as to the rules in our mutual gardens. I did this for years during my empty nest phase and so far it's carried over in our pretty stable neighborhood. Should we see a sudden influx of new rowdy youngsters I'll probably repeat.


Can I still do that these days without being considered a child molester?


Adults - I dunno. Some of them would take all year to behaviorally modify and they have a way of doing these things anonymously. Fie on them all!


The skunk is good. "Poison" spray and fatal curse warnings may also deter others.
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Old 08-12-2016, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
36,567 posts, read 38,655,741 times
Reputation: 97110
Op, I hear this fellow has been
sighted digging in your area
...

Big Foot 2016
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Old 08-12-2016, 06:50 PM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 2,287,913 times
Reputation: 8376
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_grimace View Post
At this point it would have been great to have had the camera though to just know what happened.
Exactly. Regardless of taking action against them, just knowing what happened makes it worth having the cameras. They're getting more and more cost effective. You can buy zillions of them without it costing a lot of money. When you have the camera, and find out it was a groundhog or gopher, it saves you a lot of anxiety, not worrying about neighbors with criminal tendencies. The cameras should be recording constantly. The storage media they record on is very cheap these days. A hard disk that holds a terabyte, or some such amount. All the cameras can be connected to one central unit with storage. You only have to review the recordings when you're investigating an incident. Otherwise you just let them age and get recycled when the hard disk space gets used up, some months or years in the future.

You should also be aware that just because you see your prize plants in someone else's yard doesn't mean they were stolen. Wherever you got yours, they might have got theirs there too.
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