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Old 01-07-2017, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
366 posts, read 492,075 times
Reputation: 445

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I basically have a small worm farm in my fridge right now, because of a fishing trip that did not use all of them. I just checked and they are still alive, but they have lots of hard black stuff along with them, worm castings I believe. I'm wondering if I should clean all of that out and replace it with coffee grounds, since I read that worms LOVE coffee. I sprinkled a little bit in there already so they have food, but, I'm wondering if that would be too much.

I'd probably have a lot of small wiggly drug addicts too, so there's that...lol
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Old 01-07-2017, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Constitutional USA, zn.8A
685 posts, read 182,766 times
Reputation: 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Draconiator View Post
I basically have a small worm farm in my fridge
right now because of a fishing trip that did not use all of them. I just checked and they are still alive,
I read that worms LOVE coffee.
I sprinkled a little bit in there already so they have food, but,
I'd probably have a lot of small wiggly drug addicts too, so there's that...lol
What kind of worms? - Too a few years ago you posted having a garden.
Have you ever seen worms in your garden... where worms live + thrive you know.

Other than going fishing real quick, before you kill them in the fridge's COLD,
the only reason to force them to stay there, is to do postmortems on them. Doubt that.

Get them out where they belong, & blanket them with hopefully fertile soil. Later coffee grounds are okay.
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Old 01-07-2017, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
12,994 posts, read 4,958,813 times
Reputation: 6568
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2 rainbows View Post
What kind of worms? - Too a few years ago you posted having a garden.
Have you ever seen worms in your garden... where worms live + thrive you know.

Other than going fishing real quick, before you kill them in the fridge's COLD,
the only reason to force them to stay there, is to do postmortems on them. Doubt that.

Get them out where they belong, & blanket them with hopefully fertile soil. Later coffee grounds are okay.
This not good advice.

OP, do you know what kind of worms you have?

If they are night crawlers, etc, they will normally be hardy in your climate, but releasing them on the surface of frozen ground will kill them. These worms are deep burrowers (3 feet or more), but they can't burrow into frozen ground. If you're serious about trying to keep them going until the ground thaws enough for them to burrow, then maybe you could try dumping a couple bags of potting soil into a plastic trash can in a place that won't freeze, and let them burrow down into that. Release them in the spring.

If they are red wrigglers, tiger worms or brandlings, then they are probably compost or manure worms, and they'll eat your kitchen garbage all year around. They are not winter-hardy in your climate, and they do not burrow deeply into the soil to protect themselves from weather extremes. Their normal habitat is at the interface between the ground and a pile of organic matter.

Here's a good overview on how to keep them - Worm composting | Metro

If you seriously get into this, plowing around on this site will tell you way more than what you need to know - Red Worm Composting | Red Wiggler Worms, European Nightcrawlers and loads of helpful Worm Composting Information Start with this page - http://www.redwormcomposting.com/qui...rm-composting/

Last edited by jacqueg; 01-07-2017 at 05:10 PM..
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Old 01-07-2017, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
366 posts, read 492,075 times
Reputation: 445
Just plain old earthworms. I'm surprised they are still alive even. I intended to use them, but they stayed in the fridge. heh.
they seemed really healthy when I checked them too.
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Old 01-07-2017, 11:25 PM
 
Location: British Columbia
4,031 posts, read 4,459,894 times
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The fridge is too cold for them so you do need to get them out of the fridge if you want them to live and to breed. I'd suggest putting them in a garbage bin in some loose, fluffy, easily aerated soil that is kept lightly moist but not wet or easily packed down. Put the bin somewhere that is slightly cool to normal room temperature and allows good air circulation to the worm bin.

Go easy on the coffee grounds, worms cannot be sustained on coffee grounds alone and too much of it is toxic. Worms do like to eat used coffee grounds in moderation along with other organic foods in their soil and the coffee grit aids with their digestion of other organic materials. But too much coffee grounds will cause the acids in the coffee grounds to burn their skin and kill them. Likewise with anything that has a very high citric acid content. I'd recommend giving coffee grounds to them only once a week for as long as you have them confined to a bin where they don't have much freedom of movement. Better to give too little instead of too much. You can give them oatmeal, cornmeal, leaves, fruit and vegetable peels and pieces of fruit and vegetable scraps. You'll probably find other suggestions in some of the websites that Jacqueg offered.

NO onions or citrus fruits or citrus peels or pickles or anything else that has high citric acid or salt or vinegar content in it. If in doubt about a food to give, ask yourself "Is this something that might cause eye sensitivity for me (like onions)? Or that I could safely keep in contact with my own skin for a long time without worrying about skin sensitivity?" If the answer is no for your own skin then don't give it to the worms.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 01-07-2017 at 11:34 PM..
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Old 01-07-2017, 11:50 PM
 
Location: British Columbia
4,031 posts, read 4,459,894 times
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Another little tip for you if you are going to keep them in a bin and want easy access to them without having to dig down deep to get to them. Take a stick and gently tap the outside of the bin down at the bottom. Tap round and round the bottom of the bin slowly and gradually rising up to the middle. The disturbing tapping sound and vibration will cause the worms to quickly rise to the surface to escape what they instinctively believe to be digging moles coming from below to eat them.

.
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Old 01-09-2017, 02:04 AM
 
Location: Constitutional USA, zn.8A
685 posts, read 182,766 times
Reputation: 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
This not good advice.
Considering the OP's presentation... of keeping worms in a fridge, maybe he was only jokingly starting this? - and
later confirming he has no clue as to the different kinds of worms " Just plain old earthworms ", a brief response was adequate, until he shows more interest.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
releasing them on the surface of frozen ground will kill them.
NO one even suggested your ridiculous interpretation.

What I said was "Get them out where they belong, & blanket them with hopefully fertile soil." - Anybody with any gardening experience knows what FERTILE-soil consists of = organic matter, iow he could give them any non-acidic veggie & fruit scraps & peels, but especially leaves as they contain minerals, (especially Trace-minerals that most people seriously lack!, btw). And the "blanket"-part was just to make sure they can stay covered because they need to be able to burrow for their safety, particularly from extreme weather.

At the fair, people both sell & buy way too many ridiculously-expensive "worm Composters/Factories",
ex https://www.amazon.com/Worm-Factory-.../dp/B002LH47PY , that
were the OP to only read that advertisement, he will know what to use to maintain worms in a cheap stacked container inside.
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Old 01-09-2017, 10:33 PM
 
Location: McKinleyville, California
6,406 posts, read 8,222,700 times
Reputation: 4120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
The fridge is too cold for them so you do need to get them out of the fridge if you want them to live and to breed. I'd suggest putting them in a garbage bin in some loose, fluffy, easily aerated soil that is kept lightly moist but not wet or easily packed down. Put the bin somewhere that is slightly cool to normal room temperature and allows good air circulation to the worm bin.

Go easy on the coffee grounds, worms cannot be sustained on coffee grounds alone and too much of it is toxic. Worms do like to eat used coffee grounds in moderation along with other organic foods in their soil and the coffee grit aids with their digestion of other organic materials. But too much coffee grounds will cause the acids in the coffee grounds to burn their skin and kill them. Likewise with anything that has a very high citric acid content. I'd recommend giving coffee grounds to them only once a week for as long as you have them confined to a bin where they don't have much freedom of movement. Better to give too little instead of too much. You can give them oatmeal, cornmeal, leaves, fruit and vegetable peels and pieces of fruit and vegetable scraps. You'll probably find other suggestions in some of the websites that Jacqueg offered.

NO onions or citrus fruits or citrus peels or pickles or anything else that has high citric acid or salt or vinegar content in it. If in doubt about a food to give, ask yourself "Is this something that might cause eye sensitivity for me (like onions)? Or that I could safely keep in contact with my own skin for a long time without worrying about skin sensitivity?" If the answer is no for your own skin then don't give it to the worms.

.
I have two compost heaps, one is a huge hot compost heap, worms are only at the edge and bottom of that one, the other one is smaller, about 3 cubic yards, it gets all the vegetable clippings from the house, plus chicken manure from the chicken coop and leaves from the yard. The earth worms love coffee grounds and even onion skins, but what they really go after are avocado skins and pits, they devour the pits. When I toss oranges into the heap, I find them later covered in earthworms in a writhing mass.
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Old 01-11-2017, 01:26 PM
Status: "Achilles is in your alleyway, he doesn't want me here" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
17,849 posts, read 17,286,365 times
Reputation: 26831
how about, teeny-tiny birds?
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Old 01-11-2017, 01:59 PM
 
Location: British Columbia
4,031 posts, read 4,459,894 times
Reputation: 5320
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDragonslayer View Post
I have two compost heaps, one is a huge hot compost heap, worms are only at the edge and bottom of that one, the other one is smaller, about 3 cubic yards, it gets all the vegetable clippings from the house, plus chicken manure from the chicken coop and leaves from the yard. The earth worms love coffee grounds and even onion skins, but what they really go after are avocado skins and pits, they devour the pits. When I toss oranges into the heap, I find them later covered in earthworms in a writhing mass.
My post was in regard to worms that are kept confined to a worm bin where their freedom of movement is restricted and they have no place to escape to in the event their environment becomes uncomfortable or inhospitable for them due to human error. Your compost heaps are the ideal environment for worms in that you can compost whatever you want, including oranges, and the worms can come and go as they please, eat what they want when they want and still maintain their own comfort and safety zones.

.
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