U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-11-2017, 05:13 PM
 
4,543 posts, read 1,683,007 times
Reputation: 7964

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
This is what our bushes are. The tree guy says their red tip, which I have heard are junk bushes. I am hoping they are not. Anyway, they grow well in this climate.
In Dallas, red tip photinias are standard residential bushes, used for privacy screens and decoration. I think they have blooms in Spring. Very hardy, disease resistant in that area, can be kept pruned or allowed to grow 10 feet tall. Birds and animals love 'em.

Not as high quality as the Nellie R. Stevens and other hollies, but they grow faster. Nothing prettier than the hollies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-11-2017, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Floribama
11,191 posts, read 24,792,305 times
Reputation: 8380
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post

I've been reading up on the photinia, and I think, instead, they are a different but similar plant. Photinia are extremely prone to disease here, so I think if that is what they were, they would not have lasted 25 years.
There are some old ones around here, so don't believe everything you read online. If they are grown very close together they are more disease prone, since it reduces airflow and allows the leaves to stay wet longer than they should. Removing the pear trees will give them more sunlight and help them thrive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2017, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Floribama
11,191 posts, read 24,792,305 times
Reputation: 8380
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
They are very popular with native wildlife. A lot of food between their buds, petals and fruits. And the sapsuckers love them to. More popular and environmentally appropriate than many purely ornamental trees. Mind you, the blossom definitely has an aroma that doesn't please.


As for their branches, its generally simply lopping off horizontal boughs is all that's needed.


Id rather see a forest of Bradford pears than one more goddarn leylandii
Pear trees are not native to North America, and the fruits have almost no nutritional value to wildlife. They have started spreading into natural areas and are indeed creating forests of pear trees with vicious thorns.

There are better flowering trees such as Serviceberry, Washington Hawthorn, Crabapple, Silverbell, and Redbud.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2017, 07:47 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
26,966 posts, read 33,822,833 times
Reputation: 43006
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Pear trees are not native to North America, and the fruits have almost no nutritional value to wildlife. They have started spreading into natural areas and are indeed creating forests of pear trees with vicious thorns.

There are better flowering trees such as Serviceberry, Washington Hawthorn, Crabapple, Silverbell, and Redbud.
Bradford Pears do not have fruit, or thorns. They have a nice shape, are low growing and look pretty when they flower. They have a nice oval shape in the suburban yard. Fast forward to when they are mature, and then they're not so great. Ours were almost 30 years old, and the very heavy limbs started to snap off in every storm. We decided they had to go, before they took out the neighbor's fence and cost us a lot more than cutting down the trees did.

We do not have a huge yard, and still have a mature oak which is enough for shade and to support the birds and squirrels, which we enjoy. We will replace the Pears with more tall shrubs to provide privacy along our fence line, and it will be super fun to see what other options we have now that there is more light in the back yard...healthier lawn, bushier understory shrubs like azaleas, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2017, 08:37 PM
 
4,065 posts, read 7,258,564 times
Reputation: 2843
When 'southernnaturelover' writes a comment, I read it knowing that he is correct on plants. Bradford pears are becoming invasive and reverting to Callery pears. They are a big problem.

Quote:
When you see those fields of white flowering trees, please don’t get giddy with excitement over pretty white flowers. What you are looking at are Callery pears destroying nature. Callery pears have 4 inch thorns. They can’t be mowed down. Those thorns will shred John Deere tractor tires. They can only be removed by steel tracked dozers, decreasing the value of agricultural or forest land to the tune of $3,000 per acre.

And, make no mistake about this. That solitary Bradford pear growing in your yard is what caused this problem. Your one tree has spawned hundreds of evil progeny. If you don’t believe that, just take a little ride, and notice all the white flowering trees blooming these days. The closer they are to “ornamental” Bradford pear trees, the thicker they are.

If you want to save the world, cut down your Bradford pear trees. I could not be more serious about this.
The Curse of the Bradford Pear
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2017, 04:06 AM
 
6,942 posts, read 5,212,156 times
Reputation: 1142
You may have to then fix the grass as the lack of shade will make it more hot in the summer where you will have to help the grass grow like new seed
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2017, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Floribama
11,191 posts, read 24,792,305 times
Reputation: 8380
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Bradford Pears do not have fruit, or thorns. They have a nice shape, are low growing and look pretty when they flower. They have a nice oval shape in the suburban yard. Fast forward to when they are mature, and then they're not so great. Ours were almost 30 years old, and the very heavy limbs started to snap off in every storm. We decided they had to go, before they took out the neighbor's fence and cost us a lot more than cutting down the trees did.

We do not have a huge yard, and still have a mature oak which is enough for shade and to support the birds and squirrels, which we enjoy. We will replace the Pears with more tall shrubs to provide privacy along our fence line, and it will be super fun to see what other options we have now that there is more light in the back yard...healthier lawn, bushier understory shrubs like azaleas, etc.
Callery pears (aka 'Bradford', 'Cleveland', 'Chanticleer', etc) do produce fruit, but they're small, sometimes the size of a pea. When birds eat these fruits they spread the seeds into wooded areas, it is these wild offspring that have the thorns, and the fruit on those usually end up being golf ball sized, although they're wild so it varies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2017, 04:06 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
26,966 posts, read 33,822,833 times
Reputation: 43006
So, this weekend is heavenly weather. It feeds the soul of those of us who like to get outside in the yard.
DH and I have been pruning the bushes, no longer shaded by the trees that were removed, that line the back fence. We have decimated the poor things (correct pruning practices, I think), but in a year or so they will thank us. Some of the poor branches had stretched two bushes over to reach the light.
So we will finish trimming tomorrow, give them some sweet talk and fertilizer and see what happens. We have asked a garden center, and a botanical garden to find out what they are, so we can get a few more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2017, 11:31 PM
 
489 posts, read 462,003 times
Reputation: 872
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Two fully mature trees with lots of branches and tons of big roots, $1050. including stump grinding. That also includes a 3rd much smaller tree which I think is costing $100. Not bad, considering there have been 6 guys working all day, a skid steer, a stump grinder and a wood chipper. DH isn't too thrilled with the way the yard is full of ruts and there are still some roots left, but hopefully they will attempt to fix this.

I've been reading up on the photinia, and I think, instead, they are a different but similar plant. Photinia are extremely prone to disease here, so I think if that is what they were, they would not have lasted 25 years.
I got two quotes, here in Northern California, for removal of my two Bradfords. One was for $1300, including stump grinding, plus $300 to plant one small replacement tree of a species I've never heard of and have now forgotten but is considered invasive by our HOA. The second quote was $1000 for removal and grinding, plus our local city will provide a voucher for one approved replacement tree which will be $50 to plant. Both of these quotes came from licensed arborists. So it pays to shop around. Yes, I've checked references and the second company has stellar ones, while the first, more expensive one, has a lot of negative ones. Guess who's getting the job?!

Thanks for sharing your experience, gentlearts. I learn so much from this board.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2017, 06:50 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
26,966 posts, read 33,822,833 times
Reputation: 43006
The tree voucher thing is interesting. I don't think we have this here. In Ohio, we were able to get free trees in the spring, through the County Extension Service.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $99,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top