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Old 02-05-2017, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Unpacking & fixer-upping!
73 posts, read 109,844 times
Reputation: 97

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I'm living in USDA Zone 5b and our yard is surrounded by cornfields (so we're always being hit with winds from all directions). Our soil is predominantly clay, although there are a few sections of the yard that have sandy soil. I should also mention that our yard suffers from a natural spring (below the surface) that runs diagonally across the back yard and splits partly to the front yard. This makes much of the ground space permanently damp (or sometimes full on waterlogged) unless we have a drought (like the year we bought the house and didn't know anything about the spring situation and the impact on the yard.

I want to be able to grow Rosemary and Lavender outdoors in fairly large amounts (appx 16 plants of each) and have made the assumption that I'll probably need to put them in raised beds sot hat the roots won't rot.

I'm concerned that the wind will be a large problem as well and was wondering if I need to build some kind of protective enclosure to go over the plants in the late fall/winter and then off after the frosts of spring have passed? (I know I should try to find the 'arp' variety of rosemary as that is supposedly more cold hardy...any ideas about where I can find it, and if there is a similarly hardy version of the lavender?

Does anyone have any constructive thoughts on this, or on the protective enclosure idea, and has anyone else done this?

Thanks in advance for any ideas!
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Old 02-05-2017, 04:41 PM
 
Location: British Columbia
3,413 posts, read 3,919,914 times
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There was a discussion here about rosemary last autumn and I think someone posted a link to a herb farm where you might be able to get the best rosemary for your location. Here is the link to that thread: Rosemary

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Old 02-06-2017, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Loveland, CO
145 posts, read 106,014 times
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As you've alluded, both prefer xeric conditions with longer dry spells. If the ground is too moist, I'd go ahead and put them in raised beds as you mentioned and mulch them well. I grow tons of each in my yard here in Colorado with lots of wind, so I don't think the wind should be a problem. I'd water each once a week or less with a good soaking, then allow the roots to dry between. If your area gets a lot of moisture, you may have issues even in raised beds, I'd think.
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Old 02-07-2017, 08:56 AM
 
4,339 posts, read 3,845,943 times
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My rosemary bush will see its 4th year this summer, zone 5 something. I planted it in a large container and move it indoor (barely above freezing is ok), it doesnt need much light to overwinter either.
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Old 02-09-2017, 01:17 PM
 
5,450 posts, read 1,517,010 times
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Even below freezing is ok for rosemary for short periods. I live where winter temps at night may go down into the low 20s and even teens sometimes and the rosemary thrives. The problem comes when the temps stay that low night and day for several days.
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Old 02-11-2017, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Unpacking & fixer-upping!
73 posts, read 109,844 times
Reputation: 97
Thank you everyone who took the time to comment

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
There was a discussion here about rosemary last autumn and I think someone posted a link to a herb farm where you might be able to get the best rosemary for your location. Here is the link to that thread: Rosemary

.
Thank you I'm looking at it this weekend

Quote:
Originally Posted by EastwardBound View Post
As you've alluded, both prefer xeric conditions with longer dry spells. If the ground is too moist, I'd go ahead and put them in raised beds as you mentioned and mulch them well. I grow tons of each in my yard here in Colorado with lots of wind, so I don't think the wind should be a problem. I'd water each once a week or less with a good soaking, then allow the roots to dry between. If your area gets a lot of moisture, you may have issues even in raised beds, I'd think.
Thank you for your experience. I'm worried that the raised beds will still have issues since our property tends to be moist most of the time (due to the layers of clay under the grass) Do you think if I made the raised beds like, 2 feet high, that that might help with avoiding wet root/ root rot/ roots freezing in the winter?

Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Even below freezing is ok for rosemary for short periods. I live where winter temps at night may go down into the low 20s and even teens sometimes and the rosemary thrives. The problem comes when the temps stay that low night and day for several days.
Thanks. I'm currently doing that with my lavender (living in the kitchen) and my small rosemary but my husband has put his foot down and said that they are not allowed in the house next winter so I need to find a solution
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Old 02-11-2017, 12:23 PM
 
Location: British Columbia
3,413 posts, read 3,919,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheekyerica View Post

........ I'm currently doing that with my lavender (living in the kitchen) and my small rosemary but my husband has put his foot down and said that they are not allowed in the house next winter so I need to find a solution
There is a solution. You put your own foot down with your husband and make him install a heated greenhouse for you that your plants can live in during the winter.

.
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Old 02-11-2017, 06:17 PM
 
1 posts, read 276 times
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Maybe put them in the garage to protect them at least somewhat? Then out in sun during day? You could also just bring them to a room he doesn't go in much...personally, I would just ask my husband what he has against them and try and address that!
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Old 02-13-2017, 03:36 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
27,033 posts, read 33,904,659 times
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When I was in zone 5, I had to treat both of those as annuals. I believe the only herb that wintered over was sage.
I think that potted, in a sunny window is your best shot.
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Old Today, 05:03 AM
 
126 posts, read 38,369 times
Reputation: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
There is a solution. You put your own foot down with your husband and
make him install a heated greenhouse for you that your plants can live in during the winter.
Amen. lol how funny
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