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Old 02-17-2017, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
24,495 posts, read 58,948,501 times
Reputation: 26326

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
My neighbor has a bunch of Norway maples that are now 50-60 years old. I hate them. The dang roots travel along the surface and come into my yard, making me trip on them. He never maintained them, so they have too many trunks, most of which are weak, and which make the tree dangerous. We just paid to have 2 of them hauled out (with the neighbor's OK, of course) because they were dropping giant branches in every storm, and it was just a matter of time before our car or house got crushed. Neighbor wasn't ever going to do anything about them. As for his giant, sickly pine trees that creak and sway with every gust of wind, well, they are nice and far from my house.

He just paid bunch of $$$ to have maple roots cleared out of his septic system, too.
Eeek.

Not an issue for my dad. He is on 3 acres, neighbor is on 110.
Septic field is in the back and he knows not to allow anything but grass to grow there.

Only one maple seems to have surface roots. The pines/firs do not
. There is a bamboo tree of some kind my SIL gave my mother as a houseplant. It kept getting bigger so mom planted it outside. Despite the cold climate, it has thrived and gotten quite large. THat has some surface roots.
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Old 02-18-2017, 09:50 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
33,933 posts, read 42,118,581 times
Reputation: 56018
Just a word about remaining surface roots after cutting down trees. DH goes nuts with his sawzall, and it quickly dispatches any roots that dare get in the way of future plantings. It works good.
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Old 03-23-2017, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,408 posts, read 2,077,268 times
Reputation: 404
Based on what you presented, no brainer, cut them out.



Quote:
Originally Posted by maybemoving13 View Post
I have two large trees in my backyard. One is a pecan tree and I think the other is some sort of oak. They are tall, about 15 inches in diameter each, and located right next to each other. There is only about 2 ft. between the trunks. I'm seriously thinking about having them removed.

Has anyone cut down a tree and then regretted it?

Here are the issues I have with the trees:
1. They are so close to our house that the limbs create the perfect way for squirrels to get on our roof/house.
2. I had the trees trimmed last year, and the arborist suggested that for the health of the trees, I leave as many branches as possible. It has only been a year and I am in need of another trim.
3. The amount of leaves is insane. For 3 years I've been raking, blowing, mulching, etc these leaves. There isn't enough space under the trees to pile the leaves there, so 80% of the leaves have to be picked up and brought to the curb. This is probably my number one issue, because it makes my not love living in this house. I have gotten quotes to have the yard work done, and it is $80-100 each time they come.
4. There is so much shade that grass wont grow in some spots.
5. They are right in the middle of the yard, blocking free space to play sports or to just enjoy the lawn.

I'm not concerned about losing too much shade because there are other large trees in a common area just beyond our lot.

I am concerned about making the decision to cut them down and regretting it, but I can't think of any actual reasons why I would regret it.

If you've cut down a tree, please let me know what your experience was. Thanks!
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Old 07-13-2017, 10:02 PM
 
1 posts, read 632 times
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I live in an neighborhood in Michigan that is specifically known for it's large beautiful trees. Most of the trees are beach, maple, a variety of oak and hemlock. These trees are huge, many of the them stand 100ft tall and are probably 100 - 125 years old. Anyways, some of the hemlocks were diseased and close to the house so we had 4 of them taken out. I don't regret those ones. We also had a couple of black oaks that were looking unhealthy and were close the house so we took those ones down. Then there was the maple tree that stood near the middle of our yard in a cluster with 3 beach trees and a white oak. All of them over 80ft tall. The maple tree was a mighty and healthy tree. It was beautiful, but it leaned toward our house and if it ever did fall it would have come down directly over the master bedroom in our house and literally slice it in half. I used to watch that tree sway in windstorms and always get nervous. So...I had originally just planned to have that maple trimmed up to get some of the weight off of it, but in my haste I told the trimmer to just cut it down. Now it's gone it looks and feels so bare where it used to be. I did have it cut down for the safety of the house and my family because if it ever did fall, it was coming strait for the house as I said. However, there are a lot of trees in my neighbors yards even that potentially could fall on my house. I look at the spot where that tree used to be and almost feel criminal that I had such a beautiful, mature tree (probably 100 years old) cut down. If it could talk, I can only imagine the stories it would have to tell of the storms it weathered, the eagles, grey owels and red tail hawks it sheltered and the children who have played under it's canopy. I'll get over it, but for the time I feel pretty bad.
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Old 07-23-2017, 10:50 PM
 
Location: oakville
10 posts, read 3,328 times
Reputation: 11
There are plenty of good reasons to remove these trees from your property. But personally, It’s quite hard for me to agree with this idea as I am a “tree lover”. Gardening demands husbandry, patience, continuous regimen and humility. Whatever you mentioned about taking care of these trees- I think it won't be that hard if you give it a little time and patience. The “so much shade” problem - You can grow a pretty swath of lawn in a shady spot, as long as you pick the right grass and take care of it properly. This way you can enjoy the lawn in the shade.Doesn’t that sound good? Maybe you can get the best advice from a professional service in your locality. The shades can also cut down your summer air conditioning costs and significantly reduce your energy bills. I have recently planted a flowering dogwood for the same reason.
And about trimming issues-Roofing contractors recommend that you can trim all branches that come within six feet of your roof. Trim out all the branches hanging over your roof. This will not only prevent small animals from scampering across your roof, you will also protect your home from potential tree damage caused by severe weather.
I don’t really think it’s going to affect the tree’s health unless you over prune it (am not sure about this).
If it stands really close to fall on your roof when exposed to pouring rain, snow or high winds, you can consider taking down the tree as they are a major threat to your property and life in such conditions. Also, you can take care of the fallen leaves by skipping raking completely by mowing over leaves and chopping them into small pieces.
You can allow the leaf pieces to decompose in place on the lawn. To do this, chop leaves into dime-size pieces. You may need to mow over them several times depending on the size of the leaves and the depth of the layer. Maybe my suggestions aren’t worth to stop you from doing it. But think of the time it took to evolve. Respect its age and if you find a way out ‘please don’t do it’. Nothing can really replace them.
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Old 07-23-2017, 11:26 PM
 
10,266 posts, read 3,517,235 times
Reputation: 4555
We have six large mesquites in the front of our home. They were deliberately placed to block the summer sun while allowing the winter one.

They are however a constant battle. They have good water so they grow like weeds. But they actually damage themselves. If left alone they grow huge branches which fail under the weight of the foilage. They also have to be kept clean on the interior or they blow down in the winds.

Last spring $3,000 worth of trimming to keep them under control and off the roof. And next week the gardener is going to whack off 10 feet and 1000 lbs from a limb getting too far iton the street.

So we will never take them out. But we will spend even more money keepint the blooming things under control.
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Old 07-24-2017, 03:52 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
12,593 posts, read 10,308,138 times
Reputation: 8756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Eeek.

Not an issue for my dad. He is on 3 acres, neighbor is on 110.
Septic field is in the back and he knows not to allow anything but grass to grow there.

Only one maple seems to have surface roots. The pines/firs do not
. There is a bamboo tree of some kind my SIL gave my mother as a houseplant. It kept getting bigger so mom planted it outside. Despite the cold climate, it has thrived and gotten quite large. THat has some surface roots.
Don't turn your back on your bamboo: Invasive Bamboo: Rethink Planting it in Your Garden | HGTV.

As far as trees too close to any home; it is far easier/cheaper to get rid of them when small. Especially if you identify them as any potential problem. What goes up, even if it is nature; will come down at sometime in the future. The limbs can be lethal or debilitating if you are hit by one: https://www.reiffandbily.com/100-peo...united-states/. I do know that statistically your chance of being hit are very small; almost like winning the Power Ball - but that does not mean you should never worry. Of course the roots can damage foundations, septic systems, and damage driveways and walkways. Then you have the leaves that can clog gutter systems and start mold/moss growing on your roof and that is not even mentioning damage from falling limbs.

If you have a large tree, planted within the reach of your building, remove it while you can before you have to hire expensive tree removal services. Then replace it with trees of the appropriate size.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
5,798 posts, read 8,302,947 times
Reputation: 10606
The huge Apricot tree I wrote about in another thread is coming down. Getting a quote this week. Sick of picking up thousands of apricots on the ground, all bird pecked, unedible and squashed into a bloody mess. If I could somehow prevent the tree from producing (like a vasectomy?), I would do it. Will lose alot of shade and beautiful spring blossoms. The ants LOVE the fruit. I hate it.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:36 AM
bg7
 
7,698 posts, read 7,522,012 times
Reputation: 14986
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhxBarb View Post
The huge Apricot tree I wrote about in another thread is coming down. Getting a quote this week. Sick of picking up thousands of apricots on the ground, all bird pecked, unedible and squashed into a bloody mess. If I could somehow prevent the tree from producing (like a vasectomy?), I would do it. Will lose alot of shade and beautiful spring blossoms. The ants LOVE the fruit. I hate it.
Goddarn nature.


Certainly a good bargain - shade, blossoms and wildlife versus not having to clean up anything.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:53 AM
 
5,917 posts, read 3,986,737 times
Reputation: 16250
We removed two and regret one of them.

One was a black walnut. It was mostly healthy, though buggy. It was not planted in a particularly appropriate area. The constant dropped nuts and staining of every single thing under its canopy was the last straw. And the bug issue. We donated the usable wood (wasn't as much as we thought) to a neighbor who is a woodworker and he made us a couple beautiful items for our table. I don't miss that one.

On the other side of the yard we had a huge ash tree. Just beautiful. Shaded half our house. I'd lie on a float in our pool and just stare at the canopy and relax. The dropped seed pods didn't bother me THAT much. Our tree guy, though, said he could only trim it so much at this point without getting a bucket truck because of the way the canopy grew over our tile roof. Cha-ching $$$$. Also, he said (and was right), that it is too close to the house and we were assured to have plumbing and foundation issues soon. I miss that tree. That side of the house gets hotter now about 3-4 hours earlier in the day.
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