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Old 02-17-2017, 10:40 AM
 
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I've grown pretty tired of constantly having to cleanup the weeds and crab grass that spreads around my garden. I'm tempted this year to use landscape fabric either between the rows or across the whole garden with areas cut or opened up for the individual plants.

Does anyone have any experience or feel one way or another on this topic? What worked for you?
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Old 02-17-2017, 12:33 PM
Status: "Livin' it up in the United States of Russia" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clutchrider View Post
I've grown pretty tired of constantly having to cleanup the weeds and crab grass that spreads around my garden. I'm tempted this year to use landscape fabric either between the rows or across the whole garden with areas cut or opened up for the individual plants.

Does anyone have any experience or feel one way or another on this topic? What worked for you?

try using straw or grass clippings as mulch, both are easy to move to the large compost pile at the end of the year if you are so inclined, or don't want to till the mulch back into the soil
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Old 02-17-2017, 12:40 PM
 
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I typically till the area pretty well as well as add in fresh soil and manure and till again. This year I am borrowing a friends broadfork to really break up the soil down below where the tiller can get. But your saying just putting straw over the whole garden will work? Or should I make sure the areas I am planting/transplanting should remain open to the soil?
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Old 02-17-2017, 01:22 PM
Status: "Livin' it up in the United States of Russia" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clutchrider View Post
I typically till the area pretty well as well as add in fresh soil and manure and till again. This year I am borrowing a friends broadfork to really break up the soil down below where the tiller can get. But your saying just putting straw over the whole garden will work? Or should I make sure the areas I am planting/transplanting should remain open to the soil?

leave open areas for you rows or plants, but you'll find that the weeds will generally just be confined to those open areas and take far less time to remove or hoe.

tilling while good for breaking up and turning in amendments, also brings many weed seeds back up to the surface.
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Old 02-17-2017, 01:48 PM
 
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That's what chickens and goats are for
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Old 02-17-2017, 11:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
leave open areas for you rows or plants, but you'll find that the weeds will generally just be confined to those open areas and take far less time to remove or hoe.

tilling while good for breaking up and turning in amendments, also brings many weed seeds back up to the surface.
So maybe just some light taking, new amendments added and then the broad fork to break up the soil a bit instead of turning it.
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Old 02-18-2017, 09:33 AM
Status: "Livin' it up in the United States of Russia" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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Originally Posted by clutchrider View Post
So maybe just some light taking, new amendments added and then the broad fork to break up the soil a bit instead of turning it.
it would really depend on your soil ...you're in Connecticut right? Think Cambium is there and I believe he has rocky and clay(?) soil. In that case I think you want to get as much organic material in as possible. Depending on how much area you're working with, you may need a tiller. I try and not go too deep (4-5") when I till but I'm working with sandy soil. I think I do notice a difference in the resulting weed growth between tilling 2-3" and 5-6".

I have used straw as mulch before but my grass clippings are free and is easily removed come fall cleanup.
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Old 02-18-2017, 09:43 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
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Fabric does help, but only for awhile. We have ripped most of ours out.
Although water penetrates the fabric, the good compost cannot break down and enrich the soil.
Also, after a year or two the mulch and compost that is on top of the fabric will support weeds anyway.
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Old 02-21-2017, 08:08 AM
 
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Sounds like I may give a few hay bales a try since it's readily available in my area. Cam is in CT, I've spoken to him a few times in another thread about gardening, great knowledge base. My area is red rock so the soil gets very clay like down a few inches, maybe having a yard of soil dropped for me to add in would help build up the ground a bit instead of just throwing some bags at the area.

My other issue is with burrowers getting under the wooden border, tempted to put some thin metal mesh wire buried around the edge about 6" or so.

Garden is about 12x20, expanding it to 12x30 this year.
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Old 02-21-2017, 08:24 AM
Status: "Livin' it up in the United States of Russia" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
16,933 posts, read 16,357,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clutchrider View Post
Sounds like I may give a few hay bales a try since it's readily available in my area. Cam is in CT, I've spoken to him a few times in another thread about gardening, great knowledge base. My area is red rock so the soil gets very clay like down a few inches, maybe having a yard of soil dropped for me to add in would help build up the ground a bit instead of just throwing some bags at the area.

My other issue is with burrowers getting under the wooden border, tempted to put some thin metal mesh wire buried around the edge about 6" or so.

Garden is about 12x20, expanding it to 12x30 this year.
Nice job on the garden enclosure.

I've heard you should avoid hay because it contains the tops of the grasses whereas straw is just the stalks. However, I have seen other blogs and sites touting the benefits of hay including delivering more nutrients back into the soil. I'd just as soon not add any more weed seeds to the area I'm trying to grow in.


Straw vs Hay - Which Makes a Better Mulch? - The Grow Network : The Grow Network
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