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Old 03-06-2017, 12:08 AM
 
240 posts, read 68,349 times
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I will! Just planted the bulbs so I guess it's wait and see time! Someone told me her lilies flourished despite being in a partial shade area so I hope I can replicate the experience. My balcony faces East but is open on three sides so it gets a constant breeze. Added some new containers over the weekend, starting with some hardy shade/partial shade plants to see which ones thrive. I'm testing some Vinca minor, Forget-me-nots, and lilyturf. It's the survival of the fittest, as they say.
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Old 03-11-2017, 02:13 AM
 
Location: On the Candy Eye Island
381 posts, read 91,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Basilide View Post
I'm going to try that this year. What kind of strawberries do you grow?

I have some wild strawberries from our summer castle and then 1 garden strawberry which I like. I also tried others but did not like their taste.

If you can play with 2+ years strawberries (winter between or not) that gives you more options but there is some good 1 year/monthly strawberries available too.

(I am not familiar with proper garden terms in English)
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Old 03-11-2017, 07:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellopity View Post
I will! Just planted the bulbs so I guess it's wait and see time! Someone told me her lilies flourished despite being in a partial shade area so I hope I can replicate the experience. My balcony faces East but is open on three sides so it gets a constant breeze. Added some new containers over the weekend, starting with some hardy shade/partial shade plants to see which ones thrive. I'm testing some Vinca minor, Forget-me-nots, and lilyturf. It's the survival of the fittest, as they say.
Sounds like a lot to start at once! The gardener's attitude is probably a good one to have in life... sow and see what comes, haha.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlowerDarling View Post
I have some wild strawberries from our summer castle and then 1 garden strawberry which I like. I also tried others but did not like their taste.

If you can play with 2+ years strawberries (winter between or not) that gives you more options but there is some good 1 year/monthly strawberries available too.

(I am not familiar with proper garden terms in English)
Wild strawberries are the alpine sort, I think : https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragaria_vesca

My seeds for Mignonette strawberries came in the mail today. They are supposed to be good for containers because they are small and don't trail. They are supposed to fruit in the first season, too. We'll see!
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Old 03-12-2017, 12:47 AM
 
Location: On the Candy Eye Island
381 posts, read 91,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Basilide View Post

Wild strawberries are the alpine sort, I think : https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragaria_vesca

My seeds for Mignonette strawberries came in the mail today. They are supposed to be good for containers because they are small and don't trail. They are supposed to fruit in the first season, too. We'll see!
Yes, wild strawberries are really yummy!

Best luck
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Old 03-12-2017, 04:41 PM
 
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Balconies are difficult environments to grow in. Think wind-swept cliffs and stunted twisted trees and scrub. I remember one trip I took to a remote hill where we arrived in a helicopter. We were walking on a thick carpet of scrubby, woody growth that clung to the soil. The naturalist identified the species and I was dumbfounded. Meleleuca, which I am familiar with in Florida gets to be a large tree, 50'-60' tall and 24"-36" diameter. Here on the windswept hill was only a foot tall.

I would recommend bonsai.
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Old 03-13-2017, 06:30 PM
 
240 posts, read 68,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Basilide View Post
Sounds like a lot to start at once! The gardener's attitude is probably a good one to have in life... sow and see what comes, haha.
Definitely my approach to the container garden project. We don't have a need for a landscaper/gardener anymore now that we've moved into a condo so I have been doing the balcony gardening all by myself. It's quite fun! And I got to incorporate turquoise into our home's color story by using a couple big turquoise planters in the balcony. The vinca minor is already blooming, will see how the other plants do... survival of the fittest!
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Old 03-15-2017, 03:47 PM
 
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What size pots? When I lived in zone 8--near 7b--I was afraid to put anything in small ones. The 9" pots had to be watered twice a day, but they got full sun.
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Old 03-15-2017, 05:19 PM
 
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Gerania, I have a few pots. One is a 10" round pot that I put in an 18" tall (about 12" diameter) turquoise planter (the smaller of the two turquoise planters). I put an inverted pot inside the turquoise container to elevate the pot and help aerate/drain. The soil in that one has been getting daily mists from the rain. I have a rectangular planter that holds three 10" cube pots. I haven't needed to water that one yet (again, rain). And finally I have an 18" tall turquoise container that is maybe 16" in diameter at the widest part. I used a planter insert in that one to decrease the amount of soil I use and help drain/aerate. With the planter insert I only needed to fill about 3/4 of the planter, and I used up a bag of potting soil (about 20-22 dry quarts).

The balcony is east facing and gets shade most of the day except for mornings. And we get a lot of drizzles. I'll include photos in case my description isn't clear (if I can get it to work):


The big turquoise planter (about 20-22 dry quarts of potting soil with planter insert)


The rectangular planter and smaller turquoise planter in the back

Last edited by hellopity; 03-15-2017 at 06:07 PM..
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Old 03-16-2017, 01:50 PM
 
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Keep in mind when plant guides say 'full sun' they generally mean six hours a day. A balcony with east and southern exposure will get more than that so you may need to invent some shade for them. Sun is food and energy so too much sun not only overheats the plants but also basically over stimulates them and they sort of die of exhaustion.

I had a southern-facing balcony in zone 7, and I kept my plants away from the railing, and instead closer to the building, so that the balcony above provided some shade. In the summer I watered twice a day and made sure the leaves got wet so that they had some protection from the heat.

I had a rubber plant that LOVED the hot humid summers. I kept it against the building and within only three years it was 7 feet tall and still going strong.
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Old 03-16-2017, 03:31 PM
 
240 posts, read 68,349 times
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MarianRavenwood, that is an excellent point and I will keep my eyes on the planters, especially the bigger turquoise one that is close to the rail. The upstairs balcony is providing some shade but it may not be adequate, especially in the summer with the long days. Thanks!
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