U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: What type of soil do you have most of?
Sandy 8 13.56%
Silty 3 5.08%
Clay 41 69.49%
Peaty 1 1.69%
Saline 0 0%
Loam 3 5.08%
Other - Please post below 3 5.08%
Voters: 59. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-04-2017, 04:42 AM
 
Location: SWCT, close to coast
57,590 posts, read 39,981,810 times
Reputation: 9028

Advertisements

Out of the 6 typical types of soil. Which do you have "most" of naturally without amending.


Sandy - Sandy soil has the largest particles among the different soil types. It’s dry and gritty to the touch, and because the particles have huge spaces between them, it can’t hold on to water.
Water drains rapidly, straight through to places where the roots, particularly those of seedlings, cannot reach. Plants don’t have a chance of using the nutrients in sandy soil more efficiently as they’re swiftly carried away by the runoff.
The upside to sandy soil is that it’s light to work with and warms much more quickly in the spring


Silty - Silty soil has much smaller particles than sandy soil so it’s smooth to the touch. When moistened, it’s soapy slick. When you roll it between your fingers, dirt is left on your skin.
Silty soil retains water longer, but it can’t hold on to as much nutrients as you’d want it to though it’s fairly fertile. Due to its moisture-retentive quality, silty soil is cold and drains poorly.
Silty soil can also easily compact, so avoid trampling on it when working your garden. It can become poorly aerated, too.


Clay - Clay soil has the smallest particles among the three so it has good water storage qualities. It’s sticky to the touch when wet, but smooth when dry.
Due to the tiny size of its particles and its tendency to settle together, little air passes through its spaces. Because it’s also slower to drain, it has a tighter hold on plant nutrients. Clay soil is thus rich in plant food for better growth


Peaty - Peaty soil is dark brown or black in color, soft, easily compressed due to its high water content, and rich in organic matter. Peat soil started forming over 9,000 years ago, with the rapid melting of glaciers. This rapid melt drowned plants quickly and died in the process. Their decay was so slow underwater that it led to the accumulation of organic area in a concentrated spot.


Loam - The type of soil that gardens and gardeners love is loamy soil. It contains a balance of all three soil materials—silt, sand and clay—plus humus. It has a higher pH and calcium levels because of its previous organic matter content.


Saline - The soil in extremely dry regions is usually brackish because of its high salt content. Known as saline soil, it can cause damage to and stall plant growth, impede germination, and cause difficulties in irrigation.


Which do you have mostly of?


Hopefully you have a general location on your header to give us an idea where you're located. (This can be done by clicking "My Settings" then first link on left "Edit Your Details" then scroll down)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-04-2017, 05:58 AM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
10,539 posts, read 5,903,688 times
Reputation: 2368
Clay
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 07:07 AM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
1,537 posts, read 646,115 times
Reputation: 1911
I would have to say, peaty.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Virginia
2,635 posts, read 1,045,538 times
Reputation: 6692
I've got beautiful loamy soil because my property was once part of a large farm until it was platted as a subdivision in 1922. When I was taking my gardening course we had to bring in a plastic bag of soil from our yards. Most of the class was from the adjoining county, which is known for red clay soils. They actually thought that my soil was "bought" garden soil.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Lake Grove
2,753 posts, read 1,483,716 times
Reputation: 4364
My soil is mostly clay. Considering the description above, does it need watering more often or less? I've had trouble planting trees because they seem to be starving of water, it never seems to seep below the surface. I have to plant trees by filling in the hole with top soil. Twice a year, I buy those miracle grow plant spikes and put them around. Last year I sprinkled ironite around them, hoping it would seep down eventually and help the evergreens. The lawn, watering a lot or a little, it looks wonderful in the cooler growing seasons, but in the heat it always looks terrible. I've had landscapers put down what they recommend, and I've put down Scotts and ironite and lime myself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 09:13 AM
 
Location: SWCT, close to coast
57,590 posts, read 39,981,810 times
Reputation: 9028
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zen88 View Post
My soil is mostly clay. Considering the description above, does it need watering more often or less?
Depends on scenario but I don't think you can base a more or less watering answer on the soil type alone. Do you get a lot of rains? downpours? Droughts? Ect.


In general Clay soils drain slow so that means if there isn't enough watering or rains happening, the moisture will evaporate before it can drain especially in hot weather.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 09:30 AM
 
6,490 posts, read 9,550,812 times
Reputation: 12104
We have sassafras soils, not sure where that fits in with those listed in the poll.

The Sassafras series consists of very deep, well drained, moderately permeable soils formed in sandy marine and old alluvial sediments of the Coastal Plain. These soils are categorized as prime farmland, which means that they are among the most productive soils in the state for agriculture and forestry, in addition to being one of the soils best suited to construction, onsite effluent disposal, and recreational development.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Long Neck , DE
4,787 posts, read 2,209,144 times
Reputation: 7595
Sandy
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 09:53 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
30,569 posts, read 38,145,111 times
Reputation: 49016
It's sandy but it has a layer of clay also. The natives call it "the gumbo". A lot of plants fail after a few years, when the roots hit the gumbo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
6,555 posts, read 8,236,179 times
Reputation: 5808
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdlr View Post
We have sassafras soils, not sure where that fits in with those listed in the poll.

The Sassafras series consists of very deep, well drained, moderately permeable soils formed in sandy marine and old alluvial sediments of the Coastal Plain. These soils are categorized as prime farmland, which means that they are among the most productive soils in the state for agriculture and forestry, in addition to being one of the soils best suited to construction, onsite effluent disposal, and recreational development.
No wonder those gardens look so good. Do you add sassafras soil to the containers too?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top