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Old 03-16-2017, 03:33 AM
 
Location: Wonderland, zn.8A
474 posts, read 107,471 times
Reputation: 418

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I think you have to be interested and really enjoy gardening to be a good gardener. Plants can tell when you don't like them. A large part of being a successful gardener is being intuitive about plants.
.
Perfect response "interested, Intuitive, enjoy Nurturing...love plants". Really this is all so true.
We who love Nature, enuf to Acknowledge just how very much Alive... plants are, will
chatter not merely at them, but actually communicate with plants, & they respond in kind: as 1 of countless other examples: last year, for my birthday around Thanksgiving, I asked 1 of my Lavender delphiniums "Please bloom 1 more time this year".
They bloom in summer, & mind you, this particular 1 had already done a repeat in Autumn, so it had well earned its annual rest when I made my request. - I kid you not, this gracious plant sent UP yet a 3rd. stalk two feet tall, & bloomed in full splendor...Thanksgiving week, bedecked in snow no less. You could see it physically shiver, but it was so beautiful... I hugged it, tears rolling down my face in so much gratitude... THANK YOU, I said over & over.

I hope you will Allow yourself to develop some interest like this. You will be soo very richly rewarded.
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Old 03-16-2017, 11:15 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
28,103 posts, read 35,072,454 times
Reputation: 44526
Think about the way a weed can find its way through the tiniest crack in concrete. Things that grow are unstoppable. If OP is acquiring an established garden, then you know those plants just need to be left alone, except for a bit of fertilizer and water.
Unless you try to force a plant into unnatural conditions, they will usually do fine.
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Old 03-16-2017, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Odenton, MD
176 posts, read 65,736 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eldemila View Post
I use to say I could kill silk. Seriously, the house I bought didn't have any foliage. I had a silk ficus tree that I stuck in the front of the house. I came back and it was lying on it's side. It was a joke, that I killed silk. I killed just about anything I tried to grow. It didn't help that I lived in hot, humid Miami either.


One of the reasons I chose this area was due to the seasons and the plants you could grow here in Zone 7b, unlike that of Miami, where most everything is just green (bougainvillea's excluded) I was lucky enough to meet someone on one of the garden websites that lived just a few miles away from where I was going to be living. What a gem, and what a find. She has a degree in plant science and was happy to share her love, and knowledge of plans and teach me everything I know now. Also, she's become a best friend as well. Basically, she's created a (plant) monster. I have put in over 1000 plants and bulbs in my 3/4 acre lot. It is now my job. Okay, it's gotten way bigger than I ever imagined, but I have to say, I love it, minus the weeds.


Find your zone, find what other people are able to grow in the neighborhood, find what plants are hard to kill, like daylilies if they grow in your area. Figure out what you may want, flowers, edibles, both?


If I can grow something, anyone can!!!!


Good luck
Somehow I don't think I'll ever quite get that enthusiastic, but I would like to have nice border plants around my house that I haven't somehow managed to kill. About the only thing I haven't killed is hostas, and all I did for those was pull out the dead stalk things every year.
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Old 03-16-2017, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Odenton, MD
176 posts, read 65,736 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
If you don't like gardening, don't worry about the color of your thumb. You can hire a landscaper to put in low-maintenance landscaping, with automatic sprinklers/drip irrigation on timers, and hire them to come back 1-2 times a year to do any needed maintenance. For those of us that do enjoy gardening, it does cost money on an ongoing basis, and take time. In my case, because I have 75 bonsai in addition to the houseplants, gardens and greenhouse, I am doing something related to plants every day.
75...oh my goodness...

I think hiring is probably in my future if we buy this house, which is my #2 house behind another that might get sold before we have a chance to get out there for our actual house hunting trip--heck, ,this one might, too, but it has more issues on the interior that other buyers might not be willing to overlook.
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Old 03-16-2017, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Odenton, MD
176 posts, read 65,736 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassybluesy View Post
I'm of the opinion that you CAN come up with a schedule, but it involves some research into the type of plants you have, and then finding out what the needs are for the plants...which is all easy enough to find out, via the internet...but if it's a complete drag for you...what's the point...right?
I was kind of hoping that scheduling would be...well, not simple, but at least like you described. Like if I could at least figure out what the heck each plant was and get some sort of spreadsheet going, I wouldn't feel nearly so lost. It's not necessarily that it's a drag. I just never really have any idea of what's out there or where to start--and well, yeah, weeding really sucks. Usually the plants around the houses we buy are either bushes that require no maintenance or things like hostas...amazingly enough, THOSE I haven't killed. I've killed bushes. I'm not even sure how. But hostas apparently can grow ANYWHERE.


Quote:
But if it were me, I'd at least wait until everything is blooming and growing. Who knows, you might have a garden full of low maintenance stuff that you don't even have to think about, like Hostas and bulbs. (Daffodils, iris, daylilies, stuff like that. They're incredibly low maintenance.
By the time we go do our house hunting, if this house is still on the market (and I hope it is because otherwise it's great) then the garden should be starting to show signs of life and maybe what is there. Then I guess I'll try to use the Internet to compare what I'm seeing to pictures online.

I think the thing that scares me with a big established garden is that I won't know what's a weed and what's not, and then I'll end up pulling up things that should have stayed in the ground and leaving the weeds. It makes me feel so overwhelmed. Hiring out the landscaping is probably best.
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Old 03-16-2017, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Odenton, MD
176 posts, read 65,736 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ncliving60 View Post
Sassy is right. Wait until you have an idea of the type of plantings you have and please know that your local County Extension Master Gardeners might be useful in helping you determine the needs of your garden. They are free!
I've never even heard of a County Extension Master Gardener. I'll have to look that up. Does every county in the U.S. really have that?
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Old 03-16-2017, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Odenton, MD
176 posts, read 65,736 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandpointian View Post
plant easy to maintain perennials. You will look like a genius. in the summer plant a few annuals and have them on a drip system. Again you will be the toast of your 'hood.

S.
I've tried perennials. I planted three lavender plants this last spring. One of them has survived...I think. I'm not sure if it'll actually bloom this spring. Right now it looks really gray.

About the only thing I haven't killed other than hostas is daylillies (I think that's what they're called).
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Old 03-17-2017, 09:59 AM
 
Location: British Columbia
3,594 posts, read 4,111,011 times
Reputation: 4470
Quote:
Originally Posted by merewenc View Post

.......... By the time we go do our house hunting, if this house is still on the market (and I hope it is because otherwise it's great) then the garden should be starting to show signs of life and maybe what is there. Then I guess I'll try to use the Internet to compare what I'm seeing to pictures online.

I think the thing that scares me with a big established garden is that I won't know what's a weed and what's not, and then I'll end up pulling up things that should have stayed in the ground and leaving the weeds. It makes me feel so overwhelmed. Hiring out the landscaping is probably best.
There's an easier solution to that - you take pictures of everything growing on the property and then start your own ID topic here in the garden forum and post all the plant pictures in that thread. There's more than enough knowledgeable gardeners on this forum that would be able to identify what you have growing, including ID'ing the weeds, plus provide some information about the plants' needs. That will save you from spending hours and hours of time searching through hundreds of images online trying to compare pictures, and once you have ID's from other posters you can look directly at information online (and ask here) about each specific type of plant.

.
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Old 03-18-2017, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,444 posts, read 4,425,306 times
Reputation: 2468
Quote:
Originally Posted by merewenc View Post
I've tried perennials. I planted three lavender plants this last spring. One of them has survived...I think. I'm not sure if it'll actually bloom this spring. Right now it looks really gray.

About the only thing I haven't killed other than hostas is daylillies (I think that's what they're called).
tulips, daffodils, crocuses--all bulbs
peonies, phlox/steppbables -- just as easy

you can do it!
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Old 03-18-2017, 08:41 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
28,103 posts, read 35,072,454 times
Reputation: 44526
Quote:
Originally Posted by merewenc View Post
I've never even heard of a County Extension Master Gardener. I'll have to look that up. Does every county in the U.S. really have that?
Not only that, but there are Master Gardeners courses taught at Botanical Gardens or Horticulture Societies, so either of these places can probable recommend someone.
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