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Old 03-12-2017, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Odenton, MD
142 posts, read 48,125 times
Reputation: 224

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Due to lack of interest and confusion on what exactly I'm supposed to do when, I've never been able to keep a plant alive for longer than a few months. Inside plants, little garden plots along the outside of the house, whatever, I kill it. I have over-watered, under-watered, over-fed, under-fed, all of it.

However, now we're contemplating buying a house that already has about 1/4 of the back yard dedicated to an established garden. Since all of the pictures for the listing are from earlier this month (maybe late last month), I can't tell if I even like the plants in there. But it's likely if we bought the place I would need to keep them alive for at least a little while until I can either hire someone to take care of it for me, task my older daughter to do it (she actually likes plants), or dig the whole thing up and maybe put down sod (if I find I just can't take it).

That being said, is there any way to actually get good at gardening when you don't even like it? Some kind of scheduling system or app? Maybe if I could just plug in the type of plants into a consolidated plan, I could do a better job at remembering what needs water when and how much, if any of them need plant food and when, and if I should prune or just leave it to nature and when to prune (am I even using the right word?) and all that stuff.
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Old 03-12-2017, 01:58 PM
 
Location: British Columbia
3,477 posts, read 3,993,980 times
Reputation: 4363
I think you have to be interested and really enjoy gardening to be a good gardener. Plants can tell when you don't like them. A large part of being a successful gardener is being intuitive about plants. If you aren't interested in them and not willing to devote a lot of time and effort to nurturing them perhaps your best bet would be to hire somebody with a green thumb to look after your yard plants.

.
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Old 03-12-2017, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
10,689 posts, read 3,949,417 times
Reputation: 5231
EVERY green thumb got that way by killing plants and learning the hard way.

Plants are living beings, and you can't care for them with "Some kind of scheduling system or app", anymore than you could care for your kids that way.

But I will say that if you hate gardening, you'll never have a green thumb yourself, so you'll have to hire it out.

If you feel this way about gardening, why buy a house with a yard? Wouldn't it be better to skip the whole issue and buy a townhouse? Because whether you do it yourself or hire it done, you are spending a noticeable part of your one and only life doing something you'd rather not.
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Old 03-12-2017, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Odenton, MD
142 posts, read 48,125 times
Reputation: 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
EVERY green thumb got that way by killing plants and learning the hard way.

Plants are living beings, and you can't care for them with "Some kind of scheduling system or app", anymore than you could care for your kids that way.

But I will say that if you hate gardening, you'll never have a green thumb yourself, so you'll have to hire it out.

If you feel this way about gardening, why buy a house with a yard? Wouldn't it be better to skip the whole issue and buy a townhouse? Because whether you do it yourself or hire it done, you are spending a noticeable part of your one and only life doing something you'd rather not.
Actually, kids thrive on schedules. I can monitor how much they're eating, ensure that they're getting the proper amount of liquids each day, set sleep schedules that optimize their energy, make sure they get so many active hours a day...it's worked for two so far, anyway, and we haven't stunted them so far as I can see!

We're doing the townhouse thing now in an area where that was the only affordable option for the amount of space we need. We're about to move again (back) to an area where the "norm" is SFHs on at least .15 acre but usually more. To be honest, we LOVE not sharing walls and having some space away from our neighbors, so this townhouse thing for the past four years and a bit more has been a little miserable. Plus we do neeed green space for the kids to run around, and in the neighborhoods with larger lots it seems like playgrounds are much more scarce. Everyone has playsets in the back yard instead. And my husband does the actual lawn work as far as mowing goes, but neither of us are great with the rest of the plant world. I don't see how not liking to surround myself with a jungle precludes having a large yard and no shared walls. Most of the houses we're looking at do NOT have such large gardens taking up a good percentage of the yard, but this one is otherwise pretty perfect for us in every other way.

It's looking like hiring out the gardening or just getting rid of the thing is going to be the best bet, then. Anyone have any idea how much it costs to pull up maybe a 20'X15' garden and put down sod?
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Old 03-12-2017, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Somewhere, out there in Zone7B
3,293 posts, read 4,342,843 times
Reputation: 2039
I use to say I could kill silk. Seriously, the house I bought didn't have any foliage. I had a silk ficus tree that I stuck in the front of the house. I came back and it was lying on it's side. It was a joke, that I killed silk. I killed just about anything I tried to grow. It didn't help that I lived in hot, humid Miami either.


One of the reasons I chose this area was due to the seasons and the plants you could grow here in Zone 7b, unlike that of Miami, where most everything is just green (bougainvillea's excluded) I was lucky enough to meet someone on one of the garden websites that lived just a few miles away from where I was going to be living. What a gem, and what a find. She has a degree in plant science and was happy to share her love, and knowledge of plans and teach me everything I know now. Also, she's become a best friend as well. Basically, she's created a (plant) monster. I have put in over 1000 plants and bulbs in my 3/4 acre lot. It is now my job. Okay, it's gotten way bigger than I ever imagined, but I have to say, I love it, minus the weeds.


Find your zone, find what other people are able to grow in the neighborhood, find what plants are hard to kill, like daylilies if they grow in your area. Figure out what you may want, flowers, edibles, both?


If I can grow something, anyone can!!!!


Good luck
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Old 03-15-2017, 08:30 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
23,631 posts, read 39,581,911 times
Reputation: 20442
If you don't like gardening, don't worry about the color of your thumb. You can hire a landscaper to put in low-maintenance landscaping, with automatic sprinklers/drip irrigation on timers, and hire them to come back 1-2 times a year to do any needed maintenance. For those of us that do enjoy gardening, it does cost money on an ongoing basis, and take time. In my case, because I have 75 bonsai in addition to the houseplants, gardens and greenhouse, I am doing something related to plants every day.
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Old 03-15-2017, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Somewhere, out there in Zone7B
3,293 posts, read 4,342,843 times
Reputation: 2039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
For those of us that do enjoy gardening, it does cost money on an ongoing basis, and take time. In my case, because I have 75 bonsai in addition to the houseplants, gardens and greenhouse, I am doing something related to plants every day.
Ditto, with the exceptions of the 75 bonsai! Then again, I have 60 butterfly bushes 60+ daylilys, more than that in bearded iris, and the list goes on.

If it's not the plants to tend to, it's the weeds to take care of IN the garden. Come summer, it's a whole much more with the veggie garden and the pests that come along with it.
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Old 03-15-2017, 03:39 PM
 
30 posts, read 4,570 times
Reputation: 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by merewenc View Post
Due to lack of interest and confusion on what exactly I'm supposed to do when, I've never been able to keep a plant alive for longer than a few months. Inside plants, little garden plots along the outside of the house, whatever, I kill it. I have over-watered, under-watered, over-fed, under-fed, all of it.

However, now we're contemplating buying a house that already has about 1/4 of the back yard dedicated to an established garden. Since all of the pictures for the listing are from earlier this month (maybe late last month), I can't tell if I even like the plants in there. But it's likely if we bought the place I would need to keep them alive for at least a little while until I can either hire someone to take care of it for me, task my older daughter to do it (she actually likes plants), or dig the whole thing up and maybe put down sod (if I find I just can't take it).

That being said, is there any way to actually get good at gardening when you don't even like it? Some kind of scheduling system or app? Maybe if I could just plug in the type of plants into a consolidated plan, I could do a better job at remembering what needs water when and how much, if any of them need plant food and when, and if I should prune or just leave it to nature and when to prune (am I even using the right word?) and all that stuff.

I'm of the opinion that you CAN come up with a schedule, but it involves some research into the type of plants you have, and then finding out what the needs are for the plants...which is all easy enough to find out, via the internet...but if it's a complete drag for you...what's the point...right?


But if it were me, I'd at least wait until everything is blooming and growing. Who knows, you might have a garden full of low maintenance stuff that you don't even have to think about, like Hostas and bulbs. (Daffodils, iris, daylilies, stuff like that. They're incredibly low maintenance.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:05 PM
 
57 posts, read 40,074 times
Reputation: 170
Sassy is right. Wait until you have an idea of the type of plantings you have and please know that your local County Extension Master Gardeners might be useful in helping you determine the needs of your garden. They are free!
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Old 03-15-2017, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,437 posts, read 4,371,466 times
Reputation: 2457
Quote:
Originally Posted by merewenc View Post
Due to lack of interest and confusion on what exactly I'm supposed to do when, I've never been able to keep a plant alive for longer than a few months. Inside plants, little garden plots along the outside of the house, whatever, I kill it. I have over-watered, under-watered, over-fed, under-fed, all of it.

However, now we're contemplating buying a house that already has about 1/4 of the back yard dedicated to an established garden. Since all of the pictures for the listing are from earlier this month (maybe late last month), I can't tell if I even like the plants in there. But it's likely if we bought the place I would need to keep them alive for at least a little while until I can either hire someone to take care of it for me, task my older daughter to do it (she actually likes plants), or dig the whole thing up and maybe put down sod (if I find I just can't take it).

That being said, is there any way to actually get good at gardening when you don't even like it? Some kind of scheduling system or app? Maybe if I could just plug in the type of plants into a consolidated plan, I could do a better job at remembering what needs water when and how much, if any of them need plant food and when, and if I should prune or just leave it to nature and when to prune (am I even using the right word?) and all that stuff.
plant easy to maintain perennials. You will look like a genius. in the summer plant a few annuals and have them on a drip system. Again you will be the toast of your 'hood.

S.
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