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Old 03-24-2017, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Niagara Region
986 posts, read 987,125 times
Reputation: 3086

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For the last 3 years I have always brought a couple of impatiens stems inside in October, before my annuals die. Just a few inches, rooted in fresh soil and fertilized regularly. This past Oct I did the same thing, but didn't get one flower or bud. Lovely healthy greenery, but that's it. The plant is bushy and about a foot tall, but not a single flower.

Same conditions every year - warm sun-room, no direct light, and 10-15-10 plant food.

The only difference is this current cutting came from last year's cutting which I took outside, and which grew into a massive plant and flowered all summer. Do you think that's a factor?
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Old 03-24-2017, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,046 posts, read 1,401,026 times
Reputation: 278
Try less nitrogen and significantly higher phosphorous.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Vectoris View Post
For the last 3 years I have always brought a couple of impatiens stems inside in October, before my annuals die. Just a few inches, rooted in fresh soil and fertilized regularly. This past Oct I did the same thing, but didn't get one flower or bud. Lovely healthy greenery, but that's it. The plant is bushy and about a foot tall, but not a single flower.

Same conditions every year - warm sun-room, no direct light, and 10-15-10 plant food.

The only difference is this current cutting came from last year's cutting which I took outside, and which grew into a massive plant and flowered all summer. Do you think that's a factor?
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Old 03-26-2017, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Niagara Region
986 posts, read 987,125 times
Reputation: 3086
Quote:
Originally Posted by movin2Reston View Post
Try less nitrogen and significantly higher phosphorous.
Thanks, I'll certainly try that. From a scientific perspective, though, any idea why I suddenly need to change that ratio of NPK, and why it's worked before? I'm trying to figure out what the changing factors are.
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Old 03-26-2017, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,046 posts, read 1,401,026 times
Reputation: 278
That is hard to say, but things can change over time.

Try my suggestion and keep us posted.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Vectoris View Post
Thanks, I'll certainly try that. From a scientific perspective, though, any idea why I suddenly need to change that ratio of NPK, and why it's worked before? I'm trying to figure out what the changing factors are.
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Old 03-27-2017, 12:09 AM
 
Location: British Columbia
3,561 posts, read 4,081,525 times
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What kind of impatiens is it?

You are discussing a 3rd generation clone which just might possibly be a 4th generation clone. Do you know the history of the original grandmother plant - was the first clone you made taken from a commercially grown grandmother plant that was grown from seed or was the grandmother plant also a clone?

If you have made a clone from a clone from a clone that might be a problem as each successive generation of clones changes characteristics and strengths of the plants. Repeated cloning eventually weakens plants and those weaknesses (such as delayed or no blooming, or becoming exceedingly spindly, or susceptibility to more diseases/infections) can start showing up in the 3rd and 4th generations of clones reverting back to wild type.

I'm not saying that definitely is what is happening with your plant, just that it's a possibility and it would be good if you knew the propogation history of the original ancestor plant.

As a general rule of thumb I will never make clones from clones, I'll only make clones from strong plants that were grown from seed.

.
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Old 03-27-2017, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Niagara Region
986 posts, read 987,125 times
Reputation: 3086
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
What kind of impatiens is it?

You are discussing a 3rd generation clone which just might possibly be a 4th generation clone. Do you know the history of the original grandmother plant - was the first clone you made taken from a commercially grown grandmother plant that was grown from seed or was the grandmother plant also a clone?

If you have made a clone from a clone from a clone that might be a problem as each successive generation of clones changes characteristics and strengths of the plants. Repeated cloning eventually weakens plants and those weaknesses (such as delayed or no blooming, or becoming exceedingly spindly, or susceptibility to more diseases/infections) can start showing up in the 3rd and 4th generations of clones reverting back to wild type.

I'm not saying that definitely is what is happening with your plant, just that it's a possibility and it would be good if you knew the propogation history of the original ancestor plant.

As a general rule of thumb I will never make clones from clones, I'll only make clones from strong plants that were grown from seed.

.
I'm thinking you may be right, and the final clone was too weak. Last year's cutting had come from a friend's plant and it was just one of those hanging bags, commercially grown, and ever-flowering, probably from Home Depot's garden centre. I guess I can't complain I got two flowering seasons out of it, and one being winter was extra special.
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Old Yesterday, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Niagara Region
986 posts, read 987,125 times
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All five stems are now covered in buds! And I haven't made any changes. A nice head start to the flowering season
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Old Yesterday, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
5,801 posts, read 7,285,462 times
Reputation: 4874
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vectoris View Post
All five stems are now covered in buds! And I haven't made any changes. A nice head start to the flowering season
#1 Rule of gardening is patience. We all need to learn that.
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Old Yesterday, 08:24 PM
 
Location: British Columbia
3,561 posts, read 4,081,525 times
Reputation: 4440
Congratulations!


.
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Old Yesterday, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Niagara Region
986 posts, read 987,125 times
Reputation: 3086
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuts2uiam View Post
#1 Rule of gardening is patience. We all need to learn that.
Indeed! Who am I to say whether the buds are early, late or on time?
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