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Old 03-29-2017, 09:25 AM
 
Location: NC
648 posts, read 923,400 times
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what y'all think about this idea ? Pros & cons ?

I think this is a one time investment and retails water longer, good for your back since it is almost 3 ft above the ground.

Concrete Raised Garden Beds (Easy to build, and fairly cheap) - Vegetable Gardener
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Old 03-30-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,721 posts, read 47,472,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nc99 View Post
what y'all think about this idea ? Pros & cons ?

I think this is a one time investment and retails water longer, good for your back since it is almost 3 ft above the ground.
Our beds are only one layer high [8"]. They are mostly 8' long and 4' wide. I do not mind kneeling [on pads] next to a bed to weed it.

Regardless of the exact height, you will need to lean out over the bed. Which is where it WILL hurt your back.

My Dw and I are both 5'10" tall. We need our counter-tops to be between 36" and 38" tall. So we can work without back pain. This is a non-standard counter-top height. Depending on your height, you will need a work area set at a different height, if you are to avoid back pain.

This is hard to do with gardening. Because you need to avoid leaning out over the bed. To keep your back straight you can only reach out about 18". The blocks themselves are 6" wide, so that only gives you 12" wide swath to garden in while avoiding leaning.

We have had a raised bed one time where the soil inside was 3' deep. That is a huge amount of soil. Few crops need any more than 8" of soil.



Raised beds do not retain water.
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Old 03-30-2017, 11:43 AM
Status: "I cannot wait for the heat to break..." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,368 posts, read 25,483,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nc99 View Post
what y'all think about this idea ? Pros & cons ?

I think this is a one time investment and retails water longer, good for your back since it is almost 3 ft above the ground.

Concrete Raised Garden Beds (Easy to build, and fairly cheap) - Vegetable Gardener

I think they will last longer than wood.

As for backs. I think 3 feet high could be worse. I do better when I can kneel on the ground and reach across or have something just above waist height. If I was you I would test different heights. You can use buckets, ladder rungs etc. and put cardboard or a piece of wood across. Now lean across and pretend to work. If 3 feet feels good then don't worry about anyone else

If you don't line the bed it will retain water better.
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Old 03-30-2017, 12:15 PM
 
Location: NC
648 posts, read 923,400 times
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I plan to do 10'x4'x16'' (LxWxH). Plan to do 2 rows of plants in the bed.

From Top to bottom, plan to add 4'' straw + 5 '' garden soil + 4'' straws so it will retain water. Wondering with the heavy concrete blocks one on top of another, not much space for water drain, will it just get filled up in the bed ? Too much water is also not good ?!
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Old 03-30-2017, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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I'm not a short person but I found that 4 foot wide raised beds is still a bit too wide and reducing them to 3 feet is much easier to reach into the middle parts. But for the sake of design, minimizing material waste and efficient use of garden space, 4 feet is a good width as well.
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:24 AM
 
Location: NC
648 posts, read 923,400 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
I'm not a short person but I found that 4 foot wide raised beds is still a bit too wide and reducing them to 3 feet is much easier to reach into the middle parts. But for the sake of design, minimizing material waste and efficient use of garden space, 4 feet is a good width as well.
the bed is accessible from both sides...
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Old 04-03-2017, 06:13 AM
 
857 posts, read 642,065 times
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I use concrete and am happy with it. A couple of suggestions for you. Run a drip line through the bed before You fill it with dirt. It's nice to be able to hook it up to the hose then go run some errands then come back and turn it off. You'll save water and have less moisture related diseases as well. Also, don't cap the small squares. These spots are perfect for marigolds and herbs.
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Old 04-04-2017, 06:58 AM
 
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Be aware of soil pH issues, especially at first. Don't expect these to last a long time because of the lack of proper footings, at least if you live up north. If you don't have a truck, your costs will be higher, since the blocks are bulky and heavy, not to mention getting enough fill.
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Old 04-04-2017, 09:34 AM
 
857 posts, read 642,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
Be aware of soil pH issues, especially at first. Don't expect these to last a long time because of the lack of proper footings, at least if you live up north. If you don't have a truck, your costs will be higher, since the blocks are bulky and heavy, not to mention getting enough fill.

I've never had an issue with pH. My soil tends to stay on the acidic side so the leaching from the concrete is probably a good thing. Also, the OP is in NC. They won't move anywhere. Just wait until the soil is good and saturated then push them down into the red clay. Stomp on one side or the other to level them.
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Old 04-04-2017, 09:37 AM
 
857 posts, read 642,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
Don't expect these to last a long time because of the lack of proper footings, at least if you live up north. If you don't have a truck, your costs will be higher, since the blocks are bulky and heavy
The OP is in NC. All they need to keep the blocks in place is to wait until the soil is nice and saturated then press the blocks into the clay. Also, the blocks aren't that big and bulky. You can easily fit 10 in a small car. That's only a few trips back and forth to the store to get a bed the size the poster is interested in.
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