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Old 04-17-2017, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Virginia
191 posts, read 124,031 times
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Trying to determine the problem with one of my Daisy Gardenia?
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Under or over watered?-img_5116.jpg  
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Old 04-17-2017, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
36,555 posts, read 38,630,310 times
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Looks to be overwatered creating fungus rust spots.
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Old 04-17-2017, 02:55 PM
 
4,857 posts, read 5,111,434 times
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Rickin, I think I saw a post where you said you moved to VA recently. VA can be a whole other things as far as gardening. I've spent some time there and had to amend amend amend. A lot of it is clay soil. If you see a field tilled...sort of orange soil. Very different if you're used to dark NY soil. You might look into gardening classes, maybe taught by garden centers or maybe Master Gardener classes.

Your gardenia. Va has had such crazy weather this year. Sudden hot hot days and then along come freezing nights and near freezing days. There is not a whole lot of spring, especially as you go further south in Va. But when it comes it is glorious. This year pix I hoped to take of flowering trees I really couldn't because the hot weather had made the trees bloom out and turn green even a couple of weeks before I arrived. Although the dogwoods are still splendid.

All the best.
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Old 04-17-2017, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Virginia
191 posts, read 124,031 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by cully View Post
Rickin, I think I saw a post where you said you moved to VA recently. VA can be a whole other things as far as gardening. I've spent some time there and had to amend amend amend. A lot of it is clay soil. If you see a field tilled...sort of orange soil. Very different if you're used to dark NY soil. You might look into gardening classes, maybe taught by garden centers or maybe Master Gardener classes.

Your gardenia. Va has had such crazy weather this year. Sudden hot hot days and then along come freezing nights and near freezing days. There is not a whole lot of spring, especially as you go further south in Va. But when it comes it is glorious. This year pix I hoped to take of flowering trees I really couldn't because the hot weather had made the trees bloom out and turn green even a couple of weeks before I arrived. Although the dogwoods are still splendid.

All the best.
You are exactly correct, I was familiar with NY soil, lived there my whole life and here in Virginia the soil is very different. I did however, speak with many professions at Nurseries and garden centers as well as had some trees planted by professions and had conversations with them as well.

The majority of the so called "professions" advise against amending the soil because they have found the roots will grow only in the conditioned soil and not extend into the clay. I condition the soil to a lesser degree while providing a really large planting area while keeping the root ball slightly high and then mulch. Every piece I have planted "so far" is living. My biggest issue/ unknown is when to water??? Currently, I just poke a small area to a depth of 6 inches and look to see if the soil is wet or not and use that as to water or not. I really wish I had a better feel for this.

Please feel free to comment at your convenience! Thanks
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Old 04-17-2017, 10:50 PM
 
4,857 posts, read 5,111,434 times
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That's a good idea.

My favorite house in Va was one where the landscaping was well cared for by an avid gardener former owner. Terrific ornamentals in the back yard. They had amended the clay somewhat. They did this along one side and in a small bed.

Then there was the grass that grew well in the back with a landscaping area behind and in front of it that had nothing. Realized the clay soil acted like a vase. Since so much else was worked, I started on some more and just kept going.

A guy from the country who was helping with something going on high up in the trees asked if we'd like some good soil from the nearby country as well as some good mulch. Sure. Fabulous mixture which included a few old cow paddies. Added to it and mixed it up. End result was a long bed of the largest roses beyond what I expected. And the other was a few large rocks I found dug up during new construction among some beautiful perrenials. Thing is I had wound up digging out a lot of the remaining yard, going down very deep too. It wasn't enormous and I just went with the flow because I so enjoyed it.

Happy gardening.
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Old 04-18-2017, 12:37 AM
 
Location: British Columbia
3,698 posts, read 4,211,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickcin View Post
You are exactly correct, I was familiar with NY soil, lived there my whole life and here in Virginia the soil is very different. I did however, speak with many professions at Nurseries and garden centers as well as had some trees planted by professions and had conversations with them as well.

The majority of the so called "professions" advise against amending the soil because they have found the roots will grow only in the conditioned soil and not extend into the clay. I condition the soil to a lesser degree while providing a really large planting area while keeping the root ball slightly high and then mulch. Every piece I have planted "so far" is living. My biggest issue/ unknown is when to water??? Currently, I just poke a small area to a depth of 6 inches and look to see if the soil is wet or not and use that as to water or not. I really wish I had a better feel for this.

Please feel free to comment at your convenience! Thanks

Get yourself a simple moisture meter that you stick in the soil - they are not expensive (around $10) and you will thank yourself non-stop and so will your plants. I use one like the green ones with a single long prong shown here https://www.google.ca/search?q=soil+...3mGxM:&spf=208 but you will see some of them have a second prong for measuring the pH of the soil and some of them also have a light sensor. You'll also see some of them are very sophisticated and a little too technical for ordinary gardening around the home.

A moisture meter can be so helpful to use with all of your plants, including houseplants and plants outdoors in containers and in raised beds. Some parts of my garden the drainage or water retention can differ so much from one location to another that in one spot the soil is too dry and only 8 - 12 inches away from it the soil might be saturated. The moisture meter lets me know exactly where spots get too dry or too wet and I can spot water exactly only where needed.

After awhile you will become familiar enough with the characteristics of your soil in all locations around your yard so that you will no longer need to rely on tools like moisture meters and soil analysis kits to determine what plants and soil needs and when they need it. But in the meantime indulge yourself with all the helpful tools that you can get to help you get to that level of familiarity and expertise with your new gardens.


.
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Old 04-18-2017, 04:02 AM
 
Location: Virginia
191 posts, read 124,031 times
Reputation: 62
Zoisite

I have the exact meter that you have identified in your post and bought it years ago for house plants. I guess it could help with the exterior trees, however they are much larger than house plants so I might need to dig a bit in order to get the probe a little deeper. My new plNtings include several Laurels, a Paper Bark Maple, Oakland Hollys and a Japanese Coral Bark Maple.

The soil varies from different locations on our 1/2 acre lot. The shrub/landscaped planter against the front of the house is solid, wet, red clay but all of the plants are living?
The rear and west side yards are a looser, dryer clay with forest type topsoil on the surface. Just like fully has mentioned, the soil varies and is do to the point xcavation and backfill work when the house was built.

I am sure I will eventually get a good feel for the watering routine, eventually, but it could be an expensive lesson if I lose some planting along the way!
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