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Old 05-13-2017, 01:13 PM
 
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There is some ivy that is climbing up my locust tree; it's about 4 feet up the trunk at this point. Not poison ivy; I believe it is English ivy. My tree guy told me if I let it continue, it will kill the tree. My plan is to cut the vines near the base of the tree so that the vines already on the tree die. But what can I put on the plants and/or roots so that they don't come back?
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Old 05-13-2017, 01:24 PM
 
Location: NC
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They will come back, just keep cutting a couple times a year. Or rip out all the ivy within 20 ft.
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Old 05-13-2017, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Tordon. Use only as directed.
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Old 05-13-2017, 09:09 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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I had a similar problem. Cutting it at the base will help, but also pull off what you can or it leaves ugly dead vines. I was able to kill mine using Roundup. You just have to use it on a hot day, and hit the tender young leaves near the ends, which will absorb it much better than the waxy older leaves. Another method is to cut the ends off and poke them into a bottle with 1" of Roundup, making sure the cut ends are touching it. You will have to repeat for 2-3 years to get it all, since the branches that hit the ground root, so you may actually have 100 or more separate vines.
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Old 05-13-2017, 09:51 PM
 
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Thank you, and rep points to all! I appreciate all the advice. Here's hoping I can get rid of that dang ivy!
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Old 05-14-2017, 10:59 AM
 
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I have a live oak that was covered in English Ivy. I cut it all off at the base and let the vine dry on the tree and pulled it off later. Some ivy starts came up again and I kept pulling them out and now it seems to be done after two years. The regrowth wasn't as bad or tenacious as I expected.
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Old 05-14-2017, 07:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
I have a live oak that was covered in English Ivy. I cut it all off at the base and let the vine dry on the tree and pulled it off later. Some ivy starts came up again and I kept pulling them out and now it seems to be done after two years. The regrowth wasn't as bad or tenacious as I expected.
I think the ivy in my yard is bent on world conquest! It started in one corner of my back yard and now is about 1/3 of the way across the yard on one side.
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Old 05-14-2017, 10:18 PM
 
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It is. It wants to crawl into your house and strangle you in your sleep. It's a total beast to get rid of. It took me three years to get rid of it.

How? I dug it up with a garden fork. I'd read and read about chemicals, this and that. At the end of the day, it's just another plant that wants sun and water.

I ate my one radish today, and the spinach doesn't look very good. The groundhog likes the radish greens and the squirrels keep digging up the spinach. So much for living off the land.
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Old 05-15-2017, 04:38 AM
B87
 
Location: SW London
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Ivy is not parasitic and won't actually harm the tree. It gets nutrients from roots in the soil, while it uses small roots that anchor into the bark for support only.
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Old 05-15-2017, 08:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Ivy is not parasitic and won't actually harm the tree. It gets nutrients from roots in the soil, while it uses small roots that anchor into the bark for support only.
The guy who owns the company that took down a bunch of pine trees for us in December told me that he sees plenty of dead trees due to ivy. I was shocked at how deeply the vines had embedded themselves in the bark of the tree. Maybe that's how they do their damage?
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