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Old 07-27-2017, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
134,228 posts, read 70,131,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
I've never heard of spraying copper except as a dormant spray (where it works rather well). There is a very good anti-fungal spray for trees in leaf, which my mind has gone blank on the name of it. Please read the directions to make sure it is OK to use your spray in the summer.
i have. Are you thinking of Neem oil? Never used it but have seen it. I know a disease control regime must be bee friendly. Plans are underway for a small bee colony for a hobby that will also aid the few wild bees in pollination of the orchard and large vegetable garden.
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Old 07-27-2017, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
10,301 posts, read 8,584,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
i have. Are you thinking of Neem oil? Never used it but have seen it. I know a disease control regime must be bee friendly. Plans are underway for a small bee colony for a hobby that will also aid the few wild bees in pollination of the orchard and large vegetable garden.
At the end of last year I thought I lost my apples and pears to the blight. I have nine trees that are almost 40 years old. There was barely a leaf left and it was well before the frost and the surrounding trees loosing their leaves. I was sure that the blight had infected all my trees and there was no hope except to get out the chainsaw - then to plant new blight resistant varieties.

However, this year; they came back strong and have plentiful fruit! As a matter of fact I did not even spray them because I had given up last year. Currently they are again starting to show signs of the blight and I am again pruning off the dead. Again it looks like a losing battle; but not as bad as last year so far.

Here are a few thoughts I have entertained: One, possibly just wishful thinking: Is if my trees are infected and survive; will they develop immunities to the disease? The second thought is more sinister: Everybody wants us to clean our saws and trimmers with bleach in between cuts; but squirrels and other animals/birds constantly climb or land on our trees - don't they spread the blight?
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Old 07-27-2017, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
134,228 posts, read 70,131,730 times
Reputation: 121566
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
At the end of last year I thought I lost my apples and pears to the blight. I have nine trees that are almost 40 years old. There was barely a leaf left and it was well before the frost and the surrounding trees loosing their leaves. I was sure that the blight had infected all my trees and there was no hope except to get out the chainsaw - then to plant new blight resistant varieties.

However, this year; they came back strong and have plentiful fruit! As a matter of fact I did not even spray them because I had given up last year. Currently they are again starting to show signs of the blight and I am again pruning off the dead. Again it looks like a losing battle; but not as bad as last year so far.

Here are a few thoughts I have entertained: One, possibly just wishful thinking: Is if my trees are infected and survive; will they develop immunities to the disease? The second thought is more sinister: Everybody wants us to clean our saws and trimmers with bleach in between cuts; but squirrels and other animals/birds constantly climb or land on our trees - don't they spread the blight?
They might spread it the same as insects can. I never thought about it. Our trees were all planted this spring and the squirrels still prefer the oak and pine woods out back.
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Old 07-27-2017, 01:59 PM
 
303 posts, read 93,903 times
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Exclamation Fire Blight.....

I noticed Fire Blight was mentioned more than one time. What can control Fire Blight, or cure it? Because I have it on my Peonies, and other flower plants. Thank you,
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Old 07-27-2017, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
10,301 posts, read 8,584,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
They might spread it the same as insects can. I never thought about it. Our trees were all planted this spring and the squirrels still prefer the oak and pine woods out back.
They prefer the oaks and pines until the fruit ripens! Then everybody prefers the apples and pears. Right now my pears are not mature but our deer will stand on their hind legs to reach every one they can.

Twenty years ago we lost four peach trees to maybe the blight? I had not even heard about it back then. Many animals and birds also loved our peaches. The crows were a pain since they are such a large bird they would knock many off as they went after just one - I think they worked in cahoots with the deer!
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Old 07-27-2017, 06:14 PM
 
9,248 posts, read 3,702,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sollaces View Post
Is it true to get better fruit production to thin back your tree? I have an apricot tree that doesn't fruit. I started it at last 8 years ago from a small store bought tiny thing and now it's over 5' and growing strong. I've fertilized it but not regularly. Is the next step trimming it back to encourage fruit?
I have fruit 2 years in a row, not many but 3-4 every year. But this tree is only 3 years old since I bought it. I do summer trim and prune every year to maintain a small tree for my small yard.
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Old 07-28-2017, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
134,228 posts, read 70,131,730 times
Reputation: 121566
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
They prefer the oaks and pines until the fruit ripens! Then everybody prefers the apples and pears. Right now my pears are not mature but our deer will stand on their hind legs to reach every one they can.

Twenty years ago we lost four peach trees to maybe the blight? I had not even heard about it back then. Many animals and birds also loved our peaches. The crows were a pain since they are such a large bird they would knock many off as they went after just one - I think they worked in cahoots with the deer!
We live near main street downtown and thought this would not have deer problems but... We've a doe with twin fawns that thinks we are her landlord. She's been ran off over and over again about one bad habit. She loves on of the plum trees. Now that I spray with a deer repellant she has not been caught back. Finally the apple trees have had a chance to put on some top growth. I've got the goods on her. As for protecting the fruit I hope to have a chain link fence up with an extended 4' of electric fence during the fruiting season. One local told me to rid the dear of making or place a pit stop is to hot wire a glob of peanut butter and when the doe licks it she will flee. I was given this site for deer and bird netting for protecting fruit. Not sure it will work.


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Old 07-28-2017, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
10,301 posts, read 8,584,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
We live near main street downtown and thought this would not have deer problems but... We've a doe with twin fawns that thinks we are her landlord. She's been ran off over and over again about one bad habit. She loves on of the plum trees. Now that I spray with a deer repellant she has not been caught back. Finally the apple trees have had a chance to put on some top growth. I've got the goods on her. As for protecting the fruit I hope to have a chain link fence up with an extended 4' of electric fence during the fruiting season. One local told me to rid the dear of making or place a pit stop is to hot wire a glob of peanut butter and when the doe licks it she will flee. I was given this site for deer and bird netting for protecting fruit. Not sure it will work.

Here is a link for some fairly cheap deer netting from Lowes: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Sta-Green-C...Cloth/50119481. You can buy some treated 2X4X8's and rip them in half and point them; then drive them into the ground. Just use a stapler to secure the netting. Since it is cheap; it will not last forever - but can be cheaply replaced when needed.

The big problem with the deer repellents is that they wash off. If you have a lot of rain; you will need to re-spray. Deer operate 24/7 and humans forget; deer don't forget - they have to eat. Deer are also one of the biggest problems with 'dwarf' variety fruit trees - they can and will stand on their hind legs. That means that they can reach fruit as high as people can reach.

From the picture those fruit trees look very small. Your doe had a fawn because a buck was also in your area. Buck will destroy small trees, like yours, while rubbing the velvet off their horns. One more good reason to get up some kind of protective barrier.
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Old 07-29-2017, 02:54 AM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
134,228 posts, read 70,131,730 times
Reputation: 121566
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Here is a link for some fairly cheap deer netting from Lowes: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Sta-Green-C...Cloth/50119481. You can buy some treated 2X4X8's and rip them in half and point them; then drive them into the ground. Just use a stapler to secure the netting. Since it is cheap; it will not last forever - but can be cheaply replaced when needed.

The big problem with the deer repellents is that they wash off. If you have a lot of rain; you will need to re-spray. Deer operate 24/7 and humans forget; deer don't forget - they have to eat. Deer are also one of the biggest problems with 'dwarf' variety fruit trees - they can and will stand on their hind legs. That means that they can reach fruit as high as people can reach.

From the picture those fruit trees look very small. Your doe had a fawn because a buck was also in your area. Buck will destroy small trees, like yours, while rubbing the velvet off their horns. One more good reason to get up some kind of protective barrier.
I've been spraying most everyday rain or no rain. A few days back I bought a roll of field fence and am making cages supported by steel posts. There is a 6 point buck that has been seen once. Yes the trees are young planted mostly as dry root this last spring. I like the idea of the two x fours with netting. The trick will be to drive them into the ground with so many rocks below the surface. The same 2x4's could be used to take down a frost blanket if a late cold front threatens at the blooming stage I hope. After an all day rain yesterday spraying repellant first thing at daylight will be necessary. Deer may move on as the land behind me they pass through will have house built this summer that might cause them to move into a much larger wooded area nearby. That might just be wishful thinking as before I started spraying repellant they came while new houses were being built 2 lots down with active construction. I'll be in Lowes today and will check on their netting. I may have to drive large diameter rebar into the ground and use U-clamps to support the wood. That would give me a full 8' of netting. Most of my trees are dwarf or semi-dwarf so from your input I can expect the worst. So it's survive this winter and build a chain link fence minimum with a 4' extension on the top with stranded electric fence. Small animals as well as deer fenced out and birds kept off at fruiting with netting. Since the green beans started bearing in the garden they have drawn the deer to them and tree grazing stopped.
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
10,301 posts, read 8,584,224 times
Reputation: 6704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
I've been spraying most everyday rain or no rain. A few days back I bought a roll of field fence and am making cages supported by steel posts. There is a 6 point buck that has been seen once. Yes the trees are young planted mostly as dry root this last spring. I like the idea of the two x fours with netting. The trick will be to drive them into the ground with so many rocks below the surface. The same 2x4's could be used to take down a frost blanket if a late cold front threatens at the blooming stage I hope. After an all day rain yesterday spraying repellant first thing at daylight will be necessary. Deer may move on as the land behind me they pass through will have house built this summer that might cause them to move into a much larger wooded area nearby. That might just be wishful thinking as before I started spraying repellant they came while new houses were being built 2 lots down with active construction. I'll be in Lowes today and will check on their netting. I may have to drive large diameter rebar into the ground and use U-clamps to support the wood. That would give me a full 8' of netting. Most of my trees are dwarf or semi-dwarf so from your input I can expect the worst. So it's survive this winter and build a chain link fence minimum with a 4' extension on the top with stranded electric fence. Small animals as well as deer fenced out and birds kept off at fruiting with netting. Since the green beans started bearing in the garden they have drawn the deer to them and tree grazing stopped.
I just wanted to say good luck with your gardening! Green beans attract not only deer; but also groundhogs. Ground hogs will climb trees for apples. However, a few slices of apples in a Havahart trap is usually their downfall. Hopefully you do not have groundhogs in Tennessee?

I don't think you have to worry about getting the full eight foot to protect your trees. Deer have been known to jump considerably higher fences. I just Googled "How high can a deer jump over a fence?" and ended up with this answer: "In fact, the average white tail can jump over an obstacle that is not 5, 7, or 8 feet high but 12 or more feet high– taller than virtually any barrier deer fence. In fact, to the astonishment of deer control experts, the U.S. Department of Agriculture rates white tail deer as being able to jump 15 feet high."

But that said; deer do not like to jump high over short fences into small contained areas. An example of this would be one eight foot diameter, four foot high fence, around our rhododendrons. But I could not guarantee that they would not jump in if the circle was 12 feet in diameter.

At one time we could count about 75 deer around our property on any given day. Fortunately that number has diminished over years to about 6 to 12. On the other hand I sometimes feel that this smaller crowd does more damage than the old large crowds did! Deer are a little like pigs; if you raise one pig they are finicky eaters. But if you raise two pigs; they eat everything. The idea is that one will see the other one even sniff a new vegetable and then they think they are missing out on something.

We went from one 40' by 50' garden with a four foot high fence to now having raised beds surrounded on all sides by chicken wire. It just was not worth the time and money fighting a loosing battle. But we are also getting older.
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