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Old 07-29-2017, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
134,115 posts, read 69,441,792 times
Reputation: 121307

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Deer sniffed the apple trees last night but not a leaf touched. Enough of the multiple coats of repellent must have been enough to protect them. Following their tracks they went into a block of Zipper Cream cow peas and completely destroyed them. No real fruit to protect for two or more years and hopefully there will be a remedy found by then. It appears they follow a wooded stream from the large wildlife areas right into town. Can't help but wonder if a pellet gun to the hind quarter would sting bad enough they would remember and stay away. Need one for ground hogs. I've not seen them but next door neighbor has. Lots of them. With a forecast of no rain l will spray repellent on all vegetables and trees this afternoon.
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:40 AM
 
8,842 posts, read 3,371,543 times
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I have a few apple trees espaliered around my garden wall. I had some tasty Golden Dorsett apples. I bought the trees on sales from a Home Deport at 50% discount. But the small mouse here and there tends to get them first. Half of my crop was gone this year.
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Old 07-29-2017, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
9,718 posts, read 8,267,143 times
Reputation: 6180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Deer sniffed the apple trees last night but not a leaf touched. Enough of the multiple coats of repellent must have been enough to protect them. Following their tracks they went into a block of Zipper Cream cow peas and completely destroyed them. No real fruit to protect for two or more years and hopefully there will be a remedy found by then. It appears they follow a wooded stream from the large wildlife areas right into town. Can't help but wonder if a pellet gun to the hind quarter would sting bad enough they would remember and stay away. Need one for ground hogs. I've not seen them but next door neighbor has. Lots of them. With a forecast of no rain l will spray repellent on all vegetables and trees this afternoon.
I used to take out a slingshot and hit the one doe in the butt when she was in my garden. She would jump out and look at me as if saying: Ok; when are you going to leave! As soon as I left she would jump right back in! You cannot patrol 24/7; you are fighting a loosing battle. I don't mean to discourage you; but I don't like to see people waste their money. I love the taste of fresh tomatoes out of the garden. But I know, that if I plant outside my garden cages; I will never enjoy even one tomato - deer also love tomato plants and some even eat tomatoes. Our domesticated ducks also love tomatoes and my wife loves to spoil them - I was thinking about building a cage around my wife; but I do not think I would get away with it!

By the way; we have one public firing range not too far from my house and I have watched deer peacefully graze downrange while the range was in use!
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Old 07-29-2017, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
134,115 posts, read 69,441,792 times
Reputation: 121307
I hate to lose space to a New Zealand type fence. Tall fence - short fence combination that messes with their head. There must be a way to spook them with sounds using a timer. 24/7 is not possible and I'm not mean enough to gut shoot them with a bow. The beans that had been sprayed were not bothered again last night. My wife found a place in the middle of a tall Lima bean patch that looks like a fawn took a nap in it. One solution is a chain link fence with a pit bull maybe.
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Old 07-31-2017, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
134,115 posts, read 69,441,792 times
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I learned a lesson the hard way. Bought a hose end sprayer to make it quick and easy to spray deer repellent across the fruit trees and grapevines as well as a bean crop between first year trees. So far it has worked but I'll never do it again with gusting wind. It took three days to get the putrid smell out of my nose. The stuff might keep the deer away at least until I can get goat cages around the trees but a few dogs that roam came calling.
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Old 07-31-2017, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
9,718 posts, read 8,267,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
I learned a lesson the hard way. Bought a hose end sprayer to make it quick and easy to spray deer repellent across the fruit trees and grapevines as well as a bean crop between first year trees. So far it has worked but I'll never do it again with gusting wind. It took three days to get the putrid smell out of my nose. The stuff might keep the deer away at least until I can get goat cages around the trees but a few dogs that roam came calling.
Liquid Fence Co. is located in Mt. Pocono; about six or seven miles from our house. Fortunately the wind usually blows in the other direction! Actually I have never smelled it coming from the company; even when driving by. They must have the smell well contained or I have them mixed up with other companies that really smell bad? They are supposed to eventfully relocate to Missouri: Mount Pocono-based Liquid Fence acquired by Wisconsin company - News - poconorecord.com - Stroudsburg, PA.

But, like I have said before; I am not a big fan of the repellent sprays. It is just too easy for me to forget and our deer do not forget! We also have a doe with her fawn sneaking around our house. The doe is teaching her fawn where all the best food is located. But she isn't alone; I have seen three fawns playing together on our lawn. We have plenty of wild turkeys; but I think they are more of a help and less of a problem to most gardeners - unless they decide to dust themselves in your garden! I do like birds that eat crawling things like deer nymph ticks. Possums are supposedly good at killing ticks while grooming - but they also like the fruit off your trees.
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Old 07-31-2017, 01:26 PM
 
1,439 posts, read 581,231 times
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This is a reason why the WestCoast States are orchard and fruit centers for the USA.
Winters are milder and summers drier.
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Old 07-31-2017, 01:32 PM
 
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Just in case anybody else has some....I have a small orchard of 30 fruit trees of various kinds and I just found out what was causing spots on my apple trees and dwarfing the fruit. It appears its a form of spores coming from my 3 cedar trees not 50 feet away. The cedars will be cut down later in the week.
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Old 07-31-2017, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
9,718 posts, read 8,267,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leastprime View Post
This is a reason why the WestCoast States are orchard and fruit centers for the USA.
Winters are milder and summers drier.
If you go by the shear number of orchards I think the East coast has you beat: https://www.orangepippin.com/orchards/united-states. Of course that link just gives the number of orchards and not the size. But from seeing many of our East coast orchards; I know that we have some very large ones. From that link Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin also have many orchards. The three West coast states combined do not have as many orchards listed as New York by itself. Pennsylvania, my state, has more than California.
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Old 08-04-2017, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
20,284 posts, read 52,840,035 times
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I grew up on a property that was part of an ancient apple orchard. We had 22 apple trees. It was a lot of work and I do not particularly like to eat apples (except Pie and cider), but I loved growing them and selling or giving them away, making cider (or applejack), etc. I have always wanted fruit trees or nut trees. It seems that if you are going to have trees in your ard, may as well eat them. .

When we lived in California we had a great back yard orchard:

Loquat (got quite big and really produced a lot of yummy fruit).

Apricot. (Way better than store apricots. Neighbors begged for some).

Fruit Cocktail (Lemon, Tangello, Grapefruit and one more thing I do not recall). After a few years, the lemon took over all the rest and it was just a lemon tree. I think we only ever got one or two grapefruits and maybe a dozen each of the other two over several years before the lemon took over. Grafted mixed trees do not do that well, but they are cute.

Plumb This had red and yellow plumbs grafted together. The yellow plumbs were only one branch and remained so. Every new branch that grew was red (Purple) plumbs. The yellow plumbs were better, but both were quite good.

Ice Cream Bananas. Spread like mad. Bananas are more like a giant grass than a true tree. Similar to Cannas, except the banana trees can get 10 - 20 feet tall. The bananas would pull the tree over before they fully ripened, but they could still grow that way if we could keep the dogs from eating them. Once you harvest the bananas, you just cut the tree off and more grow from the root ball. We got hundreds of bananas starting with one tree. They spread from the roots and get pretty hard to control. We actually started with two trees, but when they were about six feet tall, the dog ate one of them. (Yes, he ate the whole tree - 220 pound dog.)


Now in Michigan, which is known for its non-citrus trees (cherries, Apples, peaches and pears) we have not been able to get anything to grow. At my dad's house 50 miles away, you put a twig in the ground in in a few years it is a big tree with loads of fruit. Everything grows like mad there. Not for us. If the deer don't eat it or rub their antlers on the tree and kill it, it just sits there for years, barely grows at all, and then dies. We just keep trying using different planting methods. Right now we have a pear tree that has added a few stems since its spring planting. It has a fence around it. Maybe it will survive a few years. I do not even like pears, buy at this point I will take anything that will grow (we got a pear because we bought a plum tree at tractor supply and it died right away, when we went back for a refund/'exchange, all they had was pear trees left.).

I will try another plum this fall and hopefully some Paw paws.
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