U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 07-30-2017, 06:09 PM
 
Location: 76131
1,875 posts, read 1,413,848 times
Reputation: 604

Advertisements

Hello fellow gardeners, I have a few questions in regard as to how far north palm trees can be grown outside, in the ground successfully in the Eastern United States(Basically anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains) so my questions are as follows

1. What has been the Northern limit historically for growing any kind of palm tree("cold/snow tolerant"), or otherwise?

2. Which types of palm trees can be successfully grown in colder climate zones in which many would think palm trees wouldn't stand a chance of surviving a winter with cold, snow or ice?

3. Finally, have changing weather patterns the last 20 or 30+ years allowed an expansion of potentially suitable ornamental range for raising palm trees where they were not able to be grown before?

All answers and insightful information in regards to these questions are greatly appreciated
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-30-2017, 06:21 PM
 
Location: NC
5,943 posts, read 6,592,916 times
Reputation: 11593
Raleigh NC area sees some palms in residences. I assume they are a more cold tolerant variety. USDA hardiness zone 7a.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2017, 11:03 PM
Status: "You meet the nicest people on CD..." (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
38,052 posts, read 43,517,873 times
Reputation: 104080
There are palms that grow in at least 40 states. This is a good site to read about them...
13 Cold Hardy Palm Trees | HGTV
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2017, 03:01 AM
 
2,283 posts, read 1,133,884 times
Reputation: 1753
Neddle palm tree is the hardest palm
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2017, 04:35 PM
 
9,209 posts, read 3,532,170 times
Reputation: 12497
Sagos are not even palm trees but they are listed. Some of those palms are misleading because they can tolerated short periods of low temps but not night and day for an extended period of time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2017, 05:15 PM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
6,042 posts, read 3,408,565 times
Reputation: 4294
Native, as in Palmetto, North Carolina.

Dwarf Palmetto, SE Oklahoma.

Virginia Beach has palm trees.

Ocean City, MD a few Windmill palms.

Dallas has a few palms, they are not close to being "common" though.

Midland-Odessa, Texas has a few palms, as does Carlsbad, NM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2017, 04:05 AM
 
557 posts, read 304,581 times
Reputation: 555
I live in New Jersey and love the tropical look, I put out banana tree's and some palms in May and kind of treat them like a annual, they will last until November sometime, I also have a needle palm in ground that I wrap up in winter that does survive. I have seen some windmill palm people overwinter but with heated enclosures.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2017, 08:56 AM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
10,788 posts, read 6,611,413 times
Reputation: 2506
Trachycarpus palms are extremely cold hardy, they should be able to survive in DC or NYC some winters.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2017, 08:21 PM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
6,042 posts, read 3,408,565 times
Reputation: 4294
Quote:
Originally Posted by masterchef1 View Post
I live in New Jersey and love the tropical look, I put out banana tree's and some palms in May and kind of treat them like a annual, they will last until November sometime, I also have a needle palm in ground that I wrap up in winter that does survive. I have seen some windmill palm people overwinter but with heated enclosures.
Yes, same here.

There is one home near me on Appleby Line that has a windmill palm, about 10 feet tall,
well wrapped in a tent all winter, looking good during the warm half of the year.
I like palms but not sure I could do all it takes to have survive over the winter.
I'm sticking with my yuccas, prickly pear cacti, and sago palms,
all unprotected, except I take the sagos indoors mid october to early may.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top