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Old 08-09-2017, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Virginia
281 posts, read 148,032 times
Reputation: 95

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Will constant use of this product eventually loosen up up hard packed clay?

The product does claim to accomplish this and I live in SW Virginia With a front lawn that is well compacted clay.

I will ( and have last year ) aerate every year but don't think that is enough and if I had a belief that Milogranite really works to loosen up the soil, I would apply this product to our front lawn three or more times a year.
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Old 08-09-2017, 09:50 AM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
1,399 posts, read 562,477 times
Reputation: 1699
I don't think the product itself will actually loosen up the clay compaction. What it will do is give the grass roots a more vigorous growth, which in turn will loosen up the clay.
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
12,899 posts, read 4,897,579 times
Reputation: 6492
Any organic matter will work. Some people avoid Milorganite because in the past, it has been found to contain a higher level of metals.

As LICenter says, the main response is greater root growth. The other thing that happens is that organic matter increases the habitat for soil organisms, including earthworms, which will also loosen soil.

The organic matter provides surface area for microbes to live on and increases the air and water pores in the soil. This is all good for the roots. So yes, aerate and/or dethatch and then immediately apply plenty of organic material of your choice and water it in. As you make the top few inches of your soil more hospitable to life, that life will work on the lower levels.
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Virginia
281 posts, read 148,032 times
Reputation: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
Any organic matter will work. Some people avoid Milorganite because in the past, it has been found to contain a higher level of metals.

As LICenter says, the main response is greater root growth. The other thing that happens is that organic matter increases the habitat for soil organisms, including earthworms, which will also loosen soil.

The organic matter provides surface area for microbes to live on and increases the air and water pores in the soil. This is all good for the roots. So yes, aerate and/or dethatch and then immediately apply plenty of organic material of your choice and water it in. As you make the top few inches of your soil more hospitable to life, that life will work on the lower levels.
Black Cow is a locally available bagged compost/manure so I guess that could be raked onto the surface of the lawn but is costly at $5.00 plus a bag and would probably need several treatments.

Perhaps this along with Milogranite and grass clipping might help to increase the soil organisms.
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Old 08-09-2017, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
36,998 posts, read 39,765,629 times
Reputation: 98600
•It’s a slow-release fertilizer that feeds for up to 10 weeks...
Why Use Milorganite
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Old 08-09-2017, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Virginia
281 posts, read 148,032 times
Reputation: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
Its a slow-release fertilizer that feeds for up to 10 weeks...
Why Use Milorganite
I am going to use this product at least two times per year to feed the roots. I can't image this non chemical fertilizer will not benefit the soil and grass roots. Going to do my first application in September after aerating and overseeing and then in November I will apply the Scotts Winter Guard fertilizer unless someone can recommend a better product to use.
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Old Yesterday, 05:16 AM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,168 posts, read 1,609,252 times
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Not exactly, aerating will provide the most benefit, while combining it with Milorganite will definitely help.

When aerating, be sure to go over the lawn multiple times through various directions.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickcin View Post
Will constant use of this product eventually loosen up up hard packed clay?

The product does claim to accomplish this and I live in SW Virginia With a front lawn that is well compacted clay.

I will ( and have last year ) aerate every year but don't think that is enough and if I had a belief that Milogranite really works to loosen up the soil, I would apply this product to our front lawn three or more times a year.
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Old Yesterday, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
4,922 posts, read 7,113,166 times
Reputation: 8568
Milwaukee sanitary district sludge on your lawn? Ugh. I really don't see the advantage over regular fertilizers/aeration.
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Old Yesterday, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Zone 6B ~ Northern VA
1,168 posts, read 1,609,252 times
Reputation: 303
Thanks for posting the link for those who are not familiar with it.

Great product, especially for those of us who prefer to feed the soil instead of feeding the grass blade.


Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
Its a slow-release fertilizer that feeds for up to 10 weeks...
Why Use Milorganite
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Old Today, 12:26 PM
 
1,735 posts, read 574,996 times
Reputation: 1445
Milorganite has always had, and still does, a good dose of heavy metals. They claim it's within EPA limits. But they don't tell you that heavy metals tend to accumulate. Quantitative data on the heavy metals in the stuff is hard to find, but this is an interesting article on the topic: Sludge by Any Name Will Never Be

Would I use it? Probably on the grass if it were more cost effective. But it's a pretty expensive way to put down nitrogen, and where I am, in SW NH, we have other even more obviously organic sources.
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