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Old 08-14-2017, 12:57 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,022 posts, read 5,798,623 times
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I usually sharpen at approximately a 15 - 20 degree angle.

For garden and other outdoor tools first I use a file to take off burrs and nicks and smooth the edge then a double sided whetstone with water to put a sharp edge on. I find that rubbing some oil into the blade after each sharpening helps prevent pitting and a sharp edge will last longer.

For my kitchen knives and scissors first I use a honing steel to smooth away burrs and nicks and then a fine diamond file followed by either a ceramic rod or stropping leather (sometimes both) to put a razor sharp edge on.


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Old 09-30-2018, 08:29 AM
 
Location: united states
6 posts, read 773 times
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From long-handled pruning shears to shorter grass cutters or long-bladed hedge shears, these blades can quickly wear down after a few seasons of work. These shears have two beveled edges, top and bottom, that both need to be sharpened (trying to sharpen any other part of the blade is useless, so make sure you know where these bevels are). The good news is that, with a little help from a clamp, a basic mill file can quickly give shears back their edge with minimal effort. If you notice the blade is nicked or bent, you may want to buy new shears and make sure to only use them on smaller branches.
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Old 10-02-2018, 06:00 AM
 
6 posts, read 950 times
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The best for sharping tools is large water stone
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Old 10-03-2018, 05:59 AM
 
Location: NJ
9,182 posts, read 20,208,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZgarden View Post
Every time my pruners get dull, I go out and buy another one. I do not know how to sharpen anything, especially garden tools, and I don't think there is a service like that around here. When I was little, there was an old guy with a push cart who came around to homes to sharpen scissors, tools, etc. I really miss him.
For pruning shears you want a Felco brand sharpening stone. I have this one. It's the perfect size for pruning shear, even scissors. Oops, they may not make it any more. Use this link to see which new product you like best, they're made by Felco. Let me know if you need help. The ones I see look like they'll work

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
What you need to learn to do is using a diamond hone. Pruners are sharpened like scissors - one side of the blade only. First step is to smooth out the flat side of the blade with the coarse diamond or stone to remove any burrs. Put magic marker on the angled edge to see how you are doing. Move the diamond hone across the blade at right angle to the edge. Your pruning tools should be able to cut paper without tearing. I'm sure there are videos on the yousual site. ;-)
Here's the brand I use:
Smith's Pack Pal Dual Grit Diamond Stone Sharpener | Smith's - Knife Sharpening Equipment, Electric Knife Sharpeners, Sharpening Stones - Since 1886
I use this for knives with a wedge edge blade, but does not work well with long pruner blades:
50591- Diamond/Arkansas Stones Precision Knife Sharpening System | Smith's - Knife Sharpening Equipment, Electric Knife Sharpeners, Sharpening Stones - Since 1886
Good advice that a beginner can do with magic marker
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Old 10-03-2018, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
6,296 posts, read 10,466,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t1000k View Post
The best for sharping tools is large water stone
I think you mean a whetstone.
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Old 10-03-2018, 08:25 AM
 
23,892 posts, read 17,582,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
I use it for axes, pruners, and loppers with perfect results. Cooking knives are treated with more care.
yup. a file is perfectly fine for those tools.
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