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Old 08-27-2017, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
10,375 posts, read 8,806,674 times
Reputation: 6802

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
Yes, I missed that vital piece of equipment, chain sharpener. A file works if you are good with it, but you need a guide or an electric sharpener.
Isn't this the kind of tool that needs to run on alcohol free mix? So add a fuel can to the list.
If you hit a rock or nail it is better to grind your chain. It simply takes too long to file it out. I have the chainsaw grinder and I use to sharpen the chains when I had my shop. I also sold firewood at one time and I have cut hundreds of cords of wood in my lifetime. When cutting firewood I would sharpen my chains about two times with the file while in the woods. Then I would put them on my grinder to reset the angle and make the teeth uniform again.

As far as ethanol or leaded gas; I still use the cheapest gas available which is ethanol/gas blends available from the local stations. The leaded fuel runs about $24/gallon (if you add it up) - you are buying it in small cans. While all the manufacturers complain about the ethanol blends; they still have to make their products to run with currently available fuel.
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Old 08-27-2017, 04:56 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
23,919 posts, read 51,492,371 times
Reputation: 23741
Quote:
Originally Posted by sasie123 View Post
What type of chain saw should i buy...
A chain saw shouldn't be bought by (let alone for) anyone who can't answer these questions
based on their own knowledge and direct experience of using them. Several of them.
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
10,375 posts, read 8,806,674 times
Reputation: 6802
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
A chain saw shouldn't be bought by (let alone for) anyone who can't answer these questions
based on their own knowledge and direct experience of using them. Several of them.
Actually they never got back to us. Their son could have experience; which we doubt because they asked which kind to buy. We also do not know the age of the user. Hopefully they will get back and answer our questions. Yes; none of us want to see somebody hurt. I have sharpened chains for two customers that had accidents: One had forty stitches and one had almost sixty and it could have been worse. I always prided myself on how sharp I can sharpen one's chain. They are very dangerous if you don't know what you are doing. You can cut yourself pretty good just handling a new chain for your saw if you are not careful.
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Texas
4,749 posts, read 10,144,691 times
Reputation: 8331
I have 3 gas chain saws and one electric. The electric is the one I'll usually use. No having to screw with gas and oil mix and no having to jerk on the rope like a dope cause the POS won't start. I have a new Stihl that's never run more than 5 minutes at any one time mostly because of the carburetor. As far as I'm concerned Stihl is crap. Even our Stihl commercial grade equipment at our church stays in the shop more than it gets used. We've since gone to a generator on a wagon that we pull behind the riding mower. Electric tools will do any job the gas will but it may take a little longer as you might have to go slow with it. We've found via the church, that electric tools will out last and out work any gas operated junk on the market. Our electric yard tools at church have lasted for the last 2 years, trouble free. We couldn't get 3 months out of the best Stihl made and we had several over the years. Unless he lives in the Sequoias, an electric chain saw will do more work trouble free and be far more reliable. Just don't buy cheap or one with a lot of plastic.
If you want a good, heavy duty electric chain saw, look at the Makita. The only downside to it, it's a little on the heavy side for an electric but it's near bulletproof for the average user.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...odtag101240-20
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
10,375 posts, read 8,806,674 times
Reputation: 6802
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrapperL View Post
I have 3 gas chain saws and one electric. The electric is the one I'll usually use. No having to screw with gas and oil mix and no having to jerk on the rope like a dope cause the POS won't start. I have a new Stihl that's never run more than 5 minutes at any one time mostly because of the carburetor. As far as I'm concerned Stihl is crap. Even our Stihl commercial grade equipment at our church stays in the shop more than it gets used. We've since gone to a generator on a wagon that we pull behind the riding mower. Electric tools will do any job the gas will but it may take a little longer as you might have to go slow with it. We've found via the church, that electric tools will out last and out work any gas operated junk on the market. Our electric yard tools at church have lasted for the last 2 years, trouble free. We couldn't get 3 months out of the best Stihl made and we had several over the years. Unless he lives in the Sequoias, an electric chain saw will do more work trouble free and be far more reliable. Just don't buy cheap or one with a lot of plastic.
If you want a good, heavy duty electric chain saw, look at the Makita. The only downside to it, it's a little on the heavy side for an electric but it's near bulletproof for the average user.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...odtag101240-20
I had one 16" gas Poulan that I ran over with a full load of wood when it fell off the tailgate backing up. I had to replace the blade and the handle and still got another 50 cords out of it! I am glad you're happy with your electric; but you would never get me to switch. Of course it helps if you owned a repair shop and know how to keep everything running.
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Old 08-27-2017, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Floribama
11,929 posts, read 27,005,904 times
Reputation: 9352
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I had one 16" gas Poulan that I ran over with a full load of wood when it fell off the tailgate backing up. I had to replace the blade and the handle and still got another 50 cords out of it! I am glad you're happy with your electric; but you would never get me to switch. Of course it helps if you owned a repair shop and know how to keep everything running.
I've had Poulans... junk... Homelite... also junk. The best one I've owned was a Husqvarna 345, always started on the first pull, but I finally gave it away after the oiler crapped out. My current one is a Jonsered, and even though its made by Husqvarna, I'm not loving it quite as much.
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Old 08-27-2017, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
10,375 posts, read 8,806,674 times
Reputation: 6802
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
I've had Poulans... junk... Homelite... also junk. The best one I've owned was a Husqvarna 345, always started on the first pull, but I finally gave it away after the oiler crapped out. My current one is a Jonsered, and even though its made by Husqvarna, I'm not loving it quite as much.
I have a Husqvarna 345, and two Poulans. I have had great luck with my Poulans - but I was a dealer. I am 70 now and like the one little 16" Poulan better than my 345; it's lighter! I also have a heavy Poulan 6000 Counter vibe that has a lot of horsepower - you have to watch the kickback. The 6000 I have had for over 40 years.

The 345 I bought from Tractor Supply. I see that they now sell the Jonsered. I know nothing about them and I think I have enough saws to last me the rest of my life. I do not think I will be using one in the next 10 or 20 years.
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Old 08-27-2017, 07:52 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
25,892 posts, read 44,696,539 times
Reputation: 23476
My McCullough has been going since 1980, and I have only had to replace the chain and bar a couple of times. I use it 4-5 times a year now, but used to cut a lot of firewood with it.
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Old 08-27-2017, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
8,883 posts, read 16,539,039 times
Reputation: 7301
If they have to ask, I'd be scared to give them advice. And how old is the son? How big is the tree? What's the level of experience? Too may unknowns to come up with any sort of reasonable answer, IMHO.

I've just discovered electric chain saws. There's a little one around here that is just a beauty for trimming things that are too big to get with the loppers or the pole lopper. Up to a six inch diameter, the little electric chain saw would be my first choice. Mostly since it's really easy to start and really light to use. For anything bigger than a 6" diameter, well, then a gas chainsaw would be best.

We generally use ethanol free gas in the chainsaws and other small gas engines since the ethanol can sometimes eat some of the plastic parts. It really seems to like the primer bulbs.
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Old 08-27-2017, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Billings, MT
8,149 posts, read 5,956,825 times
Reputation: 10335
Long ago and far away, when we had a wood stove for heat, I had a Stihl 041AV saw with a 24 inch bar & chain. That thing just would not quit!
Even longer ago, when my step father worked in the woods as a faller, he had two Homelite 5/30 saws, with 36 inch bars & chains. They kept us fed for several years, mostly trouble free. He trained me in how to use a saw when I was a teenager, so that I could cut fire wood while he was working.
Now, I have a Craftsman 16 inch saw. At 75, I don't think I could handle that old 041, and I know I could never carry that old 5/30 (5HP, 30 pounds; without bar, chain, gas and oil!) I have no idea who made that Craftsman for Sears. It gets run about a half hour per year. I use 10% ethanol fuel, with Opti 2 lubricating oil and Sta-Bil mixed per the instructions. My 2-cycle fuel is over a year old, and still usable.
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