U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-21-2017, 02:51 PM
 
1,265 posts, read 614,257 times
Reputation: 441

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by LKJ1988 View Post
Anymore it is just hot year round and little rain and then get 20 to 30" in a few weeks time like the last 3 years. We never get much wind here unless a very rare hurricane comes near and maybe 35 knts blows in the winter that are also very rare as we just don't have winters anymore. Still no cool weather for us and 90's almost every day this month.

if this is the case then (as mentioned earlier in this thread) then your climate and soil conditions may be very stressful to your plant (hence the extremely early defoliation) and assuming that it continues to live will it THRIVE for you and provide the shade (or whatever else you desire) or will it just struggle and barely live or grow. hopefully the tree will indeed establish get going and get growing sooner rather than later.


that said, and IF (God forbid) that it either dies or just sits there doing nothing much, I would suggest contacting your local county extension service office, or KNOWLEDGABLE nursery person, or the staff at a local botanic garden and get their input on recommended trees for your area that meet your specific criteria as to growth rate, size, appearance, etc. do not rely on advertisements about "fast growing trees that grow ANYWHERE" as sadly there is no such thing and in any case often the fastest growing tree may also have other significant problems like being brittle to storm winds, "messy" from dropping leaves, has invasive roots that damage foundations or clog septic lines, or just plain get too big for the area you planted".


FWIW, I have a eucalyptus nitens tree that in 17 years has grown to roughly 70' and looks beautiful to me. it does drop lots of leaves throughout the year, has some huge surface roots, and because of it's narrow but dense crown would make a fairly lousy shade tree plus the danger of in really strong winds combined with saturated soils might blow it MIGHT over and destroy or damage most everything in the path of it's fall. luckily I have no close neighbors and the tree is several hundred feet from my house so those potential problems are pretty minimal but as Mr. T used to say, "I pity the fool" who would simply because it IS fast growing place it in their backyard---especially under good growing conditions--- because of all those possible concerns.


again, good luck to you and your plant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-21-2017, 03:14 PM
 
8,506 posts, read 6,352,560 times
Reputation: 2909
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeinbandonoregon View Post
if this is the case then (as mentioned earlier in this thread) then your climate and soil conditions may be very stressful to your plant (hence the extremely early defoliation) and assuming that it continues to live will it THRIVE for you and provide the shade (or whatever else you desire) or will it just struggle and barely live or grow. hopefully the tree will indeed establish get going and get growing sooner rather than later.


that said, and IF (God forbid) that it either dies or just sits there doing nothing much, I would suggest contacting your local county extension service office, or KNOWLEDGABLE nursery person, or the staff at a local botanic garden and get their input on recommended trees for your area that meet your specific criteria as to growth rate, size, appearance, etc. do not rely on advertisements about "fast growing trees that grow ANYWHERE" as sadly there is no such thing and in any case often the fastest growing tree may also have other significant problems like being brittle to storm winds, "messy" from dropping leaves, has invasive roots that damage foundations or clog septic lines, or just plain get too big for the area you planted".


FWIW, I have a eucalyptus nitens tree that in 17 years has grown to roughly 70' and looks beautiful to me. it does drop lots of leaves throughout the year, has some huge surface roots, and because of it's narrow but dense crown would make a fairly lousy shade tree plus the danger of in really strong winds combined with saturated soils might blow it MIGHT over and destroy or damage most everything in the path of it's fall. luckily I have no close neighbors and the tree is several hundred feet from my house so those potential problems are pretty minimal but as Mr. T used to say, "I pity the fool" who would simply because it IS fast growing place it in their backyard---especially under good growing conditions--- because of all those possible concerns.


again, good luck to you and your plant.
I will post back here once the tree starts to put out again. Like i said, it started fine and grew 15 ft from Feb till July. Just has the seeds on it now. I can pull on it and it is springy and still green. If it were dead it would be dry and break easy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2017, 04:03 PM
 
1,265 posts, read 614,257 times
Reputation: 441
Quote:
Originally Posted by LKJ1988 View Post
I will post back here once the tree starts to put out again. Like i said, it started fine and grew 15 ft from Feb till July. Just has the seeds on it now. I can pull on it and it is springy and still green. If it were dead it would be dry and break easy.

yes and as mentioned before those are hopeful signs but whether it comes out of it's present condition either to grow like it is supposed and look healthy and happy to OR just barely survive and look sickly and sad because of those on-going environmental stresses which MAY be a source of pain and misery to both of you IS the puzzler.


IMHO, the real concern and question is whether this tree is really the "right" tree for you and your situation---or no. most likely the answer will be (not that surprisingly, LOL) is how well it does or doesn't grow for both the short and long term.


good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2017, 05:26 PM
 
8,506 posts, read 6,352,560 times
Reputation: 2909
Just noticed a green shoot coming out near the fork of the trunk. So this is kinda strange.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2017, 07:01 PM
 
1,265 posts, read 614,257 times
Reputation: 441
Quote:
Originally Posted by LKJ1988 View Post
Just noticed a green shoot coming out near the fork of the trunk. So this is kinda strange.
not necessarily. the tree can be a very powerful re-sprouter from the base if there is damage or stress to the main trunk which may very well be why the tree went leafless in the first place. theoretically, you MIGHT consider eventually removing the original stem (say sometime next spring IF the "new" stem(s) look good) and letting (potentially) stronger new growth take over . you can always reduce all the various new stems down to one or two later on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2017, 07:07 PM
 
8,506 posts, read 6,352,560 times
Reputation: 2909
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeinbandonoregon View Post
not necessarily. the tree can be a very powerful re-sprouter from the base if there is damage or stress to the main trunk which may very well be why the tree went leafless in the first place. theoretically, you MIGHT consider eventually removing the original stem (say sometime next spring IF the "new" stem(s) look good) and letting (potentially) stronger new growth take over . you can always reduce all the various new stems down to one or two later on.
The tree is well alive all the way up. It's so warm here about year round that the tree could end up doing anything. I will keep checking in if i notice changes. Just odd it started dropping leaves from the bottom up in late July.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2017, 07:31 PM
 
1,265 posts, read 614,257 times
Reputation: 441
the fact that the tree lost leaves way earlier than normal is almost certainly a sign of stress of some sort for some reason. often, the trees response to stress is to get rid of the oldest leaves (which are often lower down on the trunk) and then the newer leaves if the stress continues. FWIW, my tree is generally losing a leaf or two most every day during the growing season under fair growing conditions and if the (apparently fairly newly planted) tree has to face periodic extreme heat, excessive rainfall AND drought because of the shallow poor soil your tree has to endure then loss of many (or all) leaves is probably not surprising.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2017, 07:48 PM
 
8,506 posts, read 6,352,560 times
Reputation: 2909
I planted it in Feb and it took off like crazy. It was a super dry winter and Spring, then got 4" in May, 5" in June and only 3" in July. Then got 24" in Aug and Sept, then the hurricane in Sept, but it had lost most of it's leaves by the time the hurricane came.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2017, 05:44 PM
 
8,506 posts, read 6,352,560 times
Reputation: 2909
Another shoot came out, but they are not doing much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:08 PM
 
1,265 posts, read 614,257 times
Reputation: 441
Quote:
Originally Posted by LKJ1988 View Post
Another shoot came out, but they are not doing much.

this MAY be because the plant is still rather stressed and it's growth is inhibited or perhaps because of weather conditions---too cool too dry or something else. this is the dormant season for this plant in most areas so it may "think" that this is not the time for really significant growth. OTOH, IF you are in a dry spell AND the soil beneath the very top surface around the tree is dry than you may want to consider supplemental water for the tree---especially if you are not expecting rainfall in the next week or so--so that if the plant IS trying to make a growth spurt then lack of moisture will not be a limiting factor. .


again, wait and see is likely the best option for you and the tree.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; Yesterday at 02:41 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top