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Old 09-03-2017, 07:08 AM
 
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Anyone try one out? Mine has grown 15ft in 8 months time since i got it.
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Old 09-06-2017, 11:11 PM
 
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the paulownias (there are several species of what are known as "empress" or "foxglove" trees) are generally all fast growers. a major concern is that in the right kind of climate (warm wet summers) some of them may invasively naturalize and become a "weed". they do have beautiful flowers and often impressive sized foliage and combined with the rapid growth may in certain circumstances be "instant trees" for the landscape . in parts of the world like it's native Asia and in parts of the American south various species are planted in plantations for wood production and may be a "cash crop". besides the potential for becoming invasive, the fast growth may produce rather brittle branches that can break in high winds, and the tree may not be winter hardy in colder areas. FWIW, my experience growing p. fortunei (a species with white flowers) is that the big leaves create lots of litter in the fall (no fall color) but they decompose VERY rapidly on the ground----totally gone in 4-6 weeks---we rake them up around the trunk of the tree so that any nutrients in the leaves go back in the ground to become an on-site source of "recycled" nutrients for the tree.


the trees can be cut back every few years to produce really big leaves (no flowers) from the stump which can be even more striking "tropical" looking foliage than the regular type.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 09-06-2017 at 11:40 PM..
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Old 09-08-2017, 09:03 AM
 
Location: British Columbia
4,141 posts, read 4,537,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeinbandonoregon View Post
the paulownias (there are several species of what are known as "empress" or "foxglove" trees) are generally all fast growers. a major concern is that in the right kind of climate (warm wet summers) some of them may invasively naturalize and become a "weed". they do have beautiful flowers and often impressive sized foliage and combined with the rapid growth may in certain circumstances be "instant trees" for the landscape . in parts of the world like it's native Asia and in parts of the American south various species are planted in plantations for wood production and may be a "cash crop". besides the potential for becoming invasive, the fast growth may produce rather brittle branches that can break in high winds, and the tree may not be winter hardy in colder areas. FWIW, my experience growing p. fortunei (a species with white flowers) is that the big leaves create lots of litter in the fall (no fall color) but they decompose VERY rapidly on the ground----totally gone in 4-6 weeks---we rake them up around the trunk of the tree so that any nutrients in the leaves go back in the ground to become an on-site source of "recycled" nutrients for the tree.


the trees can be cut back every few years to produce really big leaves (no flowers) from the stump which can be even more striking "tropical" looking foliage than the regular type.

Good information.

That's an intriguing idea about cutting them back to stumps to produce bigger leaves. I'd have never thought of doing that but of course it makes sense that the stumps would produce extra large leaves and it's probably quite thickly foliaged so it's going to look like a big chunky bush.


.
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Old 09-08-2017, 11:58 AM
 
1,180 posts, read 576,412 times
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Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Good information.

That's an intriguing idea about cutting them back to stumps to produce bigger leaves. I'd have never thought of doing that but of course it makes sense that the stumps would produce extra large leaves and it's probably quite thickly foliaged so it's going to look like a big chunky bush.


.

hi Zoisite. thanks for the rep. believe it or not, some gardeners never ever allow the tree to ever grow "normally" but instead cut it back every couple of years ("stooling") to perpetuate the really big leaves. for those folks who fear seed production and possible unwanted seedlings this may be a way to have the plant and enjoy the super rapid growth and those huge leaves without the other potential problems of the tree. FWIW, some folks have done the same thing with "tree of heaven"/Ailanthus to create a cluster of tall, lush feathery leaves---"like some ferocious fern" as someone once observed, LOL.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 09-08-2017 at 12:59 PM..
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