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Old 09-09-2017, 07:12 PM
 
Location: U.S.A.
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Hello all, the purpose of this thread is to chime in on when and where the leaves will begin changing colors, so I will make this thread objective as straightforward as I can; so my questions are the following

1. Due to the unusually cool start to September, is it possible that the fall foliage display will come sooner than usual?

2. Around when do you suspect the leaves will reach their climax or maximum color display in your location?

3. Finally, have any trees begun to change in your location yet, also, do you expect a spectacular display or a muted display of fall foliage this year?
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Old 09-10-2017, 09:22 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
25,845 posts, read 44,594,065 times
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I don't know where you are, but our September has been unusually hot, and with a record number of days without rain some younger trees are dying well before they turn color. Other than that, the maples, vine maples, and aspens are still green here on my property, but the liquidambar is just starting to turn. I have found the best color to come in a year with a quick, sudden onset of cold, and it's too early to see that, mid October will be the time to see what we will get.
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Old 09-10-2017, 11:45 PM
 
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LOL, the "poison oak" (toxicodendron diversifolia) in many places is already a beautiful flaming red color---it's generally always among the first of the native plants in the PNW to assume "autumn" colors. this may be a good thing as it's a useful way to know and avoid contact with this plant (in either it's "vine" or "shrub" forms) and it's highly irritating "sap". since this is the warmest and driest part of the year (no significant rain for almost three months in many places) in our area much of the color in the woods is caused by plants going deciduous (or sometimes even dying as Hemlock140 mentioned) because of drought stress rather than cooling temps. true fall color which is generally not especially significant in the northwest (yellow in ash, bigleaf maple and cottonwood, red in vine maple and western dogwood) mostly evergreen conifer forest compared to the eastern deciduous forest) is still probably a month or so away.


sadly much of the color in the woods in our region right now is caused by all the forest fires---red flames and black smoke leaving an ash grey and carbon black landscape in it's wake.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 09-10-2017 at 11:59 PM..
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Old 09-11-2017, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
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In Southern VA, the sweet gum trees are just beginning to turn red...usually the first specie of tree to do so.



Regards
Gemstone1
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Old 09-11-2017, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
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Due to the mild and very wet summer, our trees "over-leaved" so in August, maybe because it has been a cold August this year, some of the leaves turned yellow and dropped. I did some research and found out that sometimes trees grow too many leaves and then find they cannot support them so they shed them early. So far, September has been pretty coldish too. Down into the high 40s/low 50s at night and mid 70s tops during the day. Normally we have much warmer September. If this continues, I would expect early color this year. The wild color adventure occurs up north mostly in or near the upper peninsula. It is unbelievable up there many years. Looks like another planet. Having had such a mild wet summer and then early cold int eh fall - it should be a good year.
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Old 09-11-2017, 01:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gemstone1 View Post
In Southern VA, the sweet gum trees are just beginning to turn red...usually the first specie of tree to do so.



Regards
Gemstone1
nice. sweetgums in Maryland rarely get that colorful.
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Old 09-12-2017, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
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Sweet gums here in Georgia (South Metro Atlanta) are gorgeous! They turn a deep purplish red! Love sweet gums, except in early spring when THOSE gumballs fall making me rake TWICE! LOL
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Old 09-13-2017, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Central WI
894 posts, read 295,095 times
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Red maples started turning here last week and hickories and oaks are starting to fade their green.

Deciduous trees need sunny days to keep up a high rate of photosynthesis and then cool nites so they can't replace their spent chlorophyll fast enough in order to change color. In fact, they don't really "change" color. The just lose their green chlorophyll and then the other pigments, which always had been present but over-powered by the green, can show thru.

Ir has been unseasonably cool here for the past month or so and an early frost had been predicted for this week. But then two large solar flares occurred about a week ago which warms things up. Now we're warmer than usual.
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Old 09-14-2017, 11:41 AM
Status: "those denying the robot threat are probably robots too" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
18,515 posts, read 17,952,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Red maples started turning here last week and hickories and oaks are starting to fade their green.

Deciduous trees need sunny days to keep up a high rate of photosynthesis and then cool nites so they can't replace their spent chlorophyll fast enough in order to change color. In fact, they don't really "change" color. The just lose their green chlorophyll and then the other pigments, which always had been present but over-powered by the green, can show thru.

Ir has been unseasonably cool here for the past month or so and an early frost had been predicted for this week. But then two large solar flares occurred about a week ago which warms things up. Now we're warmer than usual.

it doesn't work that way
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Old 09-14-2017, 09:49 PM
JRR
 
Location: Algood TN
2,198 posts, read 1,368,298 times
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Rode into town today and noticed several dogwoods already fully turned and some maples are starting to get the first leaves turning. Our first autumn here so looking forward to (hopefully) some nice colors.
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